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674- Video podcasts becoming more popular now

In this episode, we reflect on an article from this week in May about how video podcasts are making a strong push into popularity over audio podcasts — and note: we are not saying that ALL videos are podcasts, but that video components may be included in podcasts adhering to the definition of podcasts.

The article is by Gloria Escandon and it came out in Forbes Magazine recently about how video podcasting is growing.

Remember: to find out what the REAL requirements of being a podcast are, you can visit articles by Dave Jackson in his podcast show, School of Podcasting.

Some of the others mentioned in this podcast are Matt Cox, podcaster for Brunch with the Brits.net, as well as Dave Jackson. Matt is also a co-host for the podcast show called 2030podcast.com (which is a sister podcast show to this one).

Thank you for listening.

Copyright (c) 2024, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

526- Lessons learned after 15 years of Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss my own lessons learned and experiences of value gained from podcasting for the last 15 years, when I became a podcaster — with having been within the podosphere as a listener for the prior 2 years (and with listening to over 100 podcast shows per week, as there were not as many shows as there are now).

In a recent edition of the podnews.net newsletter, we had an article that spoke about what experiences and benefits were learned by someone who had just celebrated seven years in podcasting (you can find it at Bruce Wawrzyniak, the host of Now Hear This who celebrated his 7th anniversary of the show with 367 episodes). Well, as a podcaster with over double the time in the podosphere as an active podcaster, and with over 1000 episodes and 2 million downloads, I wanted to also give you some perspective of an old-timer podcaster.

Now, by old-timer, I don’t mean to state that I was one of the original podcasters when the podosphere started. By no means. There were folks like Gary Leland, Todd Cochrane, CC Chapman, Paul Colligan, Rob Walch and Dave Jackson (among others) that already had podcast shows — and some for almost 2 years since 2004. Among them, I seemed to be a newcomer. And my podcast show that I promoted at the time of the early Podcast and Portable Media conference seemed pale in comparison to the work of those earlier maestros.

But now, after 15 years of podcasting, my current flagship podcast show of PodcastReporter.com has between 500 and 600 episodes; my other show of TheStrugglingBiz.com has over 100 episodes; and my other podcast show of 2030podcast.com has over 50 episodes — and the latter is done with a co-host, Matt Cox (a podcaster with over 12 years of his show, Brunch with the Brits.net).

So the question is: what experiences have I learned from podcasting in 15 years? and what is the suggestion that I deliver to new and aspiring podcasters (even though these will never be posted in the podnews.net newsletter)?

  • I have learned that technical skills are important, but that they are not the most important — what is of greatest importance is the value that your show and its episodes will provide to your audience;
  • I have learned that your communication with your audience is critical — and that goes for any planned or unplanned absences (remember — even great podcasters like Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show disappeared for almost six months without leaving word to his audience of any planned or unplanned absence.  But he later made up for it by publishing an episode explaining his forced absence, and then proceeded to return to the podosphere in many formats. And he keeps being a subject matter expert in his own right);
  • I have received value in the faith and commitment of my audience in staying with me, providing me with feedback and commentary, as well as giving word-of-mouth promotion to others in the podosphere;
  • I have received value in seeing the number of downloads increasing for each show (in fact, both The Struggling Entrepreneur podcast show — which has podfaded — and this show have had over 1 million downloads each, and still growing), as well as the popularity of my shows increasing;
  • I have received value when our 2030podcast.com show received promotion on an international live stream — they played episodes from this show to their audiences; they stated that this was a “quality show” to the audience; and they praised the quality of the audio, as well, to their audience and live stream. And they did this WITHOUT any requests from me or any paid promotion or marketing or sales. This occurred because they found value in the show; and as of the date of this episode, it still continues to be published with various episodes and still continues to receive admiration from listeners who found value in the content of this show, even though none of the serendipity results were planned;
  • I found value in other podcasters whom I have met in person or on the web — either a conferences or in remote interviews which I conducted for many of my 16 concurrent podcast shows that I had in 2010, and which I had to whittle down due to health and personal family issues with which I had to deal in 2016 to 2018;
  • and finally, I learned that the VALUE FOR VALUE model applies to podcasters who deliver good content to listeners. I learned this when the value was “treasure” (i.e., monetization), as well as “tech” (i.e., learning valuable technical skills and models), as well as “frienship” value (i.e., starting great relationships with the pundits of podcasting and other podcasters).

And these are just a few of the lessons learned from this podcaster in my 15 years as a podcaster and 17 years within the podosphere.

So, if you think that seven years is a lot of time to learn about value in podcasting, try learning from the podcasters who have spent more than double that time within their craft. This will help deliver lessons learned to the new and aspiring podcasters, so that they can improve their skills and become better deliverers of value to their audiences.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and 2030podcast.com and Matt Cox. All rights reserved.

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podcast

549- Podcasting recognition for top podcast overseas

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of Recognitions of excellence and quality in the international aspects of podcasting today.

In particular, we are highlighting this type of podcasting acclaim given to Matt Cox and his show, Brunch with the Brits. Matt also has a co-host named John Lingard, from Lincoln, UK, since both share the passion for BBC old-time radio content. Below is a photo of Matt Cox.

 

We came to discover this type of recognition in podcasting from an email that was sent to me from Matt (who, by the way, is my co-host from another podcast show that we deliver usually every week or two since 2018, called The 2030 Podcast.).

From Mark Anderson, the author of the note from Best Startup UK, here is the email that was sent to Matt that explains the subject of “Nominated as a Top  British Radio Podcast by Best Startup”:

“I hope your podcast is doing well. 

I’m just reaching out to let you know we mentioned your podcast in our article about british radio podcasts. I hope it drives some new listeners! 

The article can be found here: https://BestStartup.co.uk/?p=9356

Any shares or backlinks from press pages pages would be greatly appreciated! Backlinks help us rank for relevant keywords and drive more targeted traffic to your podcast long term.

If you want to get some promotion from our broader network and hopefully drive some more sales, you can post on your website a post for your blog titled something like “We Were Nominated as a Top  British Radio Podcast by Best Startup”. Send us a link to the post and we will share across our network! 

Thanks,
Best Startup Team

P.S. Feel to follow us on: Linkedin: Best Startup UK.”


So in this episode that is casual and unrehearsed, we discuss with Matt what this award means to him as a podcaster with over 13 years of podcasting experience, and what this exposure may do for him the near future, as well as the long haul.


We hope you enjoy this story of Matt’s type of “success” in getting this totally unsolicited recognition and response for his flagship podcast show of Brunch With The Brits.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

471- Double-ender recordings may do it better for podcast interviews

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of double- enders from the viewpoint of the recent article in thepodcasthost.com titled “What are the benefits of double-ender recording?”

Now, in this podcast series, we have explained what a double-ender recording is (i.e., similar to how it is defined in the article:  “where both participants record their own sides of a remote conversation; these are then synced together in post-production — it can make you sound like you’re in the same room as your guest, even if you’re recording on different continents.”


In addition to describing the double-ender, Matthew Boudreau goes on to state the benefits of a double-ender for recording interviews at a distance.  He also elaborates on these points:

  • “Best Method: Hand Recorder”;
  • Professional tip on “syncing”;
  • Good methods using Smartphone Recording;
  • Professional tip on “microphone choice”;
  • “In a pinch: computer recording”
  • Conclusion with implementing double-ender recording

For this podcaster, I have been using the double-ender since 2006 starting with a handy program called Power-Gramo (which was withdrawn several years ago). However, this program was integrated beautifully with Skype and allowed my audio recording to be on one track and my guest’s recording to be on another track. I would get them both and then proceed to synch the audio very easily, then levelate it and perform EQ, and then finalize a quality mp3 audio recording.

As you will hear in this audio episode, for my podcasts with guests, I have used multiple mics and multiple systems for recording double enders — from Zoom H1, H2, H4n portable recorders, as well as interfaces with Shure SM7 and SM58 microphones — to today’s use of a Samson Go-mic with a backup recording using a Zoom H4n in the other side.

The only problem I have encountered during a heatwave is the ambient noise that can arise with my co-host having his air conditioner running at bull-blast in the same room with his recording equipment. This then forces me to do noise reduction, which then can alter his audio quality. Another example is when his mic was too close to his computer and received lots of internal noise in his background. But other than those, a near-quiet environment usually will allow double-enders to sound as if the recording was in a studio with each person sitting next to each other and the result is good audio.

So, I would suggest that you, as an aspiring podcaster who wishes to publish guest interviews, should review this article and decide on which model would work best for you and your guests in creating a final mp3 audio to provide value for your customers as they listen to your interview resulting from a double-ender.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and thepodcasthost.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

458- Serendipity in Podcasting can help in growing your show

In this episode of The Podcast Reporterwe discuss a case study in which a podcast show can gain discovery and popularity within a podcast network — and how serendipity can occur to help grow the podcast show to possible success. And this is with a current podcast show called 2030podcast.com . This is a show that has two co-hosts — and I am one of them, along with Matt Cox, a podcaster of his own show, Brunch with the Brits.

First, we review a bit of the background of this show.

In 2014, I myself had a meeting with Adam Curry (aka The Podfather) in Austin, Texas. The meeting saw us actually do 3 interviews and have a lunch while discussed various topics in motion pictures (e.g., For Greater Glory and We Were Soldiers, etc.) and podcasting. And one of the interviews that I was able to record with him was concerning the theme of a podcast show that I had recently created and announced — the 2030podcast.com show. While Adam Curry initially gave me the idea for this show on his No Agenda podcast show, he was glad that I was able to take action to produce this show — and our interview served as the first episode of this show. called 2030podcast.com.


While I tried to get the podcast show off the ground, family and personal medical problems (along with the dementia and death of my mother) kept me out of podcasting. But later on, I resurrected the podcast show, and then I included a co-host named Matt Cox (a podcaster from his own podcast show of Brunch with the Brits) to share the mic with me in creating our thoughts on what would be our vision of the world of 2030 — including many of the ideas discussed by Adam Curry and myself in the 2014 interview.


The Current status of 2030podcast.com

As Matt Cox and myself created and published our episodes starting in October of 2018, our teamwork, dialog, banter and reciprocal respect increased — and, in my opinion, so did the value of our content for the intended audience (which were the producers of the No Agenda podcast show, along with the listeners of the Grumpy Old Bens show and the Randumb Thoughts podcast).

And so it was around episode # 14 in 2020 that I was able to hear that particular episode of 2030Podcast.com being broadcast on the NoAgendaStream.com.  Now, neither myself nor Matt Cox had been actively seeking promotion for our show. But someone who valued our content was able to promote our show and have it actually be published and broadcast on the stream. In fact, in one episode of the No Agenda show (# 1276) during the live broadcast, the ending of the episode has Adam Curry state that what would follow next on the stream would be the 2030 Podcast episode. And it did, in entirety.


Now, what could I have thought about this?

Serendipity? Yes, insofar as how Charlton Heston described it as a random act of positive activity that delivers fortunate results. Or, as the wikipedia definition states:  “…a happy accident…Serendipity is an unplanned fortunate discovery.”

And so what can serendipity mean for the podcaster?

Well, if you encounter serendipity in your podcasting career or show or business, you may end up with a happy accident — one that you were NOT pursuing, but that landed “in your lap” to cause a fortunate result for you and your show.

For myself and Matt, this means that we can grow our listeners, our audience and our show by being on a network (a stream) of engaged listeners that can only help us to increase the VALUE of our show to them.

For you, as a podcaster, we recommend that you, too, can be available for events and activities that can deliver serendipity to you by creating the best content that you have and being the best, consistent and value-based podcaster that you can be.

How can this be a preparation for serendipity?

Well, the final example cited here is from an introduction to the movie Day of the Jackal by the late Robert Osborne from his TCM channel. This situation had Fred Zinnemann (the director of the film) see a play (which he said was not very good) with an actor named Edward Fox, who delivered a performance which really impresssed Zinnemann. And thus, Fox was cast as the lead role. And the reason:  a performer should always deliver his best, “because you never know who is watching.”

And, thus, a podcaster can never know who is listening — and which results may occur from the “performance” of delivering great value in the podcast show. So we hope that you can receive serendipity in your environment to have your show succeed.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

404- Podcasting with a co-host

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on podcasting with a co-host. We also refer to an article in themedium.com that was written by Joseph Anderson and deals with issues of co-host podcast recording.

Several points refer to respect for, and planning with, your co-host for best success — especially if both of your are employed or if distance keeps you quite distant from each other.

For this podcast reporter, I do record remotely several episodes of my podcast show called 2030podcast.com with my co-host, Matt Cox (who is a podcaster in his own right with his show, Brunch with the Brits). As a matter of fact, we propose this as a case in point to which you can examine in a casual and unrehearsed manner.

And finally, the topic of co-host issues was addressed very successfully by podcaster Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast in his back catalog of episodes. I heartily recommend that you may wish to review this content, for his detail is great in trying to cover all the angles that you may examine.

We hope that you can have a great working relationship with any potential co-host and have a successful podcast with great content and a great following.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and themedium.com and 2030podcast.com and Joseph Anderson. All rights reserved.

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podcast

392- Remote recording as possibly the new normal

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we discuss the possibility of remote recording for podcast interviews, discussions and dialog being the “new normal” due to the plandemic situation of the Chinese Whan virus (aka Covid-19 and Corona virus).

Due to the lockdown and isolation mandated during this plandemic, the main communications cannot be done in person at conferences or across the table. Thus, they are relegated to the following:

  • remote interviews via Skype or internet or online tools;
  • “double-ender” interviews or conversations or dialog, where each podcaster records his own audio and then sends it to the remote other podcaster for final synchronization, editing and finalization of production to create the mp3 file;
  • social media online tools such as Zoom, Skype, Squadcast (just to name a few);
  • any other “social distance” or “new distance” models of separation;
  • or the good old-fashioned telephone conversations recorded with such non-high-tech tools as the smart phone speakers, etc.

Now I know that many podcasters do NOT like the phrase “new normal.” So the description, above, will serve to describe the new environment during the isolation and lock-down period.

I do conduct remote interviews with my co-host, Matt Cox of Brunch With the Brits podcast — and we use the double-ender method to do the recording. I then receive the audio recording from Matt, and then I synchronize the tracks in one audio editing environment, and then I finally edit and produce the show to create the final mp3 file.

The episode also mentions other solutions for your research and discovery, so that you can then help to select the remote environment recording with your co-hosts and interviewees.

So, whatever remote recording interview software that you decide to use, we hope that you will create effective content for your podcast that you will produce in this new normal of virtual environments.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

352- Increased podcasts due to virus crisis

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we discuss the increase and growth of podcasting during the crisis of the Chinese Wuhan Virus (aka covid-19 or corona virus).

From this repurposed episode from March of 2020, we noticed the surge of new podcast shows being created, as well as the amount of new episodes being published.

This discussion is timely and attests to the situation that stared all of us podcasters in the face during the period of March, 2020.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.