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447- Strategies to help you when podcasting is no longer fun

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we revisit the topic of helping the podcaster get over any negative feelings that may creep up for podcasting when the passion and thrill is gone for you.

In this repurposed episode, we hope to give you tips and ideas to create strategies and help you to avoid the negative feelings that can result from the following:

  • Boredom,
  • burnout,
  • overwork,
  • lack of socialization with other podcasters,
  • lack of content (because you may have exhausted your content and cannot spawn new episodes from newer ideas), etc.
  • competition that has overtaken your show;
  • too much repetition in your workflow;
  • inability to participate in podcast meetups or podcamps or podcast conferences;
  • you feel attracted more to social media instead of podcasting;
  • you may feel that you have “grown out” of podcasting;
  • health problems that make you lose energy or ability to engage in podcasting in the way you did when you first started;
  • and other reasons that are mentioned in this episode.

I, myself, have felt down in certain times. And I give you a number of strategies that can help you get out of your slump of negativity. These did work for me.

In fact, there are GROWTH strategies that may work for you — for example, starting a podcast membership site (such as the one Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show created called Podcasters Society), or even starting or participating in a podcast network.

And, of course, there is always the direction of monetizing your podcast. You can refer to Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting show in his free and earlier book, More Podcast Money (or the updated book called Profit from your Podcast).

I hope that some of these strategies that have worked for me as a podcaster can also help you during the times when you may begin to feel that “the thrill is gone” from podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

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446- Case study review — how Evo Terra creates his podcast

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the recent article in the podnews.net newsletter that reviews how Evo Terra creates and produces his podcast show of PodcastPontifications.com.

For any podcaster that has known Evo, this would seem like a very interesting story. As I have known Evo since 2007 when I met him in person at a Podcamp conference in Arizona, I considered this of great value. For he has been a master podcaster, as well as an author who wrote several of the first books on podcasting in 2005 and 2007 (i.e., Podcasting for Dummies and Expert podcasting practices for Dummies).


Why this article in the podnews.net newsletter? Well, I guess that Evo got tired of people asking him why he spends 3.5 hours per episode and 4 episodes per week for almost 350 episodes to do his show — and that begs the question of the description of his workflow. So I guess he decided to publish the answer and point people to the article as a reply.

Very much like the situation with Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting show, Dave constantly had to explain and answer the question of how someone can make money from podcasting. And so what did Dave do? He wrote a book, More Podcast Money (which is being updated with a new book, Profit from Your Podcast). And now, Dave can point to the book as a detailed reply once and for all.


Now, for aspiring or new podcasters who may ask Evo the same question (possibly in a webinar or a conference or a presentation), this article from Evo presents itself as a CASE STUDY.

In it, Evo describes the following details of his planning, his equipment, his recording, his production, his publishing — and then he goes into the details of WHY he takes so long (21 times the length of each episode) for final production:

  • Sound Conditioning:  these details describe how his environment for recording is prepared for recording;
  • Microphone: Shure SM7B mounted on a VIVO swingarm-mount
  • Audio Interface: Zoom H6, a portable recorder that has a lot of features and functions for recording either in a studio setting or the outdoors;
  • Computer: Mac Mini, which is my dedicated studio computer. 
  • Digital Audio Workstation or DAW:
  • Camera:  None, as his show of Podcast Pontifications is not a video podcast. But yes, there is a video version. 
  • Media Hosting Company: Captivate.fm, of which I sit on the Advisory Board. (Disclosure – so does Podnews’s Editor).
  • Website: PodcastPontifications.com is managed via and hosted by Webfow
  • Other Software: as described.
  • Pre-production:  And he delivers a bulleted list in this case study of what a typical schedule is like for him in the preparation and production tasks.
  • Creating a title and finalizing imagery;
  • Creating the “script” for the show
  • Production and live streaming: recording and creating the mp3 file;
  • Exporting the mp3 file to Descript for a full transcription.
  • The Writing and written editing: post-production
  • Publishing & Distribution: this can include scheduling and publishing the video and posting it to appropriate sites and web pages, as well as finalizing the ID3 tags.
  • Final syndication.

Now, all the details are not given here in the show notes or podcast episode — they are in the podnews.net article. I strongly recommend that ALL podcasters consume this article, so that they can see how a real  pro podcaster (i.e., one who wrote the book on podcasting) actually describes his workflow and tasks in the planning, production and publishing of his episodes.

I feel that we can ALL learn something from the old masters (of which I consider Evo one). And some of us may want to compare our own workflow and tasks to see if we need to improve our show with either additional plug-ins, software, or other tasks.

In any case, I feel that any podcaster worth his salt will get enjoyment out of Evo’s article — especially since his sense of humor and his element of “disruption” come out loud and clear in his writing. Please enjoy.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Evo Terra of PodcastPontifications.com and podnews.com. All rights reserved.

 

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445- Tips for novice Podcast editors

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we reflect on some tips given by medium.com in an article titled “Top 5 tips for novice podcast editors.”

Now, this seemed interesting, because the task of editing the audio in podcasts (and the video for video podcasts — or screencasts that call themselves podcasts — is always a sore point with podcasters. This is because it can be a very time-consuming and arduous project for many who are not as technically competent as some of the original podcasters, or have very little patience or just want the fastest and easiest way to finalize an mp3 file for publishing. So the article is designed for those podcasters who are mainly doing editing for a client or for a fee.

The author, Tanner Campbell, cites these five tips for podcasters (which, in my opinion, are really designed for beginning or aspiring podcasters):

  • Friction is public enemy #1 — and Tanner specifically highlights this with: “Friction should be defined as “any decision, action, or communication which unnecessarily forces a client to pay attention to you.””  This can also signify the impatience of customers who hire you to do the editing, as well as the desire to remain aloof until the customer gets frustrated with either delays or too much immediate communication. As a matter of fact, there are 2 quotes given for the emails you should be sending to the client.
  • Learn to say “no,” to defend your standards and to value your time.
  • There is no correct way to edit a podcast — regardless of what the client may expect or think or advise you to do (after all, YOU are the editor);
  • Set expectations — like any good business, you should have a STATEMENT OF WORK that outlines the project, the jobs to be done, the tasks to be done, the time for each, etc. And if the client goes past the agreed-upon edit cycles (for me it was usually 2), then an additional charge must be spelled out in the contract and statement of work (e.g., twice the charge in your work breakdown schedule in your statement of work);
  • Set boundaries (for ALL deliverables involved in the editing process);

Suggestions from experience in profitable editing

So, the factor of time can be a sore point for clients, who expect you to take every idea as it comes along and make changes. You should be aware of what Charlie “Tremendous” Jones said about  the model known as Production to Perfection — especially for new edits just received for content that should have already been pronounced as “golden” or final. Otherwise, your podcast editing will NOT be profitable, and the client will never be satisfied and the editing project may drag on and on without end. You should avoid the saying from the client “I can’t describe it, but I’ll know when I see or hear it.”

Now, like any good business, you should have a STATEMENT OF WORK that outlines the project, the SCOPE of the work and the jobs to be done, the tasks to be done, the time for each, etc. And if the client goes past the agreed-upon edit cycles (for me it was usually 2), then an additional charge must be spelled out in the contract and statement of work (e.g., twice the charge in your project  work breakdown schedule in your statement of work). This is a good way to set your boundaries, with the written signature of agreement from the client, so that there could be no misunderstanding of the boundaries and what the client can expect if he asks you to deviate from them.

As for this podcaster, I myself spend the most time in the preparation of both the CONTRACT and the STATEMENT OF WORK and SCOPE OF WORK for the client.

In one case, I actually did the editing and production of the final mp3 for the prospect BEFORE the SOW or the contract was signed. I did this so that he could see the quality of the audio and the finished mp3 (or, as he called it, the Productized deliverable). And I did not charge for this “proof of concept” delivered to him. After he was excited, then I submitted a detailed scope of work for the client, as well as the contract. And in the SOW and contract, I had referred to the proof of concept deliverables for the quality agreed to by the client.

I reviewed every detail with the client (and I did record our conversation about this agreement with him, so we could review the discussion later if there was a question about it that came up).  Only then did the customer sign and initial both — and then the project was under way, with milestones and deadlines and dates for deliverables which were now set in stone (with any exceptions being spelled out in the contract). This prevented confusion or misunderstanding, and the recording just reinforced this.

And usually, the client was agreeable and happy and knew what he could expect and when. And this also gave me the opportunity to see if the client would become a GOOD client. If so, then additional discounts could be given (e.g., “customer value” discount) as well as some additional work being done as “added value” — as long as the customer recognized and agreed that this was above and beyond the call of duty, with no changes to other expectations. And this seemed to delight the client and cement the relationship.

So, what would happen if the client wanted to check out other editors and do some shopping around? I did welcome that and was patient to hear from the client if there was some new work coming. And surely enough, after an absence of receiving content (I presume that he had gone to another editor), the client returned and became a loyal client. I could only assume that he saw that the best customer service, value and quality came from myself as the editor, and not from anyone else with whom he dealt with just to save a few dollars.

I hope that you, as an editor, can review this article and see which of these practices make sense for your business. And I would suggest that the elements of any good project — the scope of work, the statement of work, the work breakdown schedule and the contract — are tools that you can master and include in your practice to become a successful podcast editor.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Tanner Campbell and medium.com. All rights reserved.

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444- Five tips for Podcasting — to improve or derail your show

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver a perspective of “Five tips” written by other podcasters to deliver both how to make your podcast stand out, as well as recognizing environments that may derail your podcast show.

(1) The first article is one written by Mark Asquith that delivers five ways that can help your podcast to “stand out.” This is the article from the Podcast Business Journal titled “Five ways to make your podcast stand out.”

Mark recommends these tips:

  • Repurpose your podcast content;
  • Be a guest on other podcasts;
  • Feature guests on your podcasts;
  • Use paid advertising channels; and
  • Expand your online presence.

For Mark, putting this all together can be a great strategy to incorporate these tips and provide a written plan to make these suggestions into reality. For him, consistency and continuity are some of the most important factors that can lead to success. As he states in the close of his article: “By optimizing your content, building relationships with fellow podcasters and your audience, you can organically grow and distinguish your brand as well as attract new listeners and subscribers.”


(2) The other article takes an almost opposite theme. It was also delivered by the Podcast Business Journal, and it had the title of “Five things that derail podcast success.”

This article by Steve Goldstein begins with the serious attitude for the podcaster: “five things that will derail your success, including not having a plan, not respecting the listener and not having a fresh take.”

And then Steve describes the five elements that can create a dangerous signal for your podcast. They are:

  • Not having a fresh take, point of view or original topic;
  • Not clearly positioning the benefit of the podcast;
  • Not having a comprehensive promotional plan;
  • Not respecting the listener’s time;
  • Not having a “high definition” map and plan.

And Steve goes into more detail about what he means by these themes (which, for some podcasters, may seem “too simple” and thus, may be disregarded all too quickly).

With the growth of podcasting today, and with over a million “competitors” (that is, the total number of podcast shows) that are competing for the attention of audiences today, Steve summarizes the importance of taking these five elements into account: “these five factors are becoming more difficult to ignore as key success factors.”


As a podcaster, I would recommend that a few minutes should be given to see the five positive elements from Mark and the five caveats from Steve. They can serve as both suggestions for adding to your roadmap of success, as well as perhaps acting like a signpost that warns you of potential “land-mines” on your podcast journey. I think that the best value can come from possibly helping to “spawn” new ideas for you or build on prior ideas to solidify your own podcast journey to success.

We hope that these will help you to define your future steps in podcasting and avoid any problems in the the near future.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

443- Tribute to Podfather Adam Curry for creating shows

In this episode, we focus on Adam Curry, the previous VJ from MTV in years past, who is known as the Podfather — since he and Dave Winer are the creators of podcasting. In today’s environment, Adam is the host of a podcast show, No Agenda, along with John C Dvorak, his co-host.

In particular, we include a prior repurposed episode when I interviewed Adam Curry in Austin to speak about the upcoming podcast show, 2030podcast.com. In fact, as you will hear in this audio episode, it also has been included as episode 1 of that show, 2030podcast.com.

Thus, this repurposed episode (it was episode # 97 of this show, podcastreporter.com) can give you an idea of how another podcast show was spawned with the suggestion and creative thoughts of Adam Curry.

So we hope that you will enjoy this repurposed episode from the live interview in Austin with Adam Curry and myself — especially when we discuss how his suggestion has actually resulted in my podcast show that will discuss the possible coming issues and environment for the year 2030 (and events leading up to that time).

[Editor’s note: the reference to the hardware solution for Podcaster Pro from Adam Curry was canceled, due to the inability to get the minimum order in crowdfunding. Adam delivers the details in several episodes of his No Agenda show.]

Thank you for your attention, and we shall see you next time.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Adam Curry and 2030podcast.com. All rights reserved.

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473- First look at the Dave Jackson book on monetizing podcasts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss in the form of an overview the contents of the recent book from Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting called “Profit from your Podcast: Proven Strategies  to Turn Listeners into a Livelihood.” (from Allworth Press, New York)

Thus, this episode was my impromptu review of the contents of the book and the perceived value at first glance from myself, a podcaster of  15 years. Thus, it is a form of “stream-of-consciousness” description, with a few editorial comments. And I do apologize for the extraneous noise from my flipping the pages next to my condenser microphone.

One big bonus is the bonus course from Dave for those who have bought the book. I really look forward to getting the content and resources from this course — and I do plan to report on this later on in an episode.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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442- Value of Screencasting for Podcasters

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on another opportunity for podcasters to grow their audience and include not just “ears” in audio, but also “eyes” in video. This is in the area of videocasting or more commonly known as screencasting.

And we deliver an interview with Lon Naylor, who (in my opinion) is the king of videocasts and screencasts. He has his own membership site called screencapturevideo.com, as well as training programs and webinars for those entrepreneurs and podcasters who wish to enter the video world of screencasting.

As you will hear in this repurposed interview of an audio episode from a previous podcast show, Lon explains what screencasting is, what it consists of, and how a beginner can approach obtaining the skills of being a professional screencaster and video content creator.

Lon also gives some hints and tips to get started from podcasting to screencasting, such as:

  • Use transcriptions to plan your screencast;
  • Start with PowerPoint and migrate to Camtasia Studio for creating video screencasts;
  • Once you have the basics down and have a few videos created, migrate to a good membership site (like screencapturevideo.com) to get training and increase your skills; and
  • create a plan to monetize your new screencasting skills, in addition to your podcasting skills (e.g., as a consultant or to create offerings, products, etc.).

Lon has earned his reputation for being called “The Camtasia Guy” with his skills in MS PowerPoint and with the product from Techsmith.com called Camtasia Studio. And now, he has his membership site with training for both products at screencapturevideo.com .


So, if you wish to enter the area of screencasting and add these skills to your portfolio as a podcaster, then we wish you the best in becoming a great screencaster. If you do subscribe to Lon’s membership site, I am sure that you will see his webinars as great value. And this would be in addition to the available courses to learn the skills with Camtasia Studio (these courses are from Ron Hogue and called Camtasia Mastery).

We hope that your business will increase and that you can get new opportunities in screencasting, in addition to podcasting. All of these can go to make your business more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Lon Naylor of Screencapturevideo.com. All rights reserved.

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441- Podcast Entrepreneur value and work — bad money or good money

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the theme from a recent podcast episode from Evo Terra in Podcast Pontifications show. This theme dealt with the “value equation” vs. opportunity investment in deciding whether to go after and/or accept the business from a client for podcasting services or consultation, etc. In fact, you could even extend that to offering from your web site or business some type of product, service, offering, offer or other type of deliverable to a client for money or other type of value (i.e., barter, quid pro quo, exchange, joint venture, etc.).

Evo goes on to examine the value of “good money” vs. “bad money.” The latter is considered to be compensation from a client that is NOT desirable for you as an entrepreneur or podcaster, because of either moral or ethical views — or perhaps you just don’t like the individual or people or the job itself (that is, you may not enjoy or you may hate doing this type of work and wish it to be over). In fact, the bad money may make your life miserable and may leave a sour taste in your mouth — but because of the financial situation that you have (especially during the plan-demic virus crisis), you may have to accept this type of job or work out of financial necessity.

Now, I myself have had a great deal of “good money.” But I have also had myself a share of “bad money.” And it was not until I got “smart” and decided to place a VALUE into the equation of entrepreneur and podcasting work that I finally realized the difference between that type of work that I DID NOT LIKE TO DO vs. the type of work that I DID NOT WANT TO DO, and thus, REFUSED TO DO.

When you, as a podcast consultant or solutions provider, begin to loathe what you are creating and what you are doing, you can easily fall into the “monkey’s trap” of being stuck doing something you either do not enjoy or cannot see a good future for yourself (in spite of the financial returns). This is a sign that you are chasing after — and accepting — deals that bring with them “bad money.”

Now, in the podcast episode from Evo Terra, not only is this “value equation” described, but he also gives you food for thought about providing your skills to those clients (or potential clients from your online services, products, offerings or offers), but also whether you are in a position to DECLINE the “bad money” and thus set your course for your future to accept less in remuneration, but receive the “good money” that can make your work more valuable to others and your life to have more value to yourself, as well.

We recommend that you consume this episode (either in audio or from the transcript that he provides from his newsletter email), especially the sections that are titled:

  • “The wrong clients eventually bring bad money; and
  • The right clients may never have good money.; and
  • Unexpected clients with unexpected money come from unexpected directions.”

Since this decision is your own judgment call as an entrepreneur and podcaster, it is critical from your self-examination that you can differentiate very clearly the “things you won’t ever want to do vs. the things you don’t want to do forever.”

The latter presents us with a case study of Douglas E. Welch of the podcast show Career Opportunities, who was one of the first podcasters (and whose story we have discussed in prior episodes of this show). He was a computer and local area network consultant, as well as a podcaster and author and writer and blogger. As he stated to me several times, he realized that he should quit wiring cables on his knees and underneath desks for a living and go into the soft skills of New Media content creation, writing, podcasting, blogging, screencasting and video (and gardening) instead. His bodily pain from years of putting “his knees in the breeze” (so to speak) forced him to take a different approach to his livelihood (although perhaps at a lower income level) and reach out for his own “good money.”

So, we recommend that you consume this episode from Evo Terra and then do some self-reflection in your periodic planning to see if your entrepreneurship and podcasting is delivering “good money” now and future “good money” — or if it will imprison you in the jail of “bad money” and dissatisfaction, with the end of the road being a miserable livelihood. As Evo explains in his post and episode, the old quadrant expressed by Steven Covey in The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People can be a good analytical tool to ensure that you can be in the quadrant of “Important but not urgent” instead of letting the tyranny of the urgent drive your actions and run your life. You may want to check out the description and benefits resulting from a view of the quadrant.

So we hope that you can benefit from the discussion of the bad vs. good moneys, and that you can plan your satisfying livelihood as an entrepreneur and podcaster by placing yourself in the quadrant of the “important, but not urgent” status as you steer your business toward being successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Evo Terra and Steven Covey. All rights reserved.

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BONUS – An indirect video can help promote your business and podcast

In this BONUS episode, we discuss a case-in-point that shows how a video that is considered “indirect” can help your business — especially if your entrepreneurship is podcasting or relates to podcasting.

As opposed to a “direct” video that is uploaded to YouTube.com in perhaps your branded channel or personal channel, an “indirect” video is one whose objective and purpose was originally for another party or program that is not yours — but where the popularity and the exposure helped you INDIRECTLY to grow your podcast and grow your business goodwill and promotion.


As my story develops as this example the video that was created was called “Introduce a Bridge Too Far” — and it stuck as my own ID label for YouTube in every type of correspondence in YouTube that occurs to this day (especially in video chat rooms).

In this situation, I had prepared a video that was less than 90 seconds in length and had submitted it in a contest to win the prize of getting to introduce a movie at the Turner Classic Movies Film Festival Conference in the early part of 2014. And the title of the video was promoted by TCM on the YouTube.com site as “Introduce a Bridge Too Far.”

 

 

Now, my introduction to the 1977 Joseph E Levine classic film directed by Richard Attenborough and called “A Bridge Too Far” (which was based on the book by Cornelius Ryan) was posted as one of many who submitted videos in the contest to introduce a classic film. Needless to say, I did not win the contest, and thus I did not get to stand in front of the TCM audience at this conference and present the intro for the film before its showing.

However, the result of the video’s broadcast was the same as a video whose purpose was to go viral. On the first day, there were over 24,000 views, and this grew since October of 2013 until February of 2014. And thus, my exposure from this type of medium was a positive impact to both my podcast show of The Podcast Reporter and The Struggling Entrepreneur and my business of Matrix Solutions Corporation in the areas of content creation, video creation for training and podcast consulting. And much correspondence resulted as feedback from not only the TCM audience, but also thousands of YouTube subscribers who were into classic movies, war movies, TCM, etc. — as well as podcasters and listeners in the podosphere.


So, what may be an opportunity for you to create some content (whether video or audio or blog or any medium) could actually result as serendipity for you to get a very positive result from a random act of participation in an “indirect” medium for other purposes that do result in promotion for your business or your show.

Thus, we hope that you as entrepreneurs or podcasters can also experience serendipity in creating content for your business or podcast with an “indirect” objective that can result as a very positive growth for both your bottom line or your podcast show.

Perhaps maybe you can get the same result as I did — but I hope that you will have a better ID or name that will promote you or your business or show directly (as many people ask me why my name or ID was called “Introduce A Bridge Too Far”.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Cornelius Ryan and Turner Classic Movies and TCM and Joseph E Levine and Richard Attenborough and A Bridge Too Far. All rights reserved.

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440- Podcasting checklists — from Ben K and DJL

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on a recent article from Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com that delivers a checklist and advice on how to prepare for podcast recording — and this is in addition to the podcast pre-flight checklist as given before from Daniel J Lewis in The Audacity to Podcast show. And you can download the free copy of the pre-flight checklist from the link of episode TAP164 from Daniel’s show.

The original podcasting pre-flight checklist

The original podcast pre-flight checklist (before you start the actual recording) was delivered in a podcast episode in 2014 by Daniel J Lewis in episode # TAP164.

I, myself, have used this checklist and have promoted this as a free aid to other podcasters — especially the newer and aspiring podcasters. And this checklist is to confirm that you have prepared for the audio environment and processes before you hit the RECORD button. It does not focus on the CONTENT of your episode (it assumes that you do know what you want to say and how you want to say it).

The Ben Krueger checklist

Ben Krueger

However, this new article from an email delivered from Ben Krueger’s distribution list promotes a free checklist from cashflowpodcasting.com.  The article is called “HOW TO PREPARE FOR A PODCAST EPISODE: WHAT TO DO BEFORE YOU HIT RECORD.” But when I clicked on the link to get access to the free checklist, I received the message that this was not available, even after I entered my name and email address. So, you should be aware of this error from my own attempts. Thus, I could not adequately compare the checklists.

[Editor’s note: after many attempts after I recorded this episode, I finally got the link to the pdf one-pager from Ben Krueger.] And the pdf with the checklist (Copyright (c) 2020, Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com) is:


So, due to this, I review the posting from the link in an email from Ben Krueger that outlines not only what to do prior to start the recording for the episode, but also what to do in order to prepare for the CONTENT of the episode. He discusses what you should plan for in what you are going to record and how to do it. And these are the key points in the Ben Krueger article are the following (with some discussion for each point):

On preparing content

  • He discusses scripting and bullet-points in the planning of the content of the episode;
  • He advises on stories, parables, questions and scenarios for the preparation of content;
  • He finally advises on asking deeper questions to get better answers on interview episodes;

On preparing HOW to record

1. Is your microphone positioned appropriately?

2. Are your audio levels where they’re supposed to be?

3. Is the room ideal for recording?

4. Are you likely to be interrupted?

5. GET RECORDING and hit the record button.

Other resources that Ben points out and gives the links to are those that suggest how to be a better podcast host, as well as perfect podcast equipment.


Now, for this podcast reporter, the pre-flight checklist from Daniel J Lewis is a free resource that is much more comprehensive for the audio preparation of podcasting before you hit the record button. And other checklists that I have seen, including the suggestions mentioned in Ben’s article pale by far in comparison.

However, in addition to the simple bullet points we mention on Ben’s suggestions for the preparation of content, there are numerous episodes in the back-catalog of The Audacity to Podcast show that give hours of detail in the preparation of good content for the genres of podcasting that will help any podcaster to improve the content of any podcast episode. My recommendations, therefore, go to Daniel J Lewis and his back-catalog for a deep dive into preparation for good content in planning a podcast episode.

We hope that these two podcasters and their resources may give you the help you need in preparing the content and the audio environment for you to record great episodes of your podcast show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and Daniel J Lewis of TheAudacitytoPodcast.com. All rights reserved.