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podcast

626- Using POC tactic for podcast consulting success

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter Show, we deliver to you a real-life example of a strategy and tactic that may bring success to you in your role as a podcast consultant — and that includes other business areas such as editing, billing, promotion, sales and a lead to other parts of your consulting business (e.g., video). This strategy and tactic is from my own experiences, and it is called the PROOF OF CONCEPT method and strategy.

This comes from the age-old tactic from a vendor who wanted to prove that he could successfully create a deliverable and successfully have it approved and satisfy a potential customer or prospect.

The age-old formula probably started initially as servitude. In other words, a craftsman or a skilled prospect would make a deal (or contract) with a master or principal. He would offer to work for a specific time period (e.g., a week or month) — or his offer would be to deliver a specific piece of work in a specific time span. If the principal (in this case, his potential customer) was completely satisfied, the agreement was that the prospect would then be upgraded to a formal laborer of the principal — or that the specific piece of work or deliverable that met the requirements would be the proof that the concept of his employment would be honored for continuing such deliverables to the customer (or master or principal — call the end receiver of the VALUE what you will) and be recognized as a true craftsman or valued employee for a period of time. And in some cases, the free time worked by the prospect would be recognized as time worked for pay, and he would receive the back wages, as well. In the case of deliverables, the agreed upon price for creating and finishing the said deliverables would also be paid, in addition to the terms of another agreement. For the deliverables, this would be a contract for creating and delivering some more final pieces — and  usually they would include back-pay for the proof of concept, as well (only this was flexible in the terms of the “contract” for the proof of concept.


So what was my experience in the world of podcasting with this tactic known as “proof of concept”?

Well, a prospect approached me after receiving my business card that mentioned my skills in podcasting. He wanted to know more about what I could offer him.

Instead of spouting a litany of sales-oriented offers, I wanted to know what he wanted and what he felt he needed in his business.

I saw that he wanted a full soup-to-nuts service of creating the podcast show and infrastructure, as well as the editing and production of episodes for professional polish. He called it “productizing” the episodes. Well, I declined on the large scale project and referred him to the consultant who had helped me to jump-start my podcast shows. The reference were the podcast shows I had done.

So he contacted the reference that I gave to him, but then he wanted to see what I could do with the several interviews which he had done and recorded — although some of them had very, very poor audio quality.

Now, he said that he wanted to start off with an interview show and he had recorded on his own these several audio interviews.

I told him to send me the audio files of a couple of interviews. I also looked at his web site, and I gave him a timetable for its completion and that he would receive the finished or “golden” mp3 files.

However, I gave him an amount that seemed reasonable and competitive for creating each final or golden mp3 audio interview, so that he could determine if his needs were met.

And I decided to exceed his expectations.

I took the mp3 files and listened to the poor quality of the interviews. I then cleaned up the audio, and then I added intro and outro music from quality musicians (for which I had obtained licenses to use in podcast episodes). I also added the voiceover intro with the intent of getting the listener interested enough to want to listen to the content of the interview. And I finally did the research of the interviewee and the program or situation being discussed. I also got a photo head shot of the interviewee from the public info center libraries. And then I created the SHOW NOTES, with the content and images included that would have the professional qualities that I would expect in that podcast episode.

And finally, I delivered both edited and “productized” episodes before the deadline.

The prospect was delighted, and I produced a written contract for him to sign. The contract, however, was not for the work done, but included the provision that I would receive a future minimum of episodes as content for future work to be “productized.”

Thus, the basic amount was for 10 additional episodes, as well as payment for the 2 episodes that I had delivered to him with his satisfaction and approval.

The deal was done by using the tactic of the proof of concept.

And so, the prospect then became my CUSTOMER and I would receive his interview files, which then I delivered to him in return as golden mp3 files, along with the added value of the show notes, the intro voiceover, the musical intros and outros, and any photo or images in the show notes content.

Well, he delivered to me over 25 episodes in the year. And they were ALL done with the same quality and delivered to him on time.

But then, after the 25th episode, he went silent and I did not hear from him for a month or so.

Why?

I never asked why, but only saw that after the brief absence, he contacted me in a email note and began to send me more interviews again. My suspicion was that another “podcast consultant” came to him with a lower price. However, the VALUE received of the services and deliverables probably did not meet his expectations. And so he returned to me for an additional 20 episodes. In fact, he asked me to create a video that promoted his offerings and his programs to his targeted audience. And I did deliver 2 videos — one as a proof of concept that was for no charge, and the other to meet his deadline. And when he wanted me to continue with the videos, I did decline, because I did not want to go into that business, as the return for my business was not really worth the time, effort, money, work and costly equipment and requirements. So I removed myself from the video world for him.


So that is the story of the tactic known as the proof-of-concept which was used in a real-life scenario in the podosphere by yours truly.

Perhaps this tactic may be one that you could use, or that you could take and improve on the method with your own style and delivery for potential customers.

But you have to be careful. You have to KNOW that your skills are very high, and that your pricing is competitive, and that your financial planning has proven that you can work within the structure of your proof-of-concept to make your tactic profitable for your business. And you can see what others are doing who use a variation of this tactic — and the name of Ben Krueger from cashflowpodcasting.com comes to mind. I have seen his offers and I have taken him up on purchasing a deliverable when he used the POC method. And I was pleasantly surprised with the quality, value and final deliverable from him within the time frame specified. And Ben would be a good example to see some of his offers using the poc tactic. In addition, Dave Jackson from The School of Podcasting also had offered several deliverables using a variation of this tactic.

So if you do decide to use the proof-of-concept for your podcast consulting business, we wish you the best in generating a great revenue stream for your business by having a successful podcast business.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

625- Checklists from pros about Launching and Recording podcasts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter Show, we discuss the value of the checklists for launching a podcast and preparing to record your podcast episode. The former is delivered in a post by Ben Krueger of Cashflowpodcasting.com. The latter is delivered by Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast in his podcast show and prior episode.

 

The first checklist is given to us recently by Ben Krueger in his post of cashflowpodcasting.com. It is titled “The Podcast Launch checklist: 21 steps to easily launch an industry leading podcast.”

Ben Krueger

Although this takes into account everything from the inception and idea of brainstorming to create the details for your podcast show up to the actual promotion and possible monetization of your podcast show, this is a good list to ensure that you can use very effectively the plans from others when you plot out the tasks needed to creating your podcast show.

In summary, the 21 steps from Ben (with a bit of description after each step, along with case studies after step 5) are:

☐ STEP #1: DECIDE WHAT PODCASTING WILL DO FOR YOU

☐ STEP #2: SELECT YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE

☐ STEP #3: CRAFT YOUR CENTRAL MESSAGE

☐ STEP #4: PICK YOUR PODCAST FORMAT & FREQUENCY

☐ STEP #5: DECIDE HOW YOUR PODCAST WILL MAKE MONEY (AND BECOME A PROFIT CENTER!)

☐ STEP #6: GET YOUR PODCAST RECORDING EQUIPMENT

“The next section lays out the exact steps to actually create your new podcast and get it launched to the world!

☐ STEP #7: CHOOSE A PODCAST TITLE

☐ STEP #8: CREATE YOUR PODCAST COVER ARTWORK

☐ STEP #9: CREATE BRANDED INTROS & OUTROS

☐ STEP #10: RECORD YOUR FIRST EPISODE(S)

☐ STEP #11: SET UP PODCAST HOSTING

☐ STEP #12: SET UP THE PODCAST ON YOUR SITE

☐ STEP #13: PRODUCE YOUR FIRST EPISODE(S)

☐ STEP #14: CREATE A WINNING “LAUNCH PLAN”

☐ STEP #15: SUBMIT YOUR PODCAST TO DIRECTORIES

☐ STEP #16: LAUNCH DAY!

☐ STEP #17: EMPLOY “GRASSROOTS MARKETING”

☐ STEP #18: PUBLISH REGULAR CONTENT

☐ STEP #19: GROW YOUR AUDIENCE & EMAIL LIST

☐ STEP #20: FURTHER MONETIZE YOUR PODCAST

☐ STEP #21: LEVERAGE YOUR NEW PODCAST AUTHORITY

 

And then Ben includes in this checklist summary  several case studies to add proof to his system. He delivers this content with the approach of his “What?” and “How” method. And for those who like this approach, Ben also adds his call-to-action for his site to provide solution-based value of podcast consultancy to any podcasters who wish to become a client of Ben for his services.


 

So, after you are ready and prepared to launch a podcast, you may be wishing for a simple — but mainly complete checklist for the preparation of recording your episode (especially if you are a newer or aspiring podcaster). This has been provided FREE to podcasters by Daniel J Lewis of the podcast show called The Audacity to Podcast.

This free resource is called “Podcasting preflight checklist” from episode 164 of his podcast show. And I strongly recommend that you download this and use it to ensure that you are fully prepared before you press the RECORD button on your system to capture the audio that you will deliver to your audience.

This checklist will go into the details of preparation for Ben’s checklist (above) step number 10.

This one-page single sheet resource can be downloaded as a pdf file and it should be used as a reference when you prepare to record your audio portion of your episode. I, myself, used this for several episodes until the routine became automatic — and I did not have to worry or back-track or forget anything important during the preparation phase before recording the audio.


So, for novice or aspiring podcasters, these checklists can be integrated into your planning and production systems and tasks to save you time and effort and energy (and frustration, in case you have to go back and include some forgotten tasks in your workflow). These professionals have already learned the secret to time-saving methods in a checklist format that can help you be productive and successful in planning and launching your podcast, as well as recording and producing effective episodes for your podcast growth and success.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

624 – Tips to avoid Podcast planning mistakes

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter show, we discuss some tips concerning some of the top podcast planning mistakes, as given to us in a post by Ben Krueger of Cashflowpodcasting.com.

Ben Krueger

In the podcast episode and post titled “The Top 3 Podcast Planning Mistakes,” Ben delivers a summary of what he considers are the top mistakes in planning your podcast shows:

  • Thinking that it is all about YOU;
  • “Build it and they will come”;
  • Not providing a clear call to action.

While certainly, these 3 are key mistakes when planning your show, I venture to say that there are others — and the gravity is a matter of opinion. In fact, Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting show has covered in many episodes of the past other key mistakes that he feels are catalysts when a podcaster determines that he has failed and that it is time to podfade a show.

I, myself, feel that other key mistakes were NOT to understand what your objectives are in starting your podcast, as well as not knowing who your audience is and what kind of VALUE is that you need to deliver to them.

And there are others that can be classified as either smaller mistakes of less offensiveness or those that focus on the business and the personal areas.


But, in looking and listening to the podcast episode by Ben Krueger, let us not forget that Ben also delivers his own personal call-to-action for the reader or listener to be aware of his free and fee resources — both his book and his roadmap. I have seen these and they do, indeed, provide good suggestions for the new or aspiring podcaster. And this is true in the area of PLANNING your show.


Also, Adam Curry (i.e., the podfather) also gives us one mistake that beginner podcasters make is that they do not create a podcast show that is really considered “an outsanding product.” Yes, the quality of the show is reflected by the followers or subscribers, the downloads and the responses to calls-to-action of the show itself. His case in point is his show called No Agenda, where he implemented the “value-for-value” model of contributions (either “time, talent or treasure”). I mention this because many think that their show may deserve the merit of being great — when in reality, no feedback or proof (other than social proof from only reviews) can back up that thought.

When I met with Adam the last time we had lunch together and with him during his meetups in Austin over the years, the idea that came through loud and clear was the proof that many hours of preparation and thought and planning went into each episode of his show. It was not the scenario of a couple of “dudes” sitting around a microphone and ad-libbing any sort of babble with expletives, just because they were having fun.

In my situation, I also started a podcast show several years ago whose main objective was just to have fun and really just play around with the audio infrastructure of podcasting with a co-host. This was the show called Grumpy Old Bears — but we really had no plan for success nor any means of feedback of proof. It was just a fun “hobby” for us, whereas the other podcasts I do have in operation now (such as this one) provide feedback to me on the content, the downloads, the acceptance and social proof, etc., to prove and demonstrate the VALUE they provide to their intended audiences.

So, again, I would advise the aspiring and new podcasters to give a quick listen to the 8-minute episode from Ben to learn about how one can disillusion one’s self when it comes to podcasting, and how this type of mindset can lead to creating and implementing some of what Ben Krueger considers the top 3 mistakes in podcasting. And hopefully, you can correct those and put yourself on the correct road to success in your podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

623- Step by step guide to editing and producing Podcasts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter show, we disclose information about a post by Ben Krueger that describes “a step by step guide to podcast editing and production.”

As you may know, Ben is the podcaster with his site called Cashflowpodcasting.com. He has delivered many resources (many of them free as pdfs) to those who are mainly new or aspiring podcasters. I have valued his deliveries of advice and resources since I met him personally in 2014 where I shared a booth with him in the expo hall during the very first Podcast Movement conference.

Ben Krueger

Ben first goes into the do-it-yourself approach to creating a podcast show and recording and editing its episodes. He refers to free software, such as audacity and others like auphonic to help podcasters in the editing of audio for podcasting. In fact, I, myself, have used various versions of the free software, Audacity, since my beginning in the podosphere. And with the help of good microphones, other devices and good software, I still continue using it today to record and edit my podcast episodes.

He then explores the idea of hiring a team to do your podcast editing, thus freeing you up to pursue content creation and marketing and sales and other talents. As we said in our last episode, you could hire a studio or an agency or get a podcast consultant to which you can “farm this out.”

But he ends this summary of the article with the suggestions for the do-it-yourself podcast editing — and he emphasizes why you should not be afraid of learning the tools and getting a good workflow down for editing the audio files yourself.


When I started my trip into the podosphere in 2005, there were no tools or training for being a podcaster and creating a workflow to do editing. It was not until I had read the book by Evo Terra and Tee Morris called Podcasting for Dummies that I learned the elements of a podcast and its creation. And it was not until 2006 that I was able to view and follow the audio and video training by Jason Van Orden to learn how to podcast. And in a little over one day, I had my first podcast episode created, edited and published on a public platform. And after that, I started discovering the podcasters who were podcast  consultants that offered to help you create and publish your podcast shows and episodes — and I chose Dave Jackson from The School of Podcasting as my podcast consultant. With his advice and his tutoring, I quickly learned a good workflow about podcasting, and I started creating more shows and publishing more episodes in the podosphere.

And I have never looked back after some 16 years.


Now, although today, you have a myriad of choices from agencies to consultants from which to choose,  you can select the best source and alternatives for you (in terms of quality, offerings, cost and results) to begin your career (be it part-time or full-time) into podcasting. And then you can also progress to the next step of setting up your podcasting as a tactic for your business — or you may even set up your own entrepreneurship as a podcasting business, as the tools and education and training for this are also available in many places and from many sources. As stated by Adam Schaeuble of the podcast show called the Podcasting Business School, you can treat your podcasting endeavor like a business, but enjoy it like a hobby.


And take it from someone like myself that has been a podcast consultant for over 10 years, there is a lot of room in the podosphere for those who want to use their creativity to improve the way podcast editing is done and the workflow for podcast production today.

One final note — Ben also has a call-to-action at the end of the post for you to download his free book, as well as know about his roadmap. I would suggest that you scan the article in the post by Ben to see if your world of podcasting can improve with the help of others — either as consultants, agencies or professionals — or with books or tutorials that can help you learn new materials, new ways, new tools and become more successful in publishing your podcast episodes.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and audacity and auphonic and Dave Jackson of schoolofpodcasting.com, and Tee Morris and Evo Terra. All rights reserved.

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podcast

622- Podcast Services may be a smart option

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the post made by podcaster Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com in which he describes his ideas for the BEST podcasting services.

Ben Krueger

The link to this post that describes the BEST PODCAST SERVICES for 2022 is in this content.

In this post, Ben starts with describing some of the criteria for services that gives them strong quality — such as saving time for the podcaster. Then he promotes his idea of the three OPTIONS for podcast services:

In a nutshell, there are three options out there to help you get your podcast up and running and keep your episodes on track:

  1. “Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Solutions. With budget-friendly do-it-yourself options, you’ll get SOME help from outside sources, but you’re essentially making your podcast happen on your own. These include things like software, courses, and coaches that allow you to handle the heavy lifting but offer guidance to make sure you’re on the right track.
  2. Done-For-You (DFY) Services. As the name implies, these services have developed done-for-you systems to handle podcast setup, audio editing, show notes writing, publishing services, etc. Of course, how many tasks they take on will vary with pricing and the organization.
  3. Podcast Managers. A podcast manager is in charge of planning, running, managing, and implementing your show. Essentially, this is someone (or multiple people) you hire as the point person for making your podcast happen and ensuring everything runs smoothly for your releases.”

Then Ben goes into the category of DYI SOLUTIONS, including the software, as well as training courses and coaching scenarios.

Then Ben goes into DFY SOLUTIONS, which could be “done for you” by a professional podcast consultant or other resource such as a podcast production service. And here, Ben examines the financial decision elements in selecting the best solution for you — including the cost-effective, mid-range and high-end options to suit your budget.

All of these take into account the relationship with the PODCAST AGENCY. And after that, he spends more time in describing the PODCAST MANAGER. And here, he spends a bit of time recommending the important elements of both contractors and team members — and he gives you this tip:  Pro Tip: Whatever solution you decide is right for you, we strongly recommend that you make sure there’s a quality review process of some kind to review your completed show and episodes before they publish. “

And finally, in reviewing other value-added services, he adds some comments on BOOKING SERVICES (to have you as a GUEST on another podcast or securing GUEST INTERVIEWEES for your podcast). He mentions Interview Valet as a service with Tom Schwab (whom we have interviewed on this podcast since 2015) with these final suggestions:  “This can go two different ways. Either you want to get booked as an expert on a series of other podcasts, or you want a systematic way of having interview guests booked for your own show. “


And, of course, Ben finishes his post by promoting his own services for podcasting (see cashflowpodcasting.com) and how he can help podcasters improve their show for success.

Note: I have known Ben since 2014, when we shared a booth at the first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas. I have followed him and do recommend him for his detailed resources — and you may want to investigate him and his offerings to help you and your podcast show. Also, I, myself have been a podcast consultant during the last 16 years and have offered, promoted and delivered podcast services for others who did not want to learn the details of podcasting, but preferred to subcontract this out to others — and I always had my proof-of-concept that always succeeded in gaining the trust and commitment of clients. What I usually did was offer to get an interview they conducted (if they wanted to have an interview show, for example) and then do the editing and audio improvement on the file, as well as adding the title, the music and the INTRO and OUTRO for a suggested final mp3. And then I would send it back to the client under a contract that specified the minimum number of episodes and each one at a single price for the final deliverables.


So, at this time, I would strongly suggest that you review your options for improving your podcast shows by examining whether or not you should consider the use of podcast services. In many areas, you may find that your time is your most valuable resource that can be put to use more effectively than spending time and effort in completing the tasks for workflow in creating the podcast final audio episode.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

621- Tips on conducting a Podcast interview

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter show, we discuss a post from podcaster Ben Krueger on conducting a podcast interview. This content came from a July, 2022, post from his blog and site called cashflowpodcasting.com.

Now, I have known Ben since 2014, when he and I shared a booth at the very first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas, Texas. Since then, I have listened to his episodes and advice, as well as having ordered some of his offerings and downloaded and reviewed some of his helpful FREE PDFs for podcasters.

Ben Krueger

In his July, 2022, post, Ben titles the content with “How to conduct a great interview.” He then elaborates on the requirements for a good podcast interview, but also gives his value in how to conduct the interview to deliver the best VALUE to your listeners. He tries to boil it down to the simple status in his statement:  “Fundamentally, there are two things that really matter when you’re interviewing people:

1. You are having a natural, connecting conversation with another human being.

2. You are responsible for finding the answers to the questions that your audience has.”

In fact, the main topics of his post are the following:

  • Focus on stories and emotions;
  • Suggestions and examples on “How to interview someone for a podcast;”
  • He refers to details in a post about O. Winfrey titled “How to Interview Someone For A Podcast.” And that is, as he states, “because she goes into the emotion and the stories.”

Ben, of course, offers both his FREE BOOK and his membership site of cashflowpodcasting.com where you can get his roadmap. He is always good about reminding his viewers, listeners and readers about his services and offers and offerings to help them improve — and many of them free.

Thus, if you are interested in reviewing your strategies and procedures and workflow in the area of interviewing others for podcast episodes, then I would highly encourage you to see what Ben has to offer in the way of friendly advice — especially when he has been labeled as a good resource for podcast interviews. Since Ben is specialized in the area of business podcasting, this may be a feather in your cap to help you succeed more in the area of interviewing key guests to help your podcast shows grow and become more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting. All rights reserved.

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podcast

599- Tips on how to structure a Podcast

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter Show, we review the topic of structuring your podcast and episodes. This theme was discussed in December of 2021 by Ben Krueger, a podcaster and consultant with his show, Cashflowpodcasting.com in his email content with the title “How to structure a podcast.”

Now, as you may know, the REAL objective of a podcast show and its episodes is to provide value to your listeners and audience. As Ben Krueger states in this post, “you should aim to cram as much value in the shortest possible time.”

Ben Krueger

In addition to ending the podcast episode at a shorter time (which may be the right time), one key areas of discussion by Ben deals with the preparation required for quality content (in addition to good audio). As Ben states:  “If you’re eager to record a new podcast episode, it can be tempting to just get behind the microphone and start. This is one of the easiest ways to hamper an episode’s potential. Structuring your podcast episodes can increase the value of your content and help listeners to find what they’re looking for. Before you begin recording, a little bit of preparation can make all the difference.”


Now, after this mention, Ben goes into detail into the following areas of tips for structuring your podcast:

  • “Why is it important to structure a podcast?
  • How do you write a script for a podcast?
  • What are the key components of a podcast?
  • How do you create an outline for a podcast?
  • How do you structure a podcast interview?”

As is stated, scripting your podcast and creating key components by writing an outline can be great ingredients for preparing VALUE for your listeners and customers.

We hope that you, as a podcaster, can improve the quality and value of your show by structuring your podcast better — and we hope that you can get some value from this post from Ben Krueger.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger. All rights reserved.

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podcast

594- Ben Krueger on Podcast Procrastination

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we consider an article by Ben Krueger (podcaster and creator of cashflowpodcasting.com) in which he ponders the reasons why potential podcasters delay in getting started — in fact, he titles it “The One thing stopping you from starting your podcast.”

Now, you could consider this a type of procrastination from getting your feet wet in the podosphere as an aspiring podcaster.

And as we delve more deeply into this article, there is food for thought that someone who would like to podcast should really know what he may be missing out on by not starting. And we would ask ourselves the same question — what is the one big reason why anyone who wants to podcast would hesitate?

In the article, Ben describes the dilemma and the lost potential of communicating with a good audience and telling your own story and delivering your own message:

The biggest thing that gets in the way of podcasting dreams is the desire to do it right. And it’s not surprising if you think about it. Industry advocates and leaders have become successful because when they decide to do something, they make sure they do it well.

They make the effort to create high-quality work, use a strategy that gets results, and make the most of their time so they can focus on what they’re best at. This drive to do it right is key to their success in other things, and podcasting is no different.

The problem is that because they are so focused on this, their podcast becomes the project they think about for months—if not years—before they’re ready to commit. In my experience, this is usually due to three main issues that must be addressed before these would-be podcasters feel ready.”

And so Ben describes these main issues for aspiring podcasters and their procrastination:

  • Issue number 1:  the excuse or reason is “I don’t have the time.”
  • Issue number 2:  Being intimidated by the tech in podcasting;
  • Issue number 3:  The desire for success (and the resulting fear of failure to meet expectations).

Now, in my past, I have taught Personal Productivity (aka “time management”) courses to professionals. There is always some proven method to be able to be more productive (about 25 per cent for many people) with their time. In fact, when I taught the course, the objective was “to accomplish more in less time with better quality and to reduce stress.”

As Ben addresses in the article, getting help with software, or with virtual assistants, can free up time for you to be able to engage in the podosphere and get some good results. Obviously, his call to action is to hire a professional who can assist in helping you get started (like himself). And I have no problem with this, as I myself did hire Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting to help me get my podcasts launched (even after I had taken self-study courses in starting a podcast show and creating and publishing an episode).

And, of course, if you have the money and want to get a pro to do it all for you, the hiring of help is the ideal way — even though most of the aspiring podcasters cannot afford it:  “The third and best option is to hire a full-service podcast production agency that takes care of the strategy, as well as all the time-consuming and technical stuff so that all you have to do is show up and hit record.”

I highly recommend that you, as an aspiring podcaster, should review the contents of this article so that you can really get past the excuses of “no time” or “no tech savvy” to get yourself into the podosphere — especially since most of us cannot go with the third alternative, which is to hire a full-blown studio to do it all for you. And although this is one alternative that can be provided by Ben Krueger, your budgets may have a warning for you from proceeding down the full-blown studio setup.

Yes, it may take some time and some self education, as well as a minor investment in training materials, as well as the tech devices and software. But once you get past the learning curve, you will find out how satisfying it can be to prepare, produce, publish and promote your own show and episodes.

As Ben summarizes, the HELP you need is something which you must explore, investigate, analyze and plan for stepping into the podosphere: “The moral of the story? Get help at whatever level is appropriate so that your time and effort are maximized for success…Instead of trying to figure out all the tech on your own, there’s a much simpler and more effective way: Ask for recommendations, and keep it simple…Starting a podcast can be time-efficient, simple and rewarding — if you let it.”

In fact, Ben recommends one of his resources to start with, as it is a free key piece of advice:  “(A great place to start is to download our free book, which breaks down our proven 5-step process for starting and managing a podcast…)”

In his book, Die Empty, Todd Henry (a podcaster and author) also mentions that a graveyard is the biggest container of lost ideas and valuable projects that never got started. Thus, Ben, in a similar manner, suggests that you NOT let procrastination of getting into the podosphere be one of your tragedies that were never realized in life.

Thus, we hope that you will find the time and get the training and education and put together a realistic plan to engage in the podosphere and have a successful podcast.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Kreuger and Todd Henry. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

593- Starting a Podcast or not — some questions

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of starting a podcast — especially in 2022. This theme came to me from a post by  Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. Then the opposite viewpoint was proposed in a later post from another podcaster titled “Why you shouldn’t start a podcast.”

So, in this episode, we briefly discuss the main topics of both related themes to starting a podcast.


STARTING A PODCAST IN 2022 vs NOT DOING SO

Suggestions for starting a podcast in 2022

First, from Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com, we get the encouragement and details of starting a podcast show and episodes in his earlier post. Now, as I have mentioned before in earlier episodes on this show, I have great respect for Ben for the deliverables he creates and the recommendations that he gives to the new and aspiring podcasters.

Ben Krueger

And in this post, he gives to us his philosophy that determines the timing of podcast show creation:  “Timing is critical to succeeding in anything. Podcasting is no different. The timing of launching your podcast can make a BIG difference in its initial success. ** So the question is, what’s the BEST time to launch a podcast? **”

And he gives the short answer to the aspiring business podcaster who is filled with emotion, passion and energy for starting a podcast: “It comes down to where you’re at in the development of your business.”

What Ben delivers are some key bullets that outline the timing of podcast show creation:

  1. “You have an established service/offer that sells, and gets clients results

  2. You already have some audience to start with (client list, email list, social following, personal network in the industry, etc)

  3. You’re ready to start scaling.”

And then Ben gives an example of a client and stories of those who have gone through the process and have become successful. And, of course, Ben delivers his own call-to-action for his own program to help podcasters get started: “Learn more about how we help leaders launch podcasts and request a free consultation call here:
https://cashflowpodcasting.com/services/podcast-launch-program/ “

He continues to describe the program: “The Podcast Launch Program includes everything you need to develop your podcast idea, plan and outline it, design and record your first episodes, produce them and launch your show to the world.”

And Ben then goes on to describe the major components, tasks and milestones that an aspiring podcaster can go through:

  • Strategic planning;
  • Podcast coaching;
  • Branding creation;
  • Setup and submission;
  • Launch and promotion;
  • Production and marketing.

I would strongly encourage aspiring podcasters to review these types of programs, especially from Ben, to see if they can help you to achieve success in your business podcast while you may be in the planning stages. I think you will be pleased from what you can learn and what the results of your show will deliver.


DON’T START A PODCAST — IF THE SHOE DOESN’T FIT

The other side of the coin is the recommendation NOT to start a podcast, with the following topics that you also need to review before jumping into the podosphere with both feet:
  • Am I doing this for my ego or an audience?
  • How to set yourself up for podcasting success;
  • Do I really know what I am getting myself into?
  • Steps to release a podcast episode;
  • Am I doing this because I think this is a way to make money?
  • Am I doing this because I think I should?
  • Coming up with a great podcast idea.
  • When do you know if podcasting is right for you?

And each of these sections provide a few sentences on the thoughts espoused in each topic, especially in awareness of the “loneliness of the long-distance podcaster”:

“If the answer to “Why do you want to start a podcast?” is anything other than ‘Because I’ve got amazing content that will educate/inspire/entertain and I desperately want to get it into people’s ears” then think twice. Podcasting is a big commitment with absolutely no guarantee of success. The people who have been successful are those who consistently create valuable and engaging content that appeals directly to their ideal listener. If you’re passionate about every episode you’ll be happy to keep going even when no one is listening.”


As usual, I would recommend doing a cost-benefit analysis of the pros and the cons of launching your own podcast. And now you should include not only the labor and EFFORT and TIME that podcasting requires (and you can get that from other successful podcasters who can tell you the truth about the 3-to-1 or 4-to-1 ratio of time required per minute of finished audio) — but also of the FINANCIAL requirements that can only increase. Remember that many podcasters make a quick estimate of costs, which later turn out to be less than required, and the budgets may grow quickly and become sore points for the podcaster.

Whatever your decision — to start a podcast in 2022 or to avoid podcasting altogether — I hope that you will make the best decision for yourself, your business and your future success.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger and Rachel Corbett. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

590- Ideas for setting up your Podcast studio

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss an earlier post by Ben Krueger, a podcaster at cashflowpodcasting.com,  in which he posts the text by Adam Crookes in which the latter addresses the age-old topic of podcast studios. He gives some recommendations on how to set up a podcast studio as potential ideas.

Now, as I have stated many times before in this show, I do respect and admire the value that is delivered by Ben Krueger, as I have known him and interviewed him since the time I personally shared a booth with him the exhibit hall of the very first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas in 2014. So I thought that this would be a great topic to explore once more and get his perspective. However, I got some words from a guest post from Adam Crookes. And my perspective of the post follows after a brief summary of the article.


Summary of the Post

Now, for those interested in creating your own studio, the article gives you thoughts about what is required as food for thought:

  • Estimating the costs of setting up a studio;
  • What is required for the studio?
  • How do you set up a studio in your home? And the post then gives you a list of items and tasks required for your in-home studio:
    • Here’s a list of equipment you should consider for your podcast studio:
      • “Computer
      • USB or XLR microphone
      • Audio interface
      • Mixer
      • Windscreen or pop filter
      • Microphone stand
      • Headphones
      • Acoustic treatments”
  • Then the post delves into the question about whether or not you can start your podcast shows with just your phone;
  • And finally, what is addressed is the age-old question about whether a podcast show is worth it to both you and your audience;
  • Then the article suddenly jumps into the subject of the necessity of headphones when starting a podcast;
  • And then a key question ends the post by asking if it is free to start a podcast on Spotify.

For these questions, I feel that this article, written by Adam Crookes, leaves out a lot of other key questions and statements that a new or aspiring podcaster needs to investigate before setting up a studio. One of these would be testimonials from those who have successfully set one up and are currently podcasting and reaching their success in their objectives at the time. Another would be the time it takes for a podcast studio to be written off or get a good ROI for your business, should you be creating a business podcast.


All in all, I find that this post does little in awakening a coherent target of your mind to investigate fully what is involved in setting up your podcast studio (other than the equipment and physical preparation of your home studio). I know that Ben Krueger would have addressed this topic with more research, more details, and with some personal and third-person experiences of successful podcasters who have set up their own studios and are showing great results from it — or experiences that did not see the studio succeed in the business.

One item you may want to explore is the Podcasting Business School site, where the main theme is to treat your podcast like a habit, but to grow it like a business. Within the 200 episodes so far, the podcaster did cite a few minutes on building a home studio for podcasting.


For myself, I have been a podcaster who has done remote reporting with adequate tools for the past 16 years, as well as have had a “podcast studio” (or a place where I record my podcasts with guests or by going solo) in several sites, from California to Texas in inbetween (including hotel rooms when I have been traveling and in transit). I will address the key areas that I propose for a studio in a later episode, as I will share with you my experiences for doing so.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger and Adam Crookes . All rights reserved.