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podcast

425- Importance of podcast Scripts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on an article found in the July issue of medium.com that dealt with scripts in podcasting. The title of the article is “Scripting Down Your Podcast : How Important is it?”

In this article, the topic of the importance of podcast scripts is reviewed from the point of view of the value to the podcaster.

In the beginning of the article, the key factor articulated is that “Having a script will help you deliver your message in a more effective manner.”

Then the article delivers some tips to frame a great podcast script. In addition to creating a road map of your episode topics, the article also suggests that you maintain a conversational tone (and not an overly technical one), as well as leaving some room (or markers) for impromptu topics that will suggest spontaneity in your content. And although I, myself, do not recommend the following tip, the article suggests that you even indicate certain patterns of speech: “mark out the specific lines for pauses, laughs, emphasis, and sighs.”  (You see, for myself, these audio noises should be natural and sometimes spontaneous)

And finally, the article even includes some tips for quality scripting with a suggested podcast script template. This framework would give you the following areas of content for a “quality script”:

  • 1. Sponsor message
    2. Introduction
    3. Musical jingle/sound effects
  • 4. A longer explanation of what’s in store
    5. Topic 1
    – Main point
    – Supporting point
    – Supporting data
    – Supporting quote
    6. Segue
    7. Topic 2
    – Main point- Supporting point
    – Supporting data
    – Supporting quote
    8. Sponsor message
    9. Topic 3
    – Main point
    – Supporting point
    – Supporting data
    – Supporting quote
    10. Segue
    11. Outro
    12. Call to action
    13. Sponsor message
    14. Musical jingle/sound effect

And, as you can see, the detailed script becomes quite a template for production of a full episode.

Now, for this podcast reporter, I have done scripting like the above in the early days of my podcasting experience — back from 2006. However, with practice and experience, I have been able to break away from the chains of such a strict template to a brief outline or a detailed outline (depending upon the nature of the topic, the interviewee involved, and the amount of minutia or details concerned).

For the novice or new podcaster, or for the aspiring podcaster, the above template can give an idea to the podcaster of how much detailed work there is to plan for a quality podcast episode instead of just “winging it” or doing a “roll your own on the fly” episode.

However, perhaps your episode need not be so rigorous or strict or detailed. A good, solid outline can be a perfect substitute once your audio conversational skills are perfected, and when you can learn to be spontaneous with a guest, or when you can have enough background in your topic to go “off script” (as they say in the media).

Whichever method you choose, a script can be a good training tool. It can also be the foundation for creating good show notes and ensure that you have good skills in planning your podcast episodes. And perhaps you may want to create your own template — suited to your skills, your personality, your podcast show and your topics.

So we hope that your scripting skills can be improved and that your planning for your episodes will help make your podcast show successful in growing your audience and making loyal fans of your listeners.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and mediu.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

424- What to do after you launch a podcast show

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we reflect on the issue of what a podcaster might do (with a few suggestions) after this individual has launched a podcast show. We include some recommendations from an email and blog from Ben Krueger of CashFlowPodcasting.com.

Ben Krueger

As we have referenced Ben before in this podcast show, he offers usually some materials that can be of assistance and help in not only explaining the concept, but also giving you some steps that are actionable. And this information is included in a pdf document that he provides for free at cashflowpodcasting.com. And the title of this free 10-page pdf document is “WHAT TO DO NOW THAT YOUR PODCAST IS LAUNCHED!” And it is dated  July 14, 2020.

A very high level summary of Ben’s recommendations are the following:

  • Establish your process;
  • Integrate your podcast;
  • Check your mindset; and
  • Move forward.

Ben also suggests that you obtain a book which he wrote called “Podcast Principles” — and with the subtitle, he claims that this is  “the book that helps you start the perfect business podcast.”

We also have a few of our own suggestions from our experience to help the new podcaster become more successful in a shorter time frame and have the podcast show gain audience growth or create community, as well as increase listeners.

In my opinion, you should also include the following to your list of to-do’s after you launch:

  • Determine what type of mentoring you may need or want;
  • Determine if a mastermind group or a membership site for podcasting is suitable for you;
  • And, of course, my pick would be for you to review and possibly join a group from Daniel J Lewis (of the Audacity to Podcast) called the Podcasters Society membership site — so that you can take your podcast show from average to amazing.

So with these suggestions and resources that you have available from Ben Krueger to help you along, we hope that you can find these of value. And we sincerely hope that you can help your podcast show, now launched, into growing your audience and becoming successful to meet and exceed your objectives as a great business podcast show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

423- Being interviewed on podcasts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we repurpose evergreen content with Max Flight, a podcaster, who describes for us the issues with being interviewed for a podcast — i.e., not being the interviewer, but the interviewee.

As you will hear in this audio episode, the content from Max Flight is from the point of view of the individual being interviewed. And although the time frame was a bit earlier in the podosphere, the issues and the suggestions are still valid today — although there are a few more tools to assist the novice podcaster being interviewed.

And so we deliver the podcast content from episode #20 of this series, you will notice that Max had a very good ear for quality content, and he brings his suggestions and experiences from being interviewed on the previous (and now podfaded) show of The Struggling Entrepreneur.

Editor’s note: some of the content has been updated to reflect today’s environment.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

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podcast

422- Podcasting Pundit Paul Colligan at Podcast Movement 2020

In this issue of PodcastReporter.com, we repurpose a prior episode of this show (#328), where we interviewed Paul Colligan on the exhibit hall show floor of the Podcast Movement 2020 conference (known as Evolutions).

Now, Paul Colligan has been a podcaster since 2004, and he has been a strategist for profitable podcasting. He also developed and sold his own product in 2007-2008 that provided support for a one-to-one RSS feed delivery and key deliverables for good revenue streams and podcasts (which was known as PremiumCast).

In addition to being a luminary, a content creator with videos, blogs and other media deliverables, Paul is also a screencaster, a solution provider, a trusted advisor  and thought leader for the podcasting and New Media space. He is highly regarded by all of the early podcasters and has been not only a role model, but also a mentor to many (such as myself). As a matter of fact, my I was a member of his “member” program called New Media Inner Circle and also took his course called Podcast Secrets in 2007.

Now, we had interviewed Paul before a major event that was the key for podcasters in 2015 (i.e., the NMX or New Media Expo in Las Vegas). In that episode, Paul gave us not only the state of the podosphere at that time, but also where he felt that podcasting would be going in the next five years — that is, 2020). And here is the link to the audio file:

Paul plans to launch yet another podcast, and he will call it The Aging Tech Show. This is planned to be a model for podcasting that will be current with a lot of fun for strategies for profitable podcasting — among other things.

In addition, Paul also will update his book series on podcasting (originally started with the title of “How to Podcast” — since 2015 and 2016).

So, we encourage all podcasters to subscribe to his podcast show called The Podcast Report. It is delivered by Paul for each season, and it contains gems that do prove to be of value to all podcasters.

We hope that all you podcasters enjoy Paul’s books, his videos, his new show, as well as The Podcast Report — and that the content from his programs will help to make you successful in your podcasting.

Thank you for our attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

421- ID3 tags and their value

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we focus on an article in podnews.net called “Do ID3 Tags matter for Podcast SEO?”

Here, the issue is the VALUE of SEO (i.e., search engine optimization) for podcasters today, as opposed to the early days of the podosphere in 2004 when a lot of importance and emphasis we placed on ID3 tags in your podcast episodes.

As you will see in this article by James Cridland, the key question is whether or not today’s podcasters are using ID3 tags and whether or not it provides any value for your episodes or your podcast shows.


For this podcast reporter, the ID3 tags are still being included in each podcast episode. For myself, the value for the podcast show delivers some data for those players that allow the listener or those who download or consume to get more information about the show and the episode.

In summary, my perspective is this — an old podcaster mentor of mine (i.e., Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting) delivers for me the criteria for this decision:  “As Dave Jackson says, it’s worth still putting them into your files: because the 0.1% of people who still use their Rio mediaplayer might like to see it. Who knows, they might be useful in the future; and they should be done relatively automatically by your digital audio editor or podcast host.”

Now, in addition, if you listen to episode dated 11July2020 in Dave Jackon’s Ask The Podcast Coach show, you will hear some of the reasons why Dave still fills out and includes ID3 tags with each episode. Some of them are to prevent some regret if one of the big publishers decide to use them again in the near future (although today many of them have neglected ID3 tag file content).

For yourself, as a podcaster, you have to see if the ID3 tags are worth including or should they be ignored.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

420- Podcasting Secret Sauce

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we focus on an article written recently by Steve Pratt at Pacific Content called “Podcasting’s Secret Sauce…REVEALED!”

Now, although this may sound like a lot of hype, this evergreen content may be useful and be of value to the new and aspiring podcasters who need to understand WHAT TO DO toward making their podcast show more successful — and more important, what NOT to do (or keep on doing) so that the show does not stagnate.

So, for the past 15 years of my experience as a podcaster or involved in the podosphere, I have seen many a book or publication or blog or have listened to many a podcast episode about what to do to “guarantee success” in podcasting. And this goes all the way from the 2013 episodes of John Lee Dumas when he emphasized the secrets of getting on the iTunes “New and NoteWorthy” listing and visuals to the courses that can just about convince you to quit your day-job and go into a full-time successful career in podcasting.

However, many of the so-called self-appointed pundits did not really call their strategies a “secret sauce.” As a matter of fact, the course that I took myself as a teleseminar and audio sessions was that by Paul Colligan called Podcast Secrets in 2007-2010. And this was really a business course that taught you how to design a business for creating a profitable podcast. And it did work for those interested into putting in the time, the trouble and the continuing effort to update, to nurture and to pursue the work of maintaining and growing the podcast show.

As you will read in the blog post from Mr. Pratt, many podcasters started in 2005 with the idea from The Field of Dreams movie that “if they build it, they will come.” Well, podcasting is one environment where they will NOT come if you build it — not with over a million shows giving stiff competition and with problems in discovery for your show.

You have to create strategies to plan, to record, to publish, to promote, to monitor and to nurture your podcast show and all its episodes — and also to be able to update your show from feedback resulting from the results of your show to improve over time and grow your audience. And also, you can do the same for any revenue streams that are created from your podcast.

And this article from Mr. Pratt allows the reader to consume the areas needed for the management of the podcast — from creation to nurturing, and then to go on to the follow-on strategies in case you have to pivot, due to the business conditions or other unforseen circumstances (e.g., the virus crisis of 2020).

He considers the “easy” tasks for the new podcasters to be the following (very much like the old television ads of the 1960s called “the lazy man’s way”): “In podcasting, here are some of the things that are easy:

  • Record an extended interview or conversation and don’t edit it
  • Publish your podcast on a wide variety of platforms
  • Promote your podcast by writing a single, easy cheque to a single publisher

If you only do the easy things, you’re much more likely to end up in the Field of Nightmares. You will build it and no one will come.”


But then you can see the different points that Mr. Pratt gives for seriously considering the effort in making your podcast successful — i.e., what he calls his “secret sauce.”

Among these are nine different elements that contribute to success. For, as he will tell you, If you do this type of hard work, you will build something great and tell all the right people about it. They will come and they will listen. There is no EASY button.”

Now, what is my perspective after having been a podcaster for nearly 15 years? I would strongly suggest that you reflect upon each of these elements and see if you have thought through and created plans and strategies that can help you to monitor the success of each one, just to ensure that your podcast is going in the right direction — whether it be a profit-making podcast or a hobby podcast or even a corporate podcast.

Although they seem to be overly simple and easy, please note that the most simple plans are usually the most difficult ones to create, implement and monitor to a successful conclusion. As I emphasize again from the article, you may have a lot of buttons for your business, but in the world of successful podcast shows, “there is no EASY button.”

I wish you the best in generating your strategies and putting in the hard work to create and implement your podcast and find your own “secret sauce” to success.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Steve Pratt at blog.pacific-content.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

419- Review of SHIFT virtual meeting — Podcast University

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we report on my perspectives of the virtual conference or meeting named SHIFT delivered on 14July2020 by the podcastmovement.com  team at their inaugural celebration for Podcast University.

Now, I myself had joined the program (it was a free signup for any podcaster in early July, 2020). And so I was interested in the element of COMMUNITY and good CONTENT for podcast episodes and generating podcast ideas — perhaps these ideas could spawn good themes and topics for content in my podcast episodes of my podcast show, PodcastReporter.com.

When I got online and entered the virtual meeting, I was surprised to see that not one of the experienced podcasters with the authority and the credentials and with over 14 years of podcasting and being a thought leader was on the agenda. In fact, I had only known of one of the podcasters that presented a summary of an Edison report for the audience — but it was only limited to 30 minutes.

In fact, it was quite obvious that the podcast crew who ran this free session had a specific agenda for their point of view. And in my opinion, I saw nothing that I really got out of the several hours of the day that addressed my objectives having joined the “university” — which were community and content.

In fact, it is only my opinion that you will NOT hear from podcasters who have the credentials, experience, skills, objectivity and content from this group — and I am talking about people like Adam Curry, Dave Jackson, Douglas Welch, Todd Cochrane, Ray Ortega, Rob Greenlee, Gordon Firemark, etc. Because, in my opinion, these podcasters just mentioned give an objective viewpoint and deliver VALUE (and not just causes) to the listeners, as well as great hints and tips to their audiences on many platforms.

If you are curious to see what the agenda was for this session, the text from the session with the schedule has been made into a pdf for your perusal, and it is here:

https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/fgcastgain/Shift_schedule_for_14July2020.pdf

In fact, the only session that, in my opinion, was worth consuming, was the Edison report about the Latino listening report. I felt that the background for the study done about this, as well as the charts used and presented, and the conclusions reached all seemed to address the podcast questions about an audience for podcasters that can be nurtured and addressed by today’s podcasters — and even in English, and not just in Spanish. And this was the description of this specific session (with the hours being in Eastern Time zone): “1:51 PM – Latino Podcast Listener Report Gabriel Soto of Edison Research & Martina Castro of Adonde Media will present the Latino Podcast Listener Report, and discuss how podcasters can use this data to grow their podcast and expand their reach.”

Thus, if you are into “rainbows and unicorns,” then pershaps the spirit and delivery of this session is appropriate. But for the experienced podcasters who wish to receive more skills, content and help to grow the community of their audience — then this type of session and virtual venue may not satisfy the bill completely for them.

It will be interesting to see how the speakers and the theme of Podcast Movement 2020 in Dallas will be aligned with this type of SHIFT movement — and whether ALL podcasters can benefit from either the in-person or virtual conference, and not just those who are subjectively endeared by the latest SJW or popular causes.

And if you ask what is the take-away for me from these 5 hours of presentations, then I would say that I want to start consuming more Latino podcasts — both in Spanish and English. Now, I had done so way back in the days of 2006 when there were a handful of Spanish-speaking podcasts (mainly from Iberian Spain, like Pato Pascual, El Podcast de No tengo iPhone, Podcastellanos, etc.). And even though I had published several episodes in Mexican Spanish (which is my native language, since I, myself, am Hispanic), I had concentrated for the last 12 years of podcasting in English. So that one session showed me an opportunity that I am missing by not addressing the Latino-Mexico audience today. And I can then make plans to create, plan, and possibly launch a podcast in the near future in Spanish.

So, we hope that your take-aways from this agenda-oriented format can be positive for you, as well, and that you can then help to grow your podcast show and be more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and PodcastMovement.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

418- Podcaster Courtesy — discussion with Daniel J Lewis

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we have an edited episode from an earlier podcast that has been repurposed as evergreen content for this show, as the topic is still very relevant and important today in the podosphere.

The topic is PODCASTER COURTESY in terms of bumpers, interviews and other aspects of communication and sharing in the podosphere. And the interview was conducted earlier over the Skype network with podcaster, Daniel J Lewis, of The Audacity to Podcast.

As you will hear in this audio episode, we also focus on the aspect of the theme of “benevolent selfishness.” This has been a topic from some key internet marketers and podcasters (e.g., Paul Colligan with his podcast show of ThePodcastReport.com and his product offers, offerings and training courses, etc.). And we see how this can be a mutual benefit — although many podcasters (such as myself and Daniel J Lewis) actually give interviews and deliver bumpers without expecting anything in return.

We also discuss what a “bumper” is for a podcaster, and how this can be a tool that will help to advance your podcast, improve content, as well as grow relationships with other podcasters. And, of course, it goes without saying that a podcaster should reciprocate giving back to the former podcaster by supplying a corresponding bumper.

With several examples from our own experience, our perspectives of podcaster courtesy still remain sound today. We hope that this episode is of value to the new and aspiring podcasters, as well as all the other podcasters in the podosphere.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis of theaudacitytopodcast.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

417- Podcasting Pioneer — the Doug Welch story

Note: In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver a repurposed episode that is an earlier interview with Doug Welch, one of the earliest podcasters — someone who is a real “Podcast Pioneer”. This repurposed episode is complete and not edited, but it still has a lot of good, evergreen content. It was originally prepared for a prior podcast show called “Boomers for Startups” (which has now podfaded).

It is the Doug Welch story which describes how his back catalog of content from a prior job became the main storage and archive for his very successful podcast which was called “Career Opportunities.”

As a matter of fact, the episode that posted in his podcast show, Career Opportunities, at the time of this writing used the term “New Normal” some six years before the pandemic (when it was used time and time again by the media).

But as you will hear in this audio interview, Doug did not stop there. He had this podcast run for over 10 years. And it is still now in Apple Podcasts under Career Opportunities, where he has several episodes that are of interest for any type of new media creator — podcasters, screencasters, authors, bloggers, etc. And you will also get to know more of Doug Welch “behind the scenes.”

He also started five other podcasts, as well as screencasts for video on his YouTube channels. He also is an author of several books, as well as a part-time yearly theater producer for enjoyment. He considers himself as a teacher — but just not in the classroom (as his wife is a University professor).

And, in addition, he also has volunteered his time and service to assist in setting up conferences for the high-tech and podcasting world in the BarCamp style and format. And you can also hear how he had to curb some of his activities and focus his time on planned programs, due to his health issues and his work.

And he started his flagship podcast of Career Opportunities in 2004, way before most of the early podcasters were on the map. As he said in this audio episode, of the 24 shows that had content on the early platform with Adam Curry, his was one of them.

Although this episode is really from his back catalog, Doug keeps posting updated episodes today. We encourage you to sign up and register for his show, for he is one of the few pioneers (aka “venerable elders”) in podcasting that is still publishing content which is of value to the newer and aspiring podcasters.

You can see the website of DouglasEWelch.com for more information on his programs, podcasts and his life projects.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Douglas E Welch. All rights reserved.

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podcast

416- Podcasting update with Adam Curry

In this episode of podcastreporter.com, we focus on a podcast show called NewMediaShow.com with Todd Cochrane — because this show had a special guest, Adam Curry of No Agenda.”

In a recent episode of Todd Cochrane’s podcast show, Adam Curry took a deeper dive into the beginnings of the podosphere and his own role in creating the function of podcasting, along with Dave Winer. So notably called “The Podfather,” Adam recounts his beginnings from 2000 in the world of audio and his frustration at having to wait enormous times for any download over the internet of either audio or video.

In addition, Adam also goes into what a successful podcast show requires (e.g., number one rule is that “you have to have an outstanding product”), and especially the business model for donations that his show, No Agenda, uses from his “producers” (that’s right — no listeners, for all are producers), as well as other resources. This model is called the “Value for Value” model — and Adam spends a great deal of time in the interview to explain this, with some examples.

You can listen to the entire interview in episode number 384 of newmediashow.com (where you can choose to download it or listen to it). I highly encourage you to consume this content, as it brings about the story of podcasting and how it got started, as well as a look into the psyche and personality of Adam Curry — then and now.

We hope that you find this episode in NewMediaShow.com of great value for yourself, as a podcaster in this space.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and NewMediaShow.com and Todd Cochrane. All rights reserved.