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436- Some ways to freshen up Podcasts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver our own perspectives about a topic that came to us from a recent email sent from Squadcast that delivered an article about improving content for podcasters.

The name of the article and post was: “Need to freshen up your podcast? 10 Ways to Improve Your Podcast Content.” This was sent in an email by Rockwell@squadcast.fm.

The article cites ten of the personal favorite suggestions that may help a podcast “freshen up” the podcast. Now, I have been told by others that these are overly simplistic and rather obvious. Well, that may be so. But these are the obvious things that slip our minds when we are putting content together. And some of them may ring a bell in your mind as a reminder to review these suggestions and see if they can, in fact, freshen up your content.

These suggestions have a few descriptive sentences for each of the suggestions. In a short list, they are:

1. Keep listening to a LOT of other podcasts

2. Think back to the stories your family has told you

3. It’s all about curiosity

4. Look to your audience
“Your listeners aren’t just the people who are out there receiving the
content you create. They should be inspiring the content you create.”
… And what’s more inspiring than people?”

5. Pay attention to criticism

6. Create space for inspiration to find you

7. Leverage your skills

8. Diversity

9. Let people share their own stories

10. Stop stressing about “winning”


For this podcaster, the suggestion to focus on your audience and really “look” at them caught my attention. As was stated, they could be the ones who INSPIRE your content, not just the targets that will be consuming your content.

We hope that some of these suggestions would remind you of the importance of your podcast shows, so that you can “freshen up” your podcasts and make them more interesting and be able to increase your audience and deliver more VALUE.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and squadcast.fm. All rights reserved.

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podcast

452- Podcast conferences — change of the guard or agendas

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss an opinion that was promoted on The New Media Show dialog that concerned the podcast conference speakers — naturally, it had to do with the selection results and why the presenters today are possibly in the “changing of the guard” as far as speakers at events.

In the episode # 397 of New Media Show, Todd Cochrane and Rob Greenlee (the co-hosts of the episode) mentioned that a podcaster from a show told them that they should “move out” and let newer podcasters be the presenters at the show. This begs the question of whether speakers should deliver value or just be part of an agenda. In other words, the value of the presentation is diminished, while the agenda and political correctness becomes primary in the decision making process.

For this podcaster, my opinion is that VALUE should be the primary determinant from the viewpoint of the attendees. And for myself, this means that education, training, new strategies and podcasting-relevant topics should deliver value to the podcasters (and that means ALL podcasters, including new and aspiring ones and veterans).

So when I saw the first listing of the speakers selected, it looked to me like the AGENDA and political correctness have sneaked into the selection process, and that the value for education and training for podcasters has now begun to diminish.

I also look at Gary Leland, who was one of the founders of the Podcast Movement conferences, and what he said was the real value to the podcasters — and that meant to provide the excitement for PODCASTING to the podcasters and content creators. There was no room for AGENDAS or political correctness in the selection process, because the excitement and VALUE to the podcasters was primary.

Well, since Gary Leland has left the Podcast Movement team in driving the conferences, the agenda-driven focus has moved in to steer the conference toward agendas. At least, that is my opinion and that is how I see the podosphere today for this conference.


Now, I have purchased my ticket to be an “attendee” at the Podcast Movement Virtual conference. Why? Because I had attended the PM 2014 (and I was a speaker at this conference) event. I also had recently attended the PM Evolutions conference in California in February. So I decided that I would be a virtual attendee at this new virtual event.

For the upcoming PM-Virtual event, I am thankful that at least two speakers will provide great value in the event and are NOT part of an agenda — these are Todd Cochrane and Tom Schwab. And that is just my opinion. But I ask “where are the rest of the experienced podcasters that do deliver value to podcasters in topics in which they are subject matter experts in their field?”

But if the direction goes farther into the AGENDA-driven focus for this conference, I feel that I will perhaps stop participating in this type of event. Why? Because the value for podcasters has begun to decrease, and the value to the AGENDAS has begun to replace this. And so, I will keep my focus on VALUE to the podcaster in terms of education, training, strategies and other value-based themes and topics for ALL podcasters — and not just for the Social Justice Warriors or those who have modern AGENDAS.

So, if the pendulum does swing back to the original themes of PM conferences, then I may go back to supporting that event and participate as an attendee again. But for now, I plan to distance myself from the agenda-driven conferences and steer myself toward the value-based events that do deliver podcasting gems to the attendees.

So thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and NewMediaShow.com. All rights reserved.

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435- Podcasting virtual conferences and their efficacy

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the value of meetings and conferences for entrepreneurs as a result of this virus crisis of 2020 — especially since face-to-face or inbound meetings have always resulted in high value and returns for attendees or participants.

This episode is from the original point of view of this entrepreneur and podcaster — and we zero in on the podcast events and conferences of the past 15 years, with its ROI and value delivered as a result of participation (either as an attendee or a panelist in a session or as a presenter, etc.).

My background with events spans over 40 years — 30 of them in corporate America as an employee of a large multinational, and over 19 years as an entrepreneur. I had attended many events as both a demonstrator and attendee, as well as a presenter in the USA and other countries worldwide. So I have had plenty of experience in what is called “Events Marketing” and have seen the development of new practices and techniques and skills for events — both inbound and outbound (or virtual).

However, with this new plandemic of the virus crisis of 2020, most of the events have been canceled or shut down for the remainder of the year 2020. And even though some of the larger ones tried to reschedule for the latter part of the year, it was still evident that the ROI for the hosting organization of the event would not be realized, and so a cancellation and/or postponement was the only alternative.

Recently, I had participated both as a speaker and an attendee in the podcast conferences — from the New Media Expo (that dealt with all new media, such as blogs, video, screencasting and podcasting, etc.) to the Podcast Movement conferences, etc. And before then, I participated as demonstrator, speaker and attendee at the smaller inbound conferences such as the Podcasting events (e.g., the original Podcast and Portable Media Expo) and smaller Podcamps, etc.


So the question is: now that events have had to switch to a virtual “venue” over the internet, what value has been lost and what value has been gained?

Value Gained — especially ROI

The best part of the virtual conference is really a boon for the bean-counters — or for your budget, if you are a solo-preneur. That is, the SAVINGS in hard dollars that would have been spent in travel, lodging, food, laundry, transportation to and from the event, and other costs associated with inbound conferences that required an entrepreneur to go to an outside venue either to the other side of town or clear across the country (or even another country). The ROI possibility is greatly improved.

In addition, for HEALTH and HYGIENE reasons, the inbound events also save the entrepreneur from virus and health problems. This could be from the air circulated on an aircraft to and from the venue, to the hand-shaking, to the crowds at the event, and to the close proximity of demonstrators in the exhibit area when one is getting a demo of a product or getting information, etc. So there is no problem of contracting any colds or flu or other viruses (especially in late fall and winter times, such as those events in Las Vegas).

But besides the money saved and NOT spent, and besides the avoidance of hygienic and health threats, what are the OTHER values from avoiding the inbound conference?


“Paradise Lost” — especially in relationships and community

You can hear the list of valuable ROI engagements as discussed in recent podcast episodes from Evo Terra of Podcast Pontifications. In this podcast, he discusses the fact that the same type of relationship-building and getting to know someone in person cannot really be duplicated in a Zoom meeting or virtual conference over several days, where the speaker or demonstrator is speaking to a camera and not to a human being.

I agree wholeheartedly with Evo on that account. The last inbound conference I did attend was the Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions event in Los Angeles (just before the lockdown occurred). I was able to re-energize with some of my fellow podcasters, as well as get to know some new contacts in person. The value and the nature of the relationship was unique only to person-to-person engagements and cannot be duplicated over the network with poor quality (as in zoom) or via a one-on-many presentation with poor audio and video. The Q-and-A portion of a virtual event cannot compare to asking a question live in front of the speaker or guest, and then later on catching that individual in the hallway or in the session room to get a one-on-one discussion, as well as handing a business card and asking for an interview, etc.

What seemed to be a great landscape and opportunity to derive value for future engagements, products, services, offerings and especially JOINT VENTURES was something which, unfortunately, I seemed to have taken for granted. And I think a lot of us can “resemble that remark” (as said by the cartoon cat, Garfield).

That great part of the in-person meetings and conferences was LOST — in fact, it seemed to me to be a “paradise lost” (as permitted by Milton) to the entrepreneur.

In addition, as a demonstrator, I was able to influence and promote my products, services, offerings, offers and web site, podcasts and other assets to the attendees and reporters of an event in a most influential way (that got good, measurable results) when I was in the exhibit hall of such a conference. And in the virtual world, this is entirely a situation lost.


The future and Regaining the value

So how can we regain the value of events in this re-defined normal of the world because of this plandemic and virus crisis, both now and after it is over?

For myself, as an entrepreneur and podcaster, I will continue to be VERY skeptical of the events as they go through their growing-up period of availability over the internet. I have already sat through different events, such as the SHIFT event from the PodcastMovement.com team. And for me, this registered as a very low 2 on a scale of 1 to 10, where 10 is excellent.

That does not mean to say that I will not risk to invest in other sessions or events. I have registered for the upcoming and non-refundable Podcast Movement Virtual conference for 2020, just to see how it is and compare it to other events. While I am hoping to get greater value out of that (comparing it to the Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions inbound conference), I am not holding my breath — for I forsee some growing pains still going through their evolution, with the attendees as the losers on this end.

Thus, as long as you, as an entrepreneur, can keep a skeptical eye and know what type of VALUE should be delivered to you by these events, you can be a good judge and critical thinker of their worth to you. And you should be able to see how and what type of improvements are occurring in the world of virtual events.

With your eye on lower costs and your desire to obtain VALUE for your time and attendance (and cost from the entry fee or virtual ticket), you should be able to put together what we have always advised — a COST-BENEFIT-ANALYSIS chart with your expected outcomes and results. And with this, you can make a determination to either wait until the events go back to inbound or to receive the VALUE in some other form of delivery, be it by way of virtual conferences, webinars, calls with others on the network, podcasts, screencasts or other media and technologies.

We hope that you can plan for — and receive — the value you deserve after determining whether or not to participate in some way to a virtual event in the near future. As for myself, I will be skeptical, but I will also reach out to take a low-cost risk to see this new paradigm of events for entrepreneurs.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation  . All rights reserved.

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podcast

455- Podcast guest interviews — a study

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review the results of a study that focused on podcast interviews. This study was presented by Tom Schwab (someone whom we have interviewed before in this series since 2015). His platform is called Interview Valet.

This study was prepared by Tom and delivered at various conferences. In fact, from the current emails from the Podcast Movement Virtual conference announcing the speakers, it seems that Tom will be giving his presentation at the virtual event. In the past, he has delivered this topic at the Podfest Global Summit as a keynote.

But for now, the presentation slide deck can be obtained for free at the web site for Interview Valet.


Now, I have known Tom since 2015. I had even interviewed him in an audio episode in this podcast series about his programs. What intrigued me most about him was that he stated that he did NOT want to be a podcaster and create content in that manner; but that he wanted to grow his prospects and leads by being a GUEST on other podcasts. And so he put together his platform for helping other entrepreneurs become guests on podcasts and then create value in this manner.

As you will see in his free pdf document called “The State of Podcast Interviews – 2020”Tom delivers 16 pages of data from his study to support his programs called “Podcast Guest Profits.” And in this deliverable, Tom presents the DATA as he studied it for podcast interviews, including:

  • The platforms for recording guest interviews and the analytics associated with them;
  • The best days of the week for guest interviews;
  • The duration of the cycle from invitation to the actual recording and from recording to posting the guest interview episode;
  • The breakdown for audio vs. video interviews and even the live interviews; and
  • Some conclusions for future guest interviews in the podosphere.

If you, as a podcaster, wish to include guest interviews, then this data will be a good resource to begin the investigation of the direction you may wish to take in your plans for podcast episodes. And coupled with other podcast resources and information given by others about how to select guests and then prepare for a good interview, you should be able to create good content that will excite your listeners and deliver VALUE to your audience with the topics which they wish to consume and the experts that will be interesting. And this should help to grow your podcast successfully.

As a side note, you yourself may be called upon to be the GUEST and BE INTERVIEWED. And we have a past audio episode from this series that is delivered by Max Flight on the issues and the preparation of being interviewed:


For this podcaster, I had started in 2006 with a podcast guest interview show called The Struggling Entrepreneur, which has unfortunately podfaded after nearly 500 episodes. It has been replaced by a more modern version podcast show called The Struggling Biz. These shows interviewed aspiring entrepreneurs, as well as new entrepreneurs, successful entrepreneurs and those who did not succeed — and each episode presented some lessons learned from multiple angles. We even had interviews with some small business owners that said that they did NOT want to be entrepreneurs, but preferred to stay in their career day-jobs.

So, for myself, guest interviews are helpful for the podcaster — not only in generating interest and delivering quality content, but also in improving your skills as an interviewer, content creator, aspiring journalist and informer (in my case, a Podcast Reporter).

Thus, I wish the best to you in becoming a great interviewer and for creating great episodes in your podcast show with your guests — and in making your podcast show successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Tom Schwab of InterviewValet.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

434A- Podcasting vs Social Media on smart phone

In this repurposed episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the theme delivered originally by Dave Jackson in his School of Podcasting show earlier which compares the effective communication and better business results between Podcasting vs. the Social Media on a smart phone.

This topic came up previously by Dave Jackson in episode # 640, in which he interviewed Paul Colligan of The Podcast Report show.

As you will hear in this repurposed audio episode, there are main differences that define the environment of each platform — podcasts vs. social media. These include the “quick hit” of social media vs. the “listening and consumption of media with intimacy” to the listener. What is interesting for me is that Paul actually compared the landing-and-staying time of the user for each platform, and what this meant to him in the world of new media.

Another theme is the “hype” from social media vs. the full consumption of media in podcasting. In addition, there is a brief description of the “OTG” topic for those of you who may have been contemplating to get “off the grid” in order to improve your mental health — with a key example of the podcaster who has done this (namely, Adam Curry in his show, No Agenda podcast).


We hope that you find this topic relevant and interesting for you, as a podcaster — and especially if you are a profitable podcaster. If so, we hope that the value you find in this discussion will help you select the better platform for your own communication and decide to invest your time in generating content, discussion and other areas of communication.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Paul Colligan and Dave Jackson. All rights reserved.

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434- Dilemma for creativity and innovation in Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver our perspective and historical background when related to the ideas from Clayton M Christensen of his book titled The Innovator’s Dilemma (which you can get in hardcopy or kindle from amazon.com).

As a backgrounder and historical point, we see such companies that had the opportunity to take advantage of future technology and innovation and be true leaders in the fields of:

  • Movie rentals — how Netflix stole the market from Blockbuster, even though the latter had the opportunity to buy the former, but declined;
  • Xerography and copiers — how Xerox stole the market of copiers from IBM, even after IBM had the opportunity to buy the technology and firm that was later a key competitor, Xerox;  and
  • PC Operating systems and portable phones — how google and Apple stole the market of smartphones and search engines from Microsoft.

Now, what about podcasting? Has there been new technology that can now upset the apple cart for podcasting?


Well, in several podcast episodes of Grumpy Old Bens and No Agenda and other tech-focused podcast shows, the example of DeScript is given as the possible next technology to turn the podcast industry and podosphere upside down.

So, if you understand the technologies used with DeScript, do you think that being able to change the text of a text transcript will be revolutionary to change the face of podcasting and force the indie podcasters to become extinct?

For this podcaster, my perspective is that the podosphere is still a level playing field for indie podcasters — this is my opinion. And with the growth of podcasting by the new shows (now over 1 million shows in podcasting), the technology of creating audio from text and including it into a podcast or making an entire show from the audio-generated from transcripts will compete with the following areas of the indie podcasters:

  • the perspective and credits and credentials of the indie podcasters who have gained a reputation and a loyal following in the podosphere;
  • the audio of an accepted podcaster’s character, voice, sense of humor and personality that sets the podcaster apart from anyone else;
  • the loyal fans of podcasting who hate to hear any type of robot-like voice, regardless of how “perfect” it may seem to the newer publications creators (like the millennials);
  • Those listeners who still find value in the older methods of publication and reception of audio podcast episodes and shows and refuse to change; and finally
  •  Those podcasters who still want to continue their workflow in creating and publishing outstanding content for the audiences which they have (and have worked so hard to get over the past 15 years).

So, as the above is only my opinion, I suspect that we all have to keep watching the space of technology in podcasting and see what the newer innovations will be. And perhaps we need to focus on the podcasting tech shows to see if innovations like DeScript will grow (and how fast it will be accepted by the podcast community). Please remember that when blab was available several years ago, many podcasters jumped on this technology and predicted that this would be the game-changer in podcasting for the future — and you saw that this was removed after a year or so from the podosphere.

So, we hope that you keep involved in understanding the technologies that are being created, and the innovations that may change the participation of podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and DeScript.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

431A- Why should one start a podcast in 2020 — Ben Krueger

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver our perspectives of a podcast episode (#E260) which is also an article written by Dennis Brown of the Growth Experts podcast show that highlights Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and wonders if you should start a podcast in what is left this year. The title of the article is “Should you start a podcast in 2020?”

Now, Dennis does give us a good table of contents (with time codes from the audio episode) for his podcast interview episode in which he digs into the details of the question about starting a podcast in 2020 from a business perspective:

2:10 – Why did Ben choose Podcasting as a business 8 years ago?

5:26 – Ben shares to us the scale and size of his podcasting business as of today.

6:17 – He also mentioned some clients that he has been currently working with.

8:35 – Ben picked a business superpower he wished he had.

10:17 – The stats and standing of podcasting as of today in the world.

15:50 – How to be a leader in your podcasting niche.

16:53 – We talked about one of the huge indicators in whether or not podcasting is for you and Dennis’s personal opinion.

19:11 – Why a business podcast is a great channel for the right time and the right type of business.

21:49 – Dennis answered why did he not start a LinkedIn and social selling podcast.

23:36 – The right personality if you want to pursue podcasting as your medium.

26:15 – We talked about podcast types and how long is the duration of a podcast.


We mention this now, as we are about to close the third quarter of 2020 and enter into the last quarter. For many entrepreneurs, they may feel as if it is too late to begin one this year, and they may want to start a podcast in 2021 at the beginning of the year. In this way, the planning will be better, and the economy should pick up after the elections, and the virus crisis should calm down — thus, the outlook may be better for success in a podcast.

Ben Krueger

Ben is an experienced business podcaster, author and consultant. I have known him since 2014 (when I met him at the initial Podcast Movement conference).

Now, you can listen to the audio episode interview from the links given already, and there is a download button for you to download the episode, if you wish. It is a 30MB file, but the audio quality is good.

One interesting item is the “superpower” skill set that is described during the interview. Another one is Ben’s perspective of how to become a leader in a podcasting niche as a starter podcaster.

For this podcaster, I recommend this interview for any aspiring or new podcasters that want to go and be successful in a niche. I feel that the benefit for you could be the generation of ideas and the direction of your niche.


We hope that your podcast niche will be a successful one — and the year 2020 still offers opportunities for the newcomers, even though there are a million different shows available in the podosphere today.

Thank you for your attentions.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger and Dennis Brown. All rights reserved.