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434- Dilemma for creativity and innovation in Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver our perspective and historical background when related to the ideas from Clayton M Christensen of his book titled The Innovator’s Dilemma (which you can get in hardcopy or kindle from amazon.com).

As a backgrounder and historical point, we see such companies that had the opportunity to take advantage of future technology and innovation and be true leaders in the fields of:

  • Movie rentals — how Netflix stole the market from Blockbuster, even though the latter had the opportunity to buy the former, but declined;
  • Xerography and copiers — how Xerox stole the market of copiers from IBM, even after IBM had the opportunity to buy the technology and firm that was later a key competitor, Xerox;  and
  • PC Operating systems and portable phones — how google and Apple stole the market of smartphones and search engines from Microsoft.

Now, what about podcasting? Has there been new technology that can now upset the apple cart for podcasting?


Well, in several podcast episodes of Grumpy Old Bens and No Agenda and other tech-focused podcast shows, the example of DeScript is given as the possible next technology to turn the podcast industry and podosphere upside down.

So, if you understand the technologies used with DeScript, do you think that being able to change the text of a text transcript will be revolutionary to change the face of podcasting and force the indie podcasters to become extinct?

For this podcaster, my perspective is that the podosphere is still a level playing field for indie podcasters — this is my opinion. And with the growth of podcasting by the new shows (now over 1 million shows in podcasting), the technology of creating audio from text and including it into a podcast or making an entire show from the audio-generated from transcripts will compete with the following areas of the indie podcasters:

  • the perspective and credits and credentials of the indie podcasters who have gained a reputation and a loyal following in the podosphere;
  • the audio of an accepted podcaster’s character, voice, sense of humor and personality that sets the podcaster apart from anyone else;
  • the loyal fans of podcasting who hate to hear any type of robot-like voice, regardless of how “perfect” it may seem to the newer publications creators (like the millennials);
  • Those listeners who still find value in the older methods of publication and reception of audio podcast episodes and shows and refuse to change; and finally
  •  Those podcasters who still want to continue their workflow in creating and publishing outstanding content for the audiences which they have (and have worked so hard to get over the past 15 years).

So, as the above is only my opinion, I suspect that we all have to keep watching the space of technology in podcasting and see what the newer innovations will be. And perhaps we need to focus on the podcasting tech shows to see if innovations like DeScript will grow (and how fast it will be accepted by the podcast community). Please remember that when blab was available several years ago, many podcasters jumped on this technology and predicted that this would be the game-changer in podcasting for the future — and you saw that this was removed after a year or so from the podosphere.

So, we hope that you keep involved in understanding the technologies that are being created, and the innovations that may change the participation of podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and DeScript.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

432- Getting sponsors for Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some suggestions delivered by several well-known podcasters on the theme of acquiring sponsors for your podcast. These suggestions were delivered in a July, 2020, post specified in email delivered to a distributiion list that was titled “4 Industry Experts On How to Get Podcast Sponsors.” And it was published by Captivate.com. From M. Asquith, “Captivate is a Rebel Base Media platform, made with  in the U.K.”

The four experts cited are:

This article was quite long in its explanation. But for me, hearing from both Evo Terra and Daniel J Lewis interested me. Not only are they long-time associates of mine and podcasters whom I have interviewed over the past 15 years, but their sincerity and their expertise is always acclaimed by myself in promoting them forward.

In fact, sponsorship is a theme for monetization for which they have been dealing and in which they have much experience. But I feel that they left out a key expert in this field from the Blubrry network, namely Todd Cochrane of the New Media Show podcast.


So this article answers the key question of  “How do you get Podcast Sponsors for your show?” as presented to these four individuals.

And so here is a brief list of their responses (and there are a few paragraphs to explain each response):

1. Do… Think About If Podcast Sponsorship Is Right For You
2. Don’t… Forget About Your Listeners
3. Do… Use Social Proof
4. Don’t… Be Afraid To Ask!
5. Do… Prepare Your Podcast Sponsorship Pitch
[Note:  according to the author, this may sound easy, and he says it actually is — with the following items being addressed in his “sponsor kit” — and his final message:
6. Putting It All Together: How to Find
Podcast Sponsors:
“Getting there is simple: keep it relevant, keep it entertaining, and most of all:
be confident that your podcast and audience is valuable.”

Now, Mark Asquith has been a relevant speaker at the Podcast Movement conferences and different events — and I myself saw his presentation at the last inbound Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions conference. He has had success in gaining notoriety.

And so, from some of the top experts with experience in the field of sponsorship, I would suggest that you consume the content of this post. And if your marketing and sales plans for your business contain the element of sponsorship for monetizing your podcasts, then this may be a gem waiting for your to create elements in your checklist for marketing tactics. And we hope that this will help your podcast become more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Mark Asquith . All rights reserved.

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podcast

430- Podcasting lessons learned after 100 episodes

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on an article published recently and authored by Denis Murphy called “11 Lessons from 100 Podcast Episodes.”

The link given in the published article is from medium.com.

Now, as I have been podcasting for 15 years, this article interested me, for I have had over 18 podcast shows, and I have had nearly 2 million downloads. And I wanted to compare my lessons learned after some shows that have had nearly 500 episodes (both The Struggling Entrepreneur, as well as my current podcast show of The Podcast Reporter with over 430 episodes).

From this article, the 11 lessons learned are:

  1. Solo episodes;
  2. Reach out to potential guests more than once;
  3. Most podcasts don’t even get past 7 episodes;
  4. Most days you feel like an idiot;
  5. You reconnect with your real voice;
  6. Discover your why;
  7. Other people’s assumptions and experiences;
  8. Treat social media as an ongoing experiment;
  9. You don’t need to earn money;
  10. You don’t need a huge audience;
  11. A personal development vehicle.

And each section contains a couple of paragraphs to explain just what the learned lessons provided as value to Denis Murphy as the podcaster.


However, for this podcaster, I have learned many lessons since 2006 — and I keep on learning lessons from my involvement and participation in the podosphere still today, as well as the future.

In addition, I do take issue from my own experience with several of Murphy’s lessons — in particular, numbers 4, 9 and 10. That is,

  • I have NEVER felt like an idiot when I participated as a podcaster in the podosphere;
  • I have tried to earn money, and I have been successful as a profitable podcaster; and
  • I have grown a large audience in the podosphere, with nearly 2 million downloads.

Thus, if you, as a new or aspiring podcaster, want to get some best practices, I would go to another source to see what some of them are, in spite of Mr. Murphy’s personal lessons learned. One such podcast show that gives a lot of best practices is The Audacity to Podcast from Daniel J Lewis; another is The School of Podcasting from Dave Jackson; and one last show is The New Media Show from Todd Cochrane.

As a matter of fact, this episode is giving me some impetus to prepare and publish an episode in this show for the future that will deliver to my audience MY OWN lessons learned after over 1500 podcast episodes from all my shows. Keep watching this space for any news of this upcoming episode later this year.

We do suggest that you read this article from Mr.  Muphy, but then we recommend that you put together YOUR OWN list of lessons which you yourself have learned in any number of key podcast episodes which can mean value and importance to you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

428- More info on best podcast equipment

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver yet info on another article that describes for the new and experienced podcaster  “Best equipment for Beginners and Pros.”

It seems that in the podosphere now, every month will have a self-proclaimed pundit publishing another article or delivering another audio episode or video that describes the “best” for podcasters.

So, although this never stops being renewed (and sometimes annoying), we bring you the summary of information that is given in this article in komando.com. And they specify that they are trying to show the reader some “beginner-friendly” options to purchase if you want to start going into podcasting. And note that you will be interspersed with pop-up ads and other calls-to-action to subscribe to their pages. But they continue:

  • The right computer for the right price;
  • The right microphone (and they present the AT2020 mic and the Snoball mic — which were popular and promoted back in 2007);
  • Audio interfaces for your microphone;
  • Audio-mixing and editing software options;
  • Windscreens (with no mention of pop-filters);
  • Headphones and amplifiers;
  • Microphone stands;

Now, for this podcaster who has been creating and publishing podcast content for the past 15 years, I would look at this list and immediately see that many key options are missing. This could be (for the neophyte) a bit confusing — especially if the new and aspiring podcaster has been consuming podcast episodes from shows of more experienced and knowledgeable podcasters (e.g., Dave Jackson in The School of Podcasting or Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast, etc.).

For if you go and peruse the site of Schoolofpodcasting.com (as an example), Dave Jackson actually gives you an updated version of different courses for the aspiring podcaster, such as:

  • Planning your podcast
  • Content is king
  • Podcasting Equipment
  • Skype 101 and recording remote interviews
  • Your Podcast Website
  • The mechanics of podcasting
  • Podcasting with Audacity
  • Adobe Audition Basics
  • Podcasting with Hindenburg journalist
  • Using the PowerPress plugin
  • Podcasting with Gargeband
  • Publishing your podcast (Libsyn, Blubrry and more)
  • Communicating With Your audience
  • Submitting your show to Apple and other directories
  • Growing your audience
  • Monetizing your podcast

Notice that podcasting equipment is just one of the courses offered. In addition, if you have any questions, you can get them addressed for FREE in a weekly live Saturday morning podcast called ASK THE PODCAST COACH. So free consulting for basic questions can be answered live by Dave and his co-host, Jim Collison of theaverageguy.tv.

So I, myself, as an experienced podcaster and podcast consultant would recommend Dave’s course and his podcast shows to help you get the most out of considering the “best” equipment and other issues in beginning your podcasts. And, of course, what is “best” for you is unique, because your show and your situation is unique — it all depends on your objectives, your audience targeted, your themes and your time and effort that you wish to put into podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson of schoolofpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

418- Podcaster Courtesy — discussion with Daniel J Lewis

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we have an edited episode from an earlier podcast that has been repurposed as evergreen content for this show, as the topic is still very relevant and important today in the podosphere.

The topic is PODCASTER COURTESY in terms of bumpers, interviews and other aspects of communication and sharing in the podosphere. And the interview was conducted earlier over the Skype network with podcaster, Daniel J Lewis, of The Audacity to Podcast.

As you will hear in this audio episode, we also focus on the aspect of the theme of “benevolent selfishness.” This has been a topic from some key internet marketers and podcasters (e.g., Paul Colligan with his podcast show of ThePodcastReport.com and his product offers, offerings and training courses, etc.). And we see how this can be a mutual benefit — although many podcasters (such as myself and Daniel J Lewis) actually give interviews and deliver bumpers without expecting anything in return.

We also discuss what a “bumper” is for a podcaster, and how this can be a tool that will help to advance your podcast, improve content, as well as grow relationships with other podcasters. And, of course, it goes without saying that a podcaster should reciprocate giving back to the former podcaster by supplying a corresponding bumper.

With several examples from our own experience, our perspectives of podcaster courtesy still remain sound today. We hope that this episode is of value to the new and aspiring podcasters, as well as all the other podcasters in the podosphere.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis of theaudacitytopodcast.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

413- Decision for applying to The Podcast Academy

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the issue of joining the new organization, The Podcast Academy. The membership application process opened up on 22June2020 online.

I myself have sent an application to join this group recently. And I did this because of a suggestion from Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast — for he said that this would be a good way to improve not only our own podcast shows, but also the podosphere. I also received info from Todd Cochrane of The New Media Show with his suggestion to join this group, even though his initial response contained some reservations.

So I did what I had to do, even though I was leery of a requirement to send two letters of reference from other podcasters or people of interest. This mandate, along with the fee ($50 USD for a short time, but then $100 USD after that per year) made me a bit skeptical, as I have seen multiple organizations within the past 15 years create their site, readily request applications to join and even ask for money — but then fail to deliver and finally go out of business thereafter.

I had been listening to a trusted podcast show with both Todd Cochrane and Rob Greenlee of The New Media Show podcast. And since I noticed that Rob Greenlee had been selected to be the leader of this organization, I guess that I would put my trust in him for his leadership and possible correct steering of this group to help the podosphere — including the Indie podcasters.

I would suggest that you may want to consume the episode dated 27May2020 from NewMediaShow.com to understand the nature of this group and get Rob’s comments. In this episode, some of the details that explain the organization and membership are discussed openly.

So, I hope that you consider this group for either joining or supporting — and see if they will do good for the podosphere. And if you do decide to join, I hope that your podcast can be more successful with the hints, tips, and all benefits of this organization.

Thank you for your consideration and attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Rob Greenlee and Todd Cochrane and Daniel J Lewis. All rights reserved.

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podcast

408A- Podcasters for hobby or profit or independence

In this very brief episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the differences between the podcaster for profit or hobby or independence. These are the differences in a couple of episodes from Daniel J Lewis in his The Audacity to Podcast show.

The first of the 4 differences of the types of podcasters were specified by Daniel J Lewis. Here, we go a step beyond the strict classification, as I, myself, have been all four of these types during my career in the podosphere (that is, a hobbyist, a professional, a corporate and an indie podcaster).

As you will hear in this brief audio episode, the details given by Daniel paint a pretty accurate representation of the type of podcaster you may be AT THE TIME you are identified as such (in my opinion).

So perhaps you should consider your journey into the podosphere and maybe update your resume to indicate the stages which you have experienced as a podcaster in one (or more) of these types. This can only be to your benefit, as you will be recognized as a subject matter expert, or a problem solver, or a solution provider, or even a thought leader in the podosphere.

Note: the last 4 were the stages of becoming a new media thought leader, as expressed in The Struggling Entepreneur older podcast show.

We hope that you can augment your skills and your reputation in the podosphere to become the very type of podcaster that will help make you successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis. All rights reserved.

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podcast

407- Considerations in starting a podcast network

In this episode of podcastreporter.com, we focus on the question of whether to join or even start your own Podcast Network. This theme came to me from a couple of recent episodes from Evo Terra in his Podcast Pontifications show, as well as Daniel J Lewis in his show, The Audacity to Podcast.

If your passion for podcasting has grown such that you want to join or even create your own podcast network, perhaps you should listen to the questions asked by Evo Terra, as well as listen to the experiences (the good, the bad and the ugly) from Daniel J Lewis (who did shut down his own podcast network that he started years ago).

My own experiences with podcast networks

Now, I have had experiences with the thought of joining a podcast network. In 2006 and 2007, I dipped my toes into the waters of joining what looked like a growing podcast network at Podango (this was the podcast company that had acquired Gigavox, the firm that created the Levelator in 2006). I wanted to be a part of what was called a “podcast station” (which was the category or genres of podcasts) called the Business Station. I wanted to include my flagship podcast at the time, Struggling Entrepreneur. And the sharing, the community and the financial benefits all seemed like a great beginning. However, I did have second thoughts about letting someone else run my show and own my RSS feed and content. So I decided NOT to join and just kept being on my own. And, by the way, I do not regret that decision, as Podango later went out of business in another year or two.

Then, in 2007, the podcast network bug bit me again. This time, I wanted to start a podcast network which I had temporarily called the “Content Creator and podcaster network.” This was going to be basically a membership site with 4 founders — one for the technical side of podcasting; another for the financial side of startups and podcasting; another for the marketing side of podcasting and its promotion; and my contribution, the personal productivity side of creating content and podcasts.

For this membership site, we even had a meeting which I had called. And I used the prior method of getting buy-in and commitment and dialog used by Tim Bourquin when he had founded the Podcast and Portable Media Expo in 2005. That is, I invited everyone to join me personally (at my expense for travel, lodging and meals) for a couple of days in Austin, Texas, so that we could discuss all day the creation of this membership site which would then create the network shortly after launch. In fact, we even had an attorney, who was himself a podcaster, join us via Skype to get the details of the contract which he would create for all of us to agree and sign as a commitment. Well, that meeting gave me an indication of how much CONTROL and OWNERSHIP and FINANCIAL EXPECTATION that podcasters desired. As a result, I saw that this arrangement would not suit all the parties involved — what seemed like an exciting discussion and proposal went down in flames when “the devil is in the details.” So we never gave the green light to create the contract (with legal fees of $1300 in those days), and we disbanded the idea. And the survivors were only two of us who started another podcast based on Finance for Startups (which has since podfaded).

What was obvious to me at that time, after some pre-investment expenses and time, was that podcasters were too much desirous of control and ownership of the direction. And this is only natural, since podcasting at that time was individually run, owned and managed by the solo podcaster. And these people were not used to SHARING any intellectual property or revenue with others, especially under contract.

So the notion of a podcast network or membership site was erased from my mind as a creator — and maybe one day I might join one already in session.

The 2 recent episodes about podcast networks

In a recent episode by Evo Terra in his show called Podcast Pontifications, the title of his script and audio episode was “Should you join or form a podcast network?”

In this audio episode, Evo asks the most important questions: What is it that you want to get out of the network, and what is it that you will be willing to sacrifice to belong in it? He not only goes over what his own backstory was in creating his own network back “in the day” of 2004 and following, but also how a loose confederation of podcasters can be just a social club rather than a really serious podcast network (and he describes what should be in a podcast network from his point of view).

So the benefits vs. the contributions is a matrix that you should put together to evaluate an existing podcast network that you may feel compelled to join. Also, if you wish to start one, you should examine deep in yourself what you really want to get out of managing this type of organization and see if you have the talent and skills to do so effectively, without having the passion of podcasting be lost due to frustrations because of your potential lack of skills.

And Evo relates what, in his opinion, is really needed for a good podcast network today.

Now, the other example with some lessons learned comes from Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show. He describes how he put together his network shortly after he joined podcasting in full force — and also the end of his network, along with the reasons why he ended it.

In his recent episode called “Why we retired our podcast network,” Daniel mentions that he had clear-cut goals when he created his podcast network: “My goal was to bring together like-minded podcasters with high-quality shows to grow together through synergy, community, support, crosspromotion, and sponsorship.”

However, what seemed to me to be more or less a society of like-minded individuals with different podcast shows from different genres and possibly some unrelated themes soon grew into a long list of participating shows in the network, like the following:

  • The Ramen Noodle
  • Are You Just Watching
  • The Audacity to Podcast
  • Beyond the To-Do List
  • The Productive Woman
  • Christian Meets World
  • The Sci-Phi Show
  • ONCE
  • Welcome to Level Seven
  • WONDERLAND
  • Under the Dome Radio
  • Resurrection Revealed
  • Podcasting Videos by The Audacity to Podcast
  • Inside the Podcasting Business
  • As you can see, this could appear to be a community of disjointed themes and topics, with possibly the intent to generate sponsorship, financial rewards from downloads and advertising, as well as cross-promotion. And Daniel then explains what things he did well in the network and what things that were done poorly:
  • Audience-relevant common theme
  • Cross-promotion
  • Cross-integration
  • Full and consistent community
  • and you can listen to his audio podcast episode to get the details. Then he states why he retired the network, including the ability for him to focus on fewer things, as well as giving each podcaster more room to expand.

So Daniel’s experiences deliver some lessons learned about starting a podcast network, and I would suggest that you take these into account if you get the passion to go beyond your own podcast shows and want to start your own network.

Considerations for the podcaster about Podcast Network

As a podcaster, what passion can be driving you toward wanting to start a great podcast network? Will you have the time? Will the additional workload and timetables and schedules and management of the network be something you will embrace, as well as have time for? Will you have the necessary skills to manage your network? Will you have the right temperment for being in the network? And will the podcasts in the network be the right ones, or will they be a hodge-podge collection of your favorite podcasters and additional genres and other topics that might not relate well to some audiences? Will the network be governed by contract or by word-of-mouth agreements?

So, whatever your decision may be concerning podcast networks may be (i.e., either joining one or starting one of your own), we hope that these two audio episodes can give you enough food for thought to know what to expect both from the contribution side and the giving side to the network.

So we hope that your podcast show will be successful, whether it be a part of a podcast network or not.

Thank you for your attention

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis and Evo Terra of Podcastpontifications.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

404- Podcasting with a co-host

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on podcasting with a co-host. We also refer to an article in themedium.com that was written by Joseph Anderson and deals with issues of co-host podcast recording.

Several points refer to respect for, and planning with, your co-host for best success — especially if both of your are employed or if distance keeps you quite distant from each other.

For this podcast reporter, I do record remotely several episodes of my podcast show called 2030podcast.com with my co-host, Matt Cox (who is a podcaster in his own right with his show, Brunch with the Brits). As a matter of fact, we propose this as a case in point to which you can examine in a casual and unrehearsed manner.

And finally, the topic of co-host issues was addressed very successfully by podcaster Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast in his back catalog of episodes. I heartily recommend that you may wish to review this content, for his detail is great in trying to cover all the angles that you may examine.

We hope that you can have a great working relationship with any potential co-host and have a successful podcast with great content and a great following.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and themedium.com and 2030podcast.com and Joseph Anderson. All rights reserved.

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podcast

401- Recent review of Podcaters Society

This episode of Podcast Reporter show gives a recent review of Podcasters Society membership site from Daniel J Lewis. He is an advanced podcaster with his show of The Audacity to Podcast.

First, I deliver a history of my experience when the membership site first launched several years ago. Then I mention that I subscribed once again this year as a member to see the changes and compare the new changes from the older experience.

Then I go through each of the major features, seminars, webinars, tutorials, courses, chats with others via Slack, tools and resources, etc. It is more of a walk-through.

My final result and recommendation: I would suggest that you consider joining this if you want to take your podcast show from “ordinary” to “amazing” levels. The cost is not prohibitive, and the value that is delivered to the member can be great.

So, if you are considering a membership site or mastermind group in podcasting, perhaps you may want to consider Podcasters Society. As I mentioned during this audio episode, I do consider this site to be more of a “collaborative mentorship.”

We hope that you find the appropriate membership site or group that will help you to succeed in the podosphere with your show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis and PodcastersSociety.com. All rights reserved.