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583- Podcasting education free to podcasters shortly

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss an announcement from Daniel J Lewis, podcaster of The Audacity to Podcast show, along with being an author of various training programs (such as My Podcast Reviews), as well as his Podcasters Society membership program.

Daniel J Lewis, award-winning podcaster


This is an announcement for FREE training and education modules that Daniel will be distributing with his email notices shortly. And here are the content modules from Daniel J Lewis’s new free training:

  • “How to make your podcast stand out
  • How to improve your audio quality
  • Quick fixes to improve your podcast
  • How to get more podcast reviews
  • Law-related answers podcasters need
  • Podcasting with cohosts
  • And much more I’m still writing!”

Daniel reassured his audience that the emails will be “short enough that you can read them in only a couple minutes, but still informative and actionable.”

He also wanted each module to stand on its own, without any dependence on earlier modules: “And each of the above are separate miniseries, so if you’re not interested in a particular miniseries, you can easily cancel that one miniseries and be moved on to the next one.”


Now, I have known Daniel personally since 2010. I have interviewed him that year, and I also had met him in person in 2013 at the New Media Expo conference in Las Vegas. Also, I have been interviewed on his show, and he has been my interviewee several times — not only as a struggling entrepreneur, but also for more details on his membership program, Podcasters Society.

I have always regarded Daniel as a very technically competent podcaster and content creator. His attention to detail and his specific deconstruction of technical facts is second to none. And so, I have  trusted his comments, counsel and recommendations. So, would I expect great value from something FREE from him?

Absolutely.

By the way, in an earlier episode last week of the Ask the Podcast Coach show, I asked Daniel when he would have a future episode of his flagship podcast, The Audacity to Podcast. And he replied that he was going to announce something soon to announce to us.

So, thus, I am passing this announcement to my audience so that everyone may be prepared to receive the free email content. I do predict that there will be great VALUE in them for both older podcasters, as well as the new and aspiring podcasters.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Daniel J Lewis. All rights reserved.

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526- Lessons learned after 15 years of Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss my own lessons learned and experiences of value gained from podcasting for the last 15 years, when I became a podcaster — with having been within the podosphere as a listener for the prior 2 years (and with listening to over 100 podcast shows per week, as there were not as many shows as there are now).

In a recent edition of the podnews.net newsletter, we had an article that spoke about what experiences and benefits were learned by someone who had just celebrated seven years in podcasting (you can find it at Bruce Wawrzyniak, the host of Now Hear This who celebrated his 7th anniversary of the show with 367 episodes). Well, as a podcaster with over double the time in the podosphere as an active podcaster, and with over 1000 episodes and 2 million downloads, I wanted to also give you some perspective of an old-timer podcaster.

Now, by old-timer, I don’t mean to state that I was one of the original podcasters when the podosphere started. By no means. There were folks like Gary Leland, Todd Cochrane, CC Chapman, Paul Colligan, Rob Walch and Dave Jackson (among others) that already had podcast shows — and some for almost 2 years since 2004. Among them, I seemed to be a newcomer. And my podcast show that I promoted at the time of the early Podcast and Portable Media conference seemed pale in comparison to the work of those earlier maestros.

But now, after 15 years of podcasting, my current flagship podcast show of PodcastReporter.com has between 500 and 600 episodes; my other show of TheStrugglingBiz.com has over 100 episodes; and my other podcast show of 2030podcast.com has over 50 episodes — and the latter is done with a co-host, Matt Cox (a podcaster with over 12 years of his show, Brunch with the Brits.net).

So the question is: what experiences have I learned from podcasting in 15 years? and what is the suggestion that I deliver to new and aspiring podcasters (even though these will never be posted in the podnews.net newsletter)?

  • I have learned that technical skills are important, but that they are not the most important — what is of greatest importance is the value that your show and its episodes will provide to your audience;
  • I have learned that your communication with your audience is critical — and that goes for any planned or unplanned absences (remember — even great podcasters like Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show disappeared for almost six months without leaving word to his audience of any planned or unplanned absence.  But he later made up for it by publishing an episode explaining his forced absence, and then proceeded to return to the podosphere in many formats. And he keeps being a subject matter expert in his own right);
  • I have received value in the faith and commitment of my audience in staying with me, providing me with feedback and commentary, as well as giving word-of-mouth promotion to others in the podosphere;
  • I have received value in seeing the number of downloads increasing for each show (in fact, both The Struggling Entrepreneur podcast show — which has podfaded — and this show have had over 1 million downloads each, and still growing), as well as the popularity of my shows increasing;
  • I have received value when our 2030podcast.com show received promotion on an international live stream — they played episodes from this show to their audiences; they stated that this was a “quality show” to the audience; and they praised the quality of the audio, as well, to their audience and live stream. And they did this WITHOUT any requests from me or any paid promotion or marketing or sales. This occurred because they found value in the show; and as of the date of this episode, it still continues to be published with various episodes and still continues to receive admiration from listeners who found value in the content of this show, even though none of the serendipity results were planned;
  • I found value in other podcasters whom I have met in person or on the web — either a conferences or in remote interviews which I conducted for many of my 16 concurrent podcast shows that I had in 2010, and which I had to whittle down due to health and personal family issues with which I had to deal in 2016 to 2018;
  • and finally, I learned that the VALUE FOR VALUE model applies to podcasters who deliver good content to listeners. I learned this when the value was “treasure” (i.e., monetization), as well as “tech” (i.e., learning valuable technical skills and models), as well as “frienship” value (i.e., starting great relationships with the pundits of podcasting and other podcasters).

And these are just a few of the lessons learned from this podcaster in my 15 years as a podcaster and 17 years within the podosphere.

So, if you think that seven years is a lot of time to learn about value in podcasting, try learning from the podcasters who have spent more than double that time within their craft. This will help deliver lessons learned to the new and aspiring podcasters, so that they can improve their skills and become better deliverers of value to their audiences.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and 2030podcast.com and Matt Cox. All rights reserved.

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520- Podcast workflow optimization can benefit your episodes

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the topic of podcast workflow — in particular, what it is and perhaps some advice on how to manage it from an article in medium.com.

First, the article tries to level-set the podcaster of a typical workflow for podcasting and give the sequence of tasks for a workflow:

“…let’s take a quick look at an example of what a podcasting workflow might look like:

  •  Podcast episode ideation phase;
  • Decide on episode subject and search for guest possibilities;
  • Schedule interviews;
  • Write questions and/or outline of the episode;
  • Record the episode;
  • Edit the show;
  • Load episode to your podcast host to share with iTunes/Stitcher/Google Play etc.;
  • Create show notes for your website;
  • Begin promoting the show via social media, your email list, on your website, etc.;
  • Follow up with guest(s) about the show.”

And the article also suggests that you should have a software management tool: “We recommend using a tool such as TrelloAsanaMonday.com or some other similar software to keep track of your tasks.” In fact, there is a screen shot that is included to help you imagine the management tool in action during your tasks of podcasting. Also, there is a case in point of a podcast using Trello, with additional screen shots to help you along.

And finally, the idea of delegation of tasks could offload the amount of time and effort and work in your workflow, so that you can spend more time on your podcast content — especially with examples of scheduling, social media software and email software, along with other tool recommendations (like editing software).

The article then suggests going to a community of podcasters and picking the brains of others in order to get best practices and advice on what works in good workflow. In addition, going to colleges to get assistance is advised, along with using Fiverr and other sites to take responsibility for getting some of the tasks outsourced. The reason for all this advice is to keep your sacred message and content free from the obstruction of time-consuming and inefficient workflows.


Now, just as you will hear in the automobile and gasoline adds, “your mileage may vary” — the same applies here. For this podcaster, my workflow has developed since 2006 to the present. I have tried using software tools and also found the ones that work best for my model, my content and my own perspective — and I have saved time, effort, money and frustration. Pretty soon, you can get a good idea of how long the tasks will take in your average workflow from the ideation phase to the final post-publication and syndication phase that will include feedback, archiving, marketing, promotion, accounting and any other possible documentation you may need to do.

As I mentioned earlier, each person will have a different workflow, and in podcasting not one size fits all. In fact, a key time that I mentioned workflow in an exchange of ideas was in a post-interview conversation I had with Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast in 2010. In fact, besides sharing our tasks and some other spots in workflow, we both received the benefit of best practices. And then, as a result of our discussion, Daniel then produced and posted a very good podcast episode on workflow for podcasting in his podcast show. I realized that perhaps it would be a good idea to write out and document the workflow, so that I can always go back to it and modify it when another BFO (i.e., “blind flash of the obvious”) appears and will be a good step to include, even through serendipity. If you go to Daniel’s  back catalog, you can find the episode in his archives that deals with workflow creation and execution for the best podcasting efforts.

I sincerely hope that you consider your own workflow, and I hope that this episode can help you to reflect, document, and improve your own workflow to improve your show and make you a more successful podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and medium.com. All rights reserved.

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514- Considerations for podfading — some strategies to deal with it

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we repurpose a previous episode that deals with a review of many considerations for podfading. If you are experiencing some of the symptoms described in this audio episode, we deliver some strategies to deal with the beginnings of podfading and perhaps avoid it altogether.

As you will hear in this audio episode, the 35 minutes are spent with descriptions that lead us to consider podfading and then think about some strategies to either podfade in the right way or to deal with the thoughts of podfading and not do so because of a resurrection of the passion and the good environment that may exist for you.

We give some good examples of podcasters who have created other businesses and podcast networks and communities — such as Daniel J Lewis and his Podcasters Society. And we deal with situations where you may have a co-host — e.g., the No Agenda Show with Adam Curry and John C Dvorak.

We hope that this evergreen content can assist you in any way so that any possible thoughts of podfading (for whatever reason cited) can be dealt with in a positive manner that will help you overcome the environment that leads to this thinking, and then help you to steer your shows and your business in the right direction for you to become successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis and PodcastersSociety.com and noagendashow.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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511- Some lessons podcasters can learn from D-Day

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we contemplate on some possible lessons learned from the experience of D-Day on June 6, 1944. And this is especially memorable, as this episode is being published the day before the 77th anniversary of Operation Overlord — i.e., the invasion of France in World War II (both the airborne and the sea-landing operations).

(1) You should not plan everything to the nth detail and not budge for any reason — as this may cause delay and unnecessary frustration of correcting the content over and over again. Some thoughts on this are:

  • Daniel J Lewis tried to edit his initial podcast episodes so that they would be absolutely perfect — but this led him to delay launching his show and posting episodes for over a year. This delay was really a negative blot on his history and it just slowed down his success.
  • If you fall for this type of negative situation, you would then be subject to the syndrome that Charlie “Tremendous” Jones (a sales and motivational speaker) calls the “Production to Perfection” model. If you have this type of situation, then you may NEVER get around to publishing your relevant content. Because the content can go stale, your edits may not become relevant and never be used. Why? Because you will be saying to yourself “Just one more tweak; oh, and another tweak…” and then your episode may never see the light of day, because perfection is something that does not really exist in our worlds.
  • In D-Day, the plans were so extensive that this military operation was the most detailed project in the history of the world (with a close second being the Apollo 11 project — the launch to the moon in 1969). But when the paratroopers landed in the flooded fields, and when the beaches were hit with the landing barges — then all the best laid plans of the allies were worthless. It was the initiative of the landing forces and the paratroopers that changed their plans to suit the new situation that saved the day for the Allies.
  • So, too, can your podcast shows be “just good enough” to publish, and then you can chalk up the learning that you have from your current episodes to improve the next episode and use that experience to help your workflow and practices become better. You will see that your audience will be understanding, especially if your show is new. Thus, get started when you feel it is appropriate — and NOT perfect — and publish your episodes. You don’t want to wallow in the podosphere aimlessly when your perfect planning seems to go wrong and you must adapt to the conditions of reality for getting your show off the ground and improving it for the next episode.

(2) You should be open for new and changed ideas, in spite of plans that have gone wrong, to continue your show with good content.

  • In D-Day, the American 4th Infantry Division landed on the wrong beach. Did this stop the advance? Not in the least. As the Assistant Division commander said on the beach when confronted with the possibility that the reinforcements may land on the correct beach and not the wrong beach: “The reinforcements will have to follow us, no matter where we go. We are starting the war from right here. Let’s go inland.” (dialogue taken from the book and the movie from Cornelius Ryan’s content of The Longest Day).
  • So, too, you can learn and adapt from the situations from which you learn when you are thrown into a new area that you did not plan for, and when you encounter new possibilities. You may end up telling yourself that this is where you start, and you can then incorporate new experiences into your workflow and content creation, content publication and content promotion and marketing.

And there are other instances where either serendipity or a rude awakening can ignite new and better ways for you to deal with the speed-bump or road-block that you may encounter in podcasting.

We hope that these lessons from D-Day can help you to adapt any potential derailment of your podcast plans and help shape them into a new workflow that will not only improve your podcast development and publication, but also help to make you a more successful podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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531- Podcasting growth — over 2 million podcast shows

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the news that podcasting had reached a milestone months earlier — which is more than 2 million shows in April, 2021. This is important for each podcaster — but this can be a double-edged sword. In addition to going more mainstream, this can be a dilemma for a podcaster, because now it becomes very difficult to be known in the podosphere, as well as getting more listeners in audio for your show.

This was discussed in an April, 2021 email from Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com to his email list, in which he titled the content “This month in podcasting.”

In summary, Ben wrote:

“Hi friends, 
This month the podcast industry reached a new exciting milestone by officially hitting 2 million shows on Apple Podcasts, according to Podcast Industry Insights courtesy of Daniel J. Lewis. This means that after a decade of audience growth, podcasting remains an extremely appealing and ever-growing advertising platform for your business. 

As the industry becomes increasingly more mainstream, this platform gives you an opportunity to connect with your audience on a more personal level, therefore allowing for more trust and commitment to your company, product, or brand. While your followers may otherwise feel overwhelmed with visual inputs or marketing tactics, this will give you the upper hand.

So how can you continue to show up for your audience in a way that provides them with enough valuable content that they want to keep coming back for more and share with their loved ones? Here are a few of our tips:

  • Engage with your audience. Be responsive. Let your listeners know you’re there for them. Try to make it as easy as possible for them to provide feedback, ask questions, or make topic recommendations.

  • Write top-notch show notes. For some of you, this might be a new venture as you start your podcast. Copywriting can be daunting and overwhelming. We suggest including a brief summary of the episode, top takeaways, links and resources mentioned, guest bios, and of course ending with a call-to-action. If this seems a little too stressful for you to attempt on your own, we also provide this as a service to our clients. You can learn more here.

  • Provide good quality audio. Try to minimize background noise and avoid raising or lowering your voice too much as you speak. Recording in a padded or smaller room often helps. We also recommend using a pop filter to remove plosives and making sure the level on your microphone is not too “hot.” Again, if you have questions, please let us know. We are happy to help! …

Some of you may be aware that Libsyn recently launched the 5th version of their publishing interface to their Beta community. It appears they officially launched it as a public beta on March 30th. You can take a sneak peak at what the new layout will look like HERE. This is what they stated in their recent email:

“ ‘This means that at this time new customers will initially be directed to the new interface at five.libsyn.com after account creation. All customers will be able to switch back and forth between the current interface and Libsyn 5 via available dashboard links. Remember Libsyn 5 is still in Beta, so there are features that may be in your current workflow that are not in Libsyn 5. They are coming and so many other good things. The new updated interface is available to libsyn.com customers and is not available for LibsynPRO customers at this time.’ ”

Ben Krueger

And, of course, Ben will update the status of Libsyn5 to his email list subscribers — and we will forward the news to you via this podcast show.

As we have stated several times in this podcast series, we respect Ben and his contributions to the podosphere, in not only educating aspiring podcasters or those who wish to make their shows better, but also for delivering many times free contributions in the form of pdf files and other content that are genuinely gold nuggets that aid recently published podcasters to improve their show.

But for the podcaster, the other side of the good news for the podosphere is that now, aspiring and current podcasters must create realistic strategies that will attract even more listeners and have them subscribe (or “follow” as the new term emerges from Apple) your own podcast shows, so that you may engage with your audience (as Ben suggests) with good audio and excellent show notes.

So we hope that you can put together some strategies that will help you to improve your show and generate the kind of listener growth that you will prefer and enjoy, and that your show will not only be popular — but with suggestions from podcasters like Ben, you can also then be successful in your strategies and action items to monetize your show in your business.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and Daniel J Lewis of theaudacitytopodcast.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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440- Podcasting checklists — from Ben K and DJL

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on a recent article from Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com that delivers a checklist and advice on how to prepare for podcast recording — and this is in addition to the podcast pre-flight checklist as given before from Daniel J Lewis in The Audacity to Podcast show. And you can download the free copy of the pre-flight checklist from the link of episode TAP164 from Daniel’s show.

The original podcasting pre-flight checklist

The original podcast pre-flight checklist (before you start the actual recording) was delivered in a podcast episode in 2014 by Daniel J Lewis in episode # TAP164.

I, myself, have used this checklist and have promoted this as a free aid to other podcasters — especially the newer and aspiring podcasters. And this checklist is to confirm that you have prepared for the audio environment and processes before you hit the RECORD button. It does not focus on the CONTENT of your episode (it assumes that you do know what you want to say and how you want to say it).

The Ben Krueger checklist

Ben Krueger

However, this new article from an email delivered from Ben Krueger’s distribution list promotes a free checklist from cashflowpodcasting.com.  The article is called “HOW TO PREPARE FOR A PODCAST EPISODE: WHAT TO DO BEFORE YOU HIT RECORD.” But when I clicked on the link to get access to the free checklist, I received the message that this was not available, even after I entered my name and email address. So, you should be aware of this error from my own attempts. Thus, I could not adequately compare the checklists.

[Editor’s note: after many attempts after I recorded this episode, I finally got the link to the pdf one-pager from Ben Krueger.] And the pdf with the checklist (Copyright (c) 2020, Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com) is:


So, due to this, I review the posting from the link in an email from Ben Krueger that outlines not only what to do prior to start the recording for the episode, but also what to do in order to prepare for the CONTENT of the episode. He discusses what you should plan for in what you are going to record and how to do it. And these are the key points in the Ben Krueger article are the following (with some discussion for each point):

On preparing content

  • He discusses scripting and bullet-points in the planning of the content of the episode;
  • He advises on stories, parables, questions and scenarios for the preparation of content;
  • He finally advises on asking deeper questions to get better answers on interview episodes;

On preparing HOW to record

1. Is your microphone positioned appropriately?

2. Are your audio levels where they’re supposed to be?

3. Is the room ideal for recording?

4. Are you likely to be interrupted?

5. GET RECORDING and hit the record button.

Other resources that Ben points out and gives the links to are those that suggest how to be a better podcast host, as well as perfect podcast equipment.


Now, for this podcast reporter, the pre-flight checklist from Daniel J Lewis is a free resource that is much more comprehensive for the audio preparation of podcasting before you hit the record button. And other checklists that I have seen, including the suggestions mentioned in Ben’s article pale by far in comparison.

However, in addition to the simple bullet points we mention on Ben’s suggestions for the preparation of content, there are numerous episodes in the back-catalog of The Audacity to Podcast show that give hours of detail in the preparation of good content for the genres of podcasting that will help any podcaster to improve the content of any podcast episode. My recommendations, therefore, go to Daniel J Lewis and his back-catalog for a deep dive into preparation for good content in planning a podcast episode.

We hope that these two podcasters and their resources may give you the help you need in preparing the content and the audio environment for you to record great episodes of your podcast show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and Daniel J Lewis of TheAudacitytoPodcast.com. All rights reserved.

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434- Dilemma for creativity and innovation in Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver our perspective and historical background when related to the ideas from Clayton M Christensen of his book titled The Innovator’s Dilemma (which you can get in hardcopy or kindle from amazon.com).

As a backgrounder and historical point, we see such companies that had the opportunity to take advantage of future technology and innovation and be true leaders in the fields of:

  • Movie rentals — how Netflix stole the market from Blockbuster, even though the latter had the opportunity to buy the former, but declined;
  • Xerography and copiers — how Xerox stole the market of copiers from IBM, even after IBM had the opportunity to buy the technology and firm that was later a key competitor, Xerox;  and
  • PC Operating systems and portable phones — how google and Apple stole the market of smartphones and search engines from Microsoft.

Now, what about podcasting? Has there been new technology that can now upset the apple cart for podcasting?


Well, in several podcast episodes of Grumpy Old Bens and No Agenda and other tech-focused podcast shows, the example of DeScript is given as the possible next technology to turn the podcast industry and podosphere upside down.

So, if you understand the technologies used with DeScript, do you think that being able to change the text of a text transcript will be revolutionary to change the face of podcasting and force the indie podcasters to become extinct?

For this podcaster, my perspective is that the podosphere is still a level playing field for indie podcasters — this is my opinion. And with the growth of podcasting by the new shows (now over 1 million shows in podcasting), the technology of creating audio from text and including it into a podcast or making an entire show from the audio-generated from transcripts will compete with the following areas of the indie podcasters:

  • the perspective and credits and credentials of the indie podcasters who have gained a reputation and a loyal following in the podosphere;
  • the audio of an accepted podcaster’s character, voice, sense of humor and personality that sets the podcaster apart from anyone else;
  • the loyal fans of podcasting who hate to hear any type of robot-like voice, regardless of how “perfect” it may seem to the newer publications creators (like the millennials);
  • Those listeners who still find value in the older methods of publication and reception of audio podcast episodes and shows and refuse to change; and finally
  •  Those podcasters who still want to continue their workflow in creating and publishing outstanding content for the audiences which they have (and have worked so hard to get over the past 15 years).

So, as the above is only my opinion, I suspect that we all have to keep watching the space of technology in podcasting and see what the newer innovations will be. And perhaps we need to focus on the podcasting tech shows to see if innovations like DeScript will grow (and how fast it will be accepted by the podcast community). Please remember that when blab was available several years ago, many podcasters jumped on this technology and predicted that this would be the game-changer in podcasting for the future — and you saw that this was removed after a year or so from the podosphere.

So, we hope that you keep involved in understanding the technologies that are being created, and the innovations that may change the participation of podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and DeScript.com . All rights reserved.

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432- Getting sponsors for Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some suggestions delivered by several well-known podcasters on the theme of acquiring sponsors for your podcast. These suggestions were delivered in a July, 2020, post specified in email delivered to a distributiion list that was titled “4 Industry Experts On How to Get Podcast Sponsors.” And it was published by Captivate.com. From M. Asquith, “Captivate is a Rebel Base Media platform, made with  in the U.K.”

The four experts cited are:

This article was quite long in its explanation. But for me, hearing from both Evo Terra and Daniel J Lewis interested me. Not only are they long-time associates of mine and podcasters whom I have interviewed over the past 15 years, but their sincerity and their expertise is always acclaimed by myself in promoting them forward.

In fact, sponsorship is a theme for monetization for which they have been dealing and in which they have much experience. But I feel that they left out a key expert in this field from the Blubrry network, namely Todd Cochrane of the New Media Show podcast.


So this article answers the key question of  “How do you get Podcast Sponsors for your show?” as presented to these four individuals.

And so here is a brief list of their responses (and there are a few paragraphs to explain each response):

1. Do… Think About If Podcast Sponsorship Is Right For You
2. Don’t… Forget About Your Listeners
3. Do… Use Social Proof
4. Don’t… Be Afraid To Ask!
5. Do… Prepare Your Podcast Sponsorship Pitch
[Note:  according to the author, this may sound easy, and he says it actually is — with the following items being addressed in his “sponsor kit” — and his final message:
6. Putting It All Together: How to Find
Podcast Sponsors:
“Getting there is simple: keep it relevant, keep it entertaining, and most of all:
be confident that your podcast and audience is valuable.”

Now, Mark Asquith has been a relevant speaker at the Podcast Movement conferences and different events — and I myself saw his presentation at the last inbound Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions conference. He has had success in gaining notoriety.

And so, from some of the top experts with experience in the field of sponsorship, I would suggest that you consume the content of this post. And if your marketing and sales plans for your business contain the element of sponsorship for monetizing your podcasts, then this may be a gem waiting for your to create elements in your checklist for marketing tactics. And we hope that this will help your podcast become more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Mark Asquith . All rights reserved.

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430- Podcasting lessons learned after 100 episodes

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on an article published recently and authored by Denis Murphy called “11 Lessons from 100 Podcast Episodes.”

The link given in the published article is from medium.com.

Now, as I have been podcasting for 15 years, this article interested me, for I have had over 18 podcast shows, and I have had nearly 2 million downloads. And I wanted to compare my lessons learned after some shows that have had nearly 500 episodes (both The Struggling Entrepreneur, as well as my current podcast show of The Podcast Reporter with over 430 episodes).

From this article, the 11 lessons learned are:

  1. Solo episodes;
  2. Reach out to potential guests more than once;
  3. Most podcasts don’t even get past 7 episodes;
  4. Most days you feel like an idiot;
  5. You reconnect with your real voice;
  6. Discover your why;
  7. Other people’s assumptions and experiences;
  8. Treat social media as an ongoing experiment;
  9. You don’t need to earn money;
  10. You don’t need a huge audience;
  11. A personal development vehicle.

And each section contains a couple of paragraphs to explain just what the learned lessons provided as value to Denis Murphy as the podcaster.


However, for this podcaster, I have learned many lessons since 2006 — and I keep on learning lessons from my involvement and participation in the podosphere still today, as well as the future.

In addition, I do take issue from my own experience with several of Murphy’s lessons — in particular, numbers 4, 9 and 10. That is,

  • I have NEVER felt like an idiot when I participated as a podcaster in the podosphere;
  • I have tried to earn money, and I have been successful as a profitable podcaster; and
  • I have grown a large audience in the podosphere, with nearly 2 million downloads.

Thus, if you, as a new or aspiring podcaster, want to get some best practices, I would go to another source to see what some of them are, in spite of Mr. Murphy’s personal lessons learned. One such podcast show that gives a lot of best practices is The Audacity to Podcast from Daniel J Lewis; another is The School of Podcasting from Dave Jackson; and one last show is The New Media Show from Todd Cochrane.

As a matter of fact, this episode is giving me some impetus to prepare and publish an episode in this show for the future that will deliver to my audience MY OWN lessons learned after over 1500 podcast episodes from all my shows. Keep watching this space for any news of this upcoming episode later this year.

We do suggest that you read this article from Mr.  Muphy, but then we recommend that you put together YOUR OWN list of lessons which you yourself have learned in any number of key podcast episodes which can mean value and importance to you.

Thank you for your attention.

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