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670- Update post-holiday season with Matt our co-host

As you may know, this podcast episode will be posted on both podcast shows, PODCAST REPORTER (at podcastreporter.com) and 2030PODCAST (at 2030podcast.com).

In this post-Holiday season episode of these shows, both Sgt Fred and Matt Cox deliver their greetings at holiday time, but also give a serious prediction for the coming times. Especially for this new year, we are grateful that both of us have survived and recovered from the terrible seasonal flu called “the 100-day cough” and flu.

Some of the topics to be covered here are:

  • Update on health and recovery for now;
  • Status of Camilla and the state of Charles III in the UK;
  • How the border crisis is coming along and the battle with Bo-Jiden;
  • Podcasting and how it is developing in the 21st century — with viewpoints from both Matt and Fred, and how pundits like Adam Curry, John C Dvorak and Daniel J Lewis;
  • Upcoming events for podcasters;
  • Fred’s reunion luncheon from December and the value of reunions
  • Planned travel and enlarging our worlds — but beware of cruise ship travel (as is told by the tales from the series CRUISE SHIP KILLERS);
  • www.radiooutofthepast.org and its origins and current marathons.

Copyright (c) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Adam Curry and John C Dvorak and Daniel J Lewis and Charles III and radiooutofthepast.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

669- How reunions can give incentives for podcasting and small business

In this episode, we deliver an episode that will let you know how we can provide incentives and promote our own podcast shows.

The case-in-point will be from my own experience of having attended a type of reunion recently (i.e., “Golden Cubs” event). This will also relate to three other podcast shows that I have — Grumpy Old Bears, The Struggling Biz and 2030Podcast.


I had the opportunity to attend a reunion-type of event at my old high school (58 years ago). It was a gathering called “Golden Cubs” (since Cubs was our mascot) for those graduates who had graduated 50 years or more ago. The event was great, in my opinion.

At that event, I had not seen my classmates for over 26 years, especially since I had not been to a reunion since 1997, and also I had not traveled to the event due to my being far from its location and always in conflict with my prior career schedule and obligations of travel.

Well, I did get together with some great fellows (this was an all-men high school) and we had a chance to catch up on old times.

In particular, I was able to highlight my past and present career as a serial entrepreneur (after my retirement from corporate America), and I especially emphasized my role as a podcaster (in which I promoted my current 4 podcast shows), as well as my role as a podcast interviewer and as a podcast guest interviewee. This gave me an incentive and delivered excitement to me to describe my four shows. In fact, it was a “great shot in the arm” to give me more motivation and momentum to really enjoy podcasting as I had enjoyed it in the past when I first got into the podosphere.

I was also happy to see that some of my old classmates had also either started podcasting or had created content on YouTube, as well. It made me feel the excitement of almost being in a podcast conference once again — and it was a euphoric experience.

The discussion and meetings in the event lasted over 3 hours, and it left me with my commitment to those who organized the event to join their Zoom calls inbetween Golden Cub anniversaries, as well as the formal reunion events in the future. In fact, I did send emails of gratitude to my old companions, as well as photos of some of the content of my shows. I even sent them images from an episode in a  podcast interview that I did about my experiences after my return from the Vietnam War, in which I served as a Combat Infantryman (NOTE: the image came from both a Veterans magazine photo, as well as the time mark of 59 seconds of a documentary on YouTube called A Tribute to Those who served in Vietnam, which can be reached at the link of: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9if9zOx5NYM

As you can see, the above was from an interview on VietnamVeteranNews.com, episode 2245.)


So, thus, even reunion events can be opportunities for a podcaster to promote his podcast shows, as well as educate others about the podosphere and deliver some links and images as a proof of concept to those classmates that are eager to listen and consume, as well as also share their own podcasting and content-creation experiences.

So, from this podcast reporter and struggling entrepreneur, I strongly encourage the incentive of promoting your shows at these events. It will definitely be a surge of momentum and excitement for you, as a podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation and podcastreporter.com, 2030podcast.com and strugglingbiz.com and VietnamVeteranNews.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

668- When it is time to close a struggling entrepreneur business

In this episode, we shall publicly report that we will be sharing and distributing this episode and its content to both 2030podcast.com and The Struggling Biz podcast show, as well as gumpyoldbears.com. 

We did have a remembrance of the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941,  in a somber way. Too bad that the rest of the country hardly remembers that “day of infamy.”

You can see the album art for several of these podcast shows below:

and

and


So the key question should be:  When is it time to terminate or close down your entrepreneur startup business?

And we will discuss my key startup business, Matrix Solutions Corporation, as the major case-in-point.

In general, what would be some factors or reasons or environments that would have me consider shutting down my entrepreneurial business? We can try to list them, and we can then discuss them.

  • Health conditions;
  • Business customer situations;
  • Entrepreneur desires to continue;
  • Where hobbies are fun and desirable, yet the business environment is not;
  • Business conditions (i.e., paperwork, taxes, documentation and other secretarial-type work);
  • the need to “feel free to pursue other endeavors”; or
  • the need to just be “retired” with no responsibilities to business or requirements of tasks due;
  • and one of the most likely: the need to still be involved in business, but the customer environment and the condition of the business model is not suitable or desirable to pursue; and
  • the cost of keeping the business operating is creating a loss every year, due to customer, product, and other reasons — and this is NOT SUSTAINABLE; and
  • finally review the EXIT STRATEGY and EXIT PLAN for the business in the charter or business plan for the company.

So, one may ponder what needs to be done, what needs to be planned and what needs to be executed within a given time frame to exit the business legally and for good — although you may reserve the right to begin another entrepreneurial business, should a new technology or opportunity strike your desire to pursue another venture (health and other environment conditions permitting).

So we discuss these factors in a writing method commonly called “state of the mind” or additionally, “stream-of-consciousness” styles.

Most important is the condition of my health and the effects on it due to agent orange exposure and injuries caused when I was in Vietnam during the war as a combat infantryman in the jungles, mountains and rice paddies — as well as concussions due to parachute jump landings that caused injuries when I was a paratrooper with my second tour of duty in the 82nd Airborne Division.

As I mentioned, the stream-of-consciousness method was used in the latter part of the discussion recorded. I hope it was meaningful to you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Strugglingbiz.com and 2030podcast.com and grumpyoldbears.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

664- Attempting to rewrite history can lead to a repeat

In these episodes covering both 2030Podcast.com and PodcastReporter.com, we discuss the trend of the newer radical left to avoid reviewing history as it occurred. This year marks a departure from the National Day listings for both August 6th and August 9th — these are the days when the atomic bombs were used against Japan at Horoshima and Nagasaki to put an end to WWII and to save not only 500,000 American lives (i.e., those who would have died invading the Japanese islands), but also the millions of Japanese military and civilians who would have self-sacrificed themselves in the attempt of the invasion that would have begun in November, 1945.

So today is the 9th of August in this year of 2023 — that is, 78 years after the incidents of the use of nuclear weapons against an enemy during WWII.

But no one is batting an eye to remember these events — as they were truly important in the development of the world as it stands today. Remembering them is part of history, and it seems that there is a movement of trying to NOT remember them and pretend that they never occurred — and that we should just look the other way and not pass down the events (and the lessons from these events) to our younger generations.

As what once was said, those who forget history are doomed to repeat it again.

Thank you for your attention and for listening.

Copyright (c) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Hiroshima and Nagasaki. All rights reserved.

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663- Obsession in podcasting can lead to negative results

In this episode that supports both PodcastReporter.com and 2030Podcast.com, we explore from experience how negative results can come from a podcaster who becomes obsessive with podcasting. For the most part, the examples come from my own experience for the last 18 years (when I started getting into podcasting).

The model that many podcasters had since their beginning is the following:

  • First, they publish a podcast show and its first episodes;
  • Their elation is high and they result in excitement and success;
  • They then feel that they must start more podcast shows;
  • Soon, when they get more ideas, they create and publish even more podcast shows;
  • In my experience, I had 16 podcast shows within the first 4 years of podcasting.
  • However, with each new podcast show, I devoted less time to the quality of the content of my flagship podcast shows;
  • I found that I lost time in promoting shows;
  • My interest went into attending, speaking and participating in live inbound podcast show events (e.g., conferences like New Media Show and also podcamp events;
  • My show notes grew very thin and I started losing interest in both content quality and regular consistency in publishing of my then 16 current podcast shows;
  • Thus, I began to podfade each show and reduce the overall time of podcasting, as I felt that I was burning out.

So the net of my experience as that the excitement and thrills in publishing podcast shows grew to a very high level, but the cost of that made my shows suffer in quality, content, consistency — and the end result was that of being close to burnout (especially when I had to travel to attend and present at shows and conferences — especially when I had to prepare the presentation).

I say this only to warn those whose excitement leads them to begin a second or third (or more ) podcast show after having completed their first show and venture into the podosphere. Also, I wish to give a sign to those who start multiple shows and then try to monetize them quickly — within a month to six months — and wonder why their success has not brought them to financial glory.

I myself have had the negative experience of both burnout and unsuccessful shows, as well as negative comments from episode reviews in the past. Now, I did start my last podcast show as a “fun” or “hobby” podcast, with no expectations or promises of consistency or promotion and no expectation nor desire for monetization. It was called the Grumpy Old Bears podcast show, and my co-host has come and gone, then returned and left again — he himself has almost burned himself out and has overwhelmed himself with too many commitments due to the excitement of being involved in numerous projects. And thus, there is NO expectation of commitment from this show, and for us, it is a periodic release of frustration and the ability to just laugh and  mock society and present day events. It is for laughter, and that is why we consider it a “comedy podcast show.”

So from this podcast reporter and struggling entrepreneur, I’d like to thank you for listening, and “we’ll see you next time.”

Copyright (c) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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700A- SWANSONG- 2030 fading – with first interview with Adam Curry

In this episode, we are all saying our farewells to the 2030Podcast.com audience, because like an old soldier, we just “fade away.”

And since our last podcast episode told about the greatest generation, of which I consider myself to be a legacy of that group, I see that bidding farewell to our audience is a great respect.

So, there will be no more controversial topics, etc., but just the memory of the show. And so we deliver to you the beginnings of the 2030podcast.com show, with the creator of the idea for 2030 in a podcast show, the Podfather himself, Adam Curry — from an interview in February of 2015.

We thank Adam Curry for his idea and for what was for us a great entertainment content experience.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation and 2030podcast.com and michaelandmike.com and Adam Curry. All rights reserved.

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podcast

660- Reaction to podcast about possible ICC actions

In this episode, we deliver some content that we wished to produce and distribute on another podcast show, The 2030 Podcast.

However, due to the internet hijacking capabilities, we have run into a roadblock of failures to get to the main menu of the WordPress system to create an episode and then publish it. I do intend to pursue with the original podcast episode on the ICC and ecocide once the problems get resolved from the hijacking and errors caused by intruding parties on the internet content management systems.

So, with your permission, we will use this podcast show to create, deliver and publish what would have been episode 128 for The 2030 Podcast Show and thus, deliver it to you and to our valued guests.

As you may know, I am a subscriber and listener (as well as a past guest and interviewee of the podcast show from Mack Payne, called The Vietnam Veteran News podcast.

In one of his latest episodes (# 2535), Mack goes into the possibility of being held liable for “ecocide” during the Vietnam War, especially in the use of herbicide Agent Orange.

If you are interested in the ICC (i.e., the International Criminal Court) in the Netherlands, then this description of ecocide (as a result of the recent destruction of a dam in Ukraine) may be of significance. In fact, you may have screwball nuts claiming that there is liability from every viewpoint, including climate change. That is, even Greta Thunberg has her 2 cents. But, as I applaud Mack Payne, the podcaster for VietnamVeteranNews.com, I wholeheartedly accept and repeat and agree with what he said about her: (paraphrased) “Who the hell cares what Greta T has to say?”  — because, in my opinion, she is one of the worst influencers in today’s world.


Now, as a Vietnam Veteran myself who served as a combat infantrymen in the war, I was a victim of agent orange (i.e. AO), and I am still today suffering from complications resulting from that.

[Note: If you don’t know what AO is, you may want to do some research and see what this herbicide was and how it was used during the Vietnam War — especially the complications that it caused for the US Veterans who fought there in the jungles, etc.]

You may even think that the use of AO could possibly fit into the definitions of what is currently promoted as “ecocide.”

But this podcast is an example of warnings that could be sent to the US government that the ICC could launch an attack on the USA because of the use of AO some 60 to 70 years ago.

In any case, I myself do not believe that this liability should be even promoted or expanded just to suit the ego of idiots like Greta T., as she is now losing popularity — especially when she is no longer the “cute” little 16-year old with pigtails, as she will always be remembered for her being refused admittance to the Climate meeting and just shouting “blah blah blah” for no reason.


One final note:  if you would enjoy listening to an interview with myself that Mack Payne did earlier about the Vietnam War and PTSD, you may want to go to episode 2245 of Mack’s podcast show (in this URL: https://soundcloud.com/mackpayne-1/episode-2245-vietnam-vet-fred-castanedas-killer-ptsd-remedies?si=2fc717ac53ec4f8c9a1aa5598367d774&utm_source=clipboard&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=social_sharing

The interview is about 45 minutes in length, but it covers four different methods that I used in dealing with PTSD as I tried to recover from the war. I have included the site image of Mack Payne and my interview with him, per the link, above.

Thank you for your attention, and thank you for listening.

Copyright (C) 2023, Matrix Solutions Corporation

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podcast

540- Podcasting website requirements

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review a post by Mark Asquith of rebelbasemedia.io in which he reviews the five “must-have” items for creating a podcast website that will “stand out.”

As an experienced podcaster, I wanted to see what he would include in these necessary items for aspiring podcasters. The reason I did this is that I had seen his video titled “How to record a podcast episode: software and setups for all budgets” — and I was interested in what the absolute requirements were mentioned for a podcasting web site.

Well, I saw the main sections of this blog post about a podcasting web site, and he goes into detail about each one. They were:

  • Include a web magnet (and he refers you to a site that explains how to create a lead magnet;
  • Get involved with your podcast (and he gives several examples, such as contributions, questions or feedback — as well as a private  podcast or bonus feed);
  • Have organized and optimized pages (and he includes a reference to Evo Terra of PodcastPontifications.com as an example:  “Evo Terra’s revamped website places a lot of emphasis on his written content. Every episode has a transcription, full show notes and is tagged to make navigating his vast content library super easy.”);
  • Include a SPONSOR KIT, which should have the following:
    • “What you’ll provide for them – what does a sponsorship include, and how much will it cost?
    • Your previous ad-reads (if you have them)
    • An overview of your stats, including downloads, unique listeners and listener behaviour
    • Information on your demographic and audience
    • A contact form to call to action to get in touch.
    • A link to your PDF sponsor kit.”
  • A guesting page (with speaker and guest profiles and other needed promotional and preparation information pertaining to guests for your show).

And the main conclusion for this post is:  YES, you DO need a podcast website, if you are serious about becoming a professional podcaster and stepping into the world of monetization.


For this podcaster, I have used in the past the models created and espoused and delivered by such pundits as Paul Colligan and others to fill these requirements — and deliver many more for me.

Of course, Mark is monetizing his call to action to have you, the podcaster, engage him to help you create these sites for your podcast show.

Now, you can ensure that you have included these (or something like these) items in your website, or you can farm it out to a third party (of which there are many). But the important things to get out of this post is for you to check against your own show and website to see if you are including — or missing — some of these items. And a good checklist is always a beneficial idea for you, as a podcaster, to review.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Mark Asquith of rebelbasedmedia.io and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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526- Lessons learned after 15 years of Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss my own lessons learned and experiences of value gained from podcasting for the last 15 years, when I became a podcaster — with having been within the podosphere as a listener for the prior 2 years (and with listening to over 100 podcast shows per week, as there were not as many shows as there are now).

In a recent edition of the podnews.net newsletter, we had an article that spoke about what experiences and benefits were learned by someone who had just celebrated seven years in podcasting (you can find it at Bruce Wawrzyniak, the host of Now Hear This who celebrated his 7th anniversary of the show with 367 episodes). Well, as a podcaster with over double the time in the podosphere as an active podcaster, and with over 1000 episodes and 2 million downloads, I wanted to also give you some perspective of an old-timer podcaster.

Now, by old-timer, I don’t mean to state that I was one of the original podcasters when the podosphere started. By no means. There were folks like Gary Leland, Todd Cochrane, CC Chapman, Paul Colligan, Rob Walch and Dave Jackson (among others) that already had podcast shows — and some for almost 2 years since 2004. Among them, I seemed to be a newcomer. And my podcast show that I promoted at the time of the early Podcast and Portable Media conference seemed pale in comparison to the work of those earlier maestros.

But now, after 15 years of podcasting, my current flagship podcast show of PodcastReporter.com has between 500 and 600 episodes; my other show of TheStrugglingBiz.com has over 100 episodes; and my other podcast show of 2030podcast.com has over 50 episodes — and the latter is done with a co-host, Matt Cox (a podcaster with over 12 years of his show, Brunch with the Brits.net).

So the question is: what experiences have I learned from podcasting in 15 years? and what is the suggestion that I deliver to new and aspiring podcasters (even though these will never be posted in the podnews.net newsletter)?

  • I have learned that technical skills are important, but that they are not the most important — what is of greatest importance is the value that your show and its episodes will provide to your audience;
  • I have learned that your communication with your audience is critical — and that goes for any planned or unplanned absences (remember — even great podcasters like Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show disappeared for almost six months without leaving word to his audience of any planned or unplanned absence.  But he later made up for it by publishing an episode explaining his forced absence, and then proceeded to return to the podosphere in many formats. And he keeps being a subject matter expert in his own right);
  • I have received value in the faith and commitment of my audience in staying with me, providing me with feedback and commentary, as well as giving word-of-mouth promotion to others in the podosphere;
  • I have received value in seeing the number of downloads increasing for each show (in fact, both The Struggling Entrepreneur podcast show — which has podfaded — and this show have had over 1 million downloads each, and still growing), as well as the popularity of my shows increasing;
  • I have received value when our 2030podcast.com show received promotion on an international live stream — they played episodes from this show to their audiences; they stated that this was a “quality show” to the audience; and they praised the quality of the audio, as well, to their audience and live stream. And they did this WITHOUT any requests from me or any paid promotion or marketing or sales. This occurred because they found value in the show; and as of the date of this episode, it still continues to be published with various episodes and still continues to receive admiration from listeners who found value in the content of this show, even though none of the serendipity results were planned;
  • I found value in other podcasters whom I have met in person or on the web — either a conferences or in remote interviews which I conducted for many of my 16 concurrent podcast shows that I had in 2010, and which I had to whittle down due to health and personal family issues with which I had to deal in 2016 to 2018;
  • and finally, I learned that the VALUE FOR VALUE model applies to podcasters who deliver good content to listeners. I learned this when the value was “treasure” (i.e., monetization), as well as “tech” (i.e., learning valuable technical skills and models), as well as “frienship” value (i.e., starting great relationships with the pundits of podcasting and other podcasters).

And these are just a few of the lessons learned from this podcaster in my 15 years as a podcaster and 17 years within the podosphere.

So, if you think that seven years is a lot of time to learn about value in podcasting, try learning from the podcasters who have spent more than double that time within their craft. This will help deliver lessons learned to the new and aspiring podcasters, so that they can improve their skills and become better deliverers of value to their audiences.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and 2030podcast.com and Matt Cox. All rights reserved.

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podcast

493- Approaching the twilight years of podcasting — perhaps

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we ask ourselves the perpetual question of:  “When do we approach the ‘twilight years’ of podcasting?” or “Have we reached our twilight years of podcasting?”

This theme was approached once before in 2018, but it is certainly an important issue for those of us who have been podcasting for the last 15 years, as I have. In fact, I started my first podcast when I was in my mid-50s, and I am still continuing to produce podcast episodes for my two main podcast shows, PodcastReporter.com and 2030Podcast.com — as well as adding a newer podcast series called The Struggling Biz.

As you will hear in this audio episode, although there is a lot of personal perspectives and my own history in this episode, it is important for us to reflect that we owe the benefits of podcasting to those who did pioneer the path for us today from the beginning of the podosphere in 2004. Their names are mentioned in this audio episode.

But, as for the senior podcasters involved, the question that has to be answered is:  “Are you in your own twilight years for any type of reason?” and “Are you approaching your own twilight years for podcasting?” I hope this provides some food for thought.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.