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podcast

471- Double-ender recordings may do it better for podcast interviews

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of double- enders from the viewpoint of the recent article in thepodcasthost.com titled “What are the benefits of double-ender recording?”

Now, in this podcast series, we have explained what a double-ender recording is (i.e., similar to how it is defined in the article:  “where both participants record their own sides of a remote conversation; these are then synced together in post-production — it can make you sound like you’re in the same room as your guest, even if you’re recording on different continents.”


In addition to describing the double-ender, Matthew Boudreau goes on to state the benefits of a double-ender for recording interviews at a distance.  He also elaborates on these points:

  • “Best Method: Hand Recorder”;
  • Professional tip on “syncing”;
  • Good methods using Smartphone Recording;
  • Professional tip on “microphone choice”;
  • “In a pinch: computer recording”
  • Conclusion with implementing double-ender recording

For this podcaster, I have been using the double-ender since 2006 starting with a handy program called Power-Gramo (which was withdrawn several years ago). However, this program was integrated beautifully with Skype and allowed my audio recording to be on one track and my guest’s recording to be on another track. I would get them both and then proceed to synch the audio very easily, then levelate it and perform EQ, and then finalize a quality mp3 audio recording.

As you will hear in this audio episode, for my podcasts with guests, I have used multiple mics and multiple systems for recording double enders — from Zoom H1, H2, H4n portable recorders, as well as interfaces with Shure SM7 and SM58 microphones — to today’s use of a Samson Go-mic with a backup recording using a Zoom H4n in the other side.

The only problem I have encountered during a heatwave is the ambient noise that can arise with my co-host having his air conditioner running at bull-blast in the same room with his recording equipment. This then forces me to do noise reduction, which then can alter his audio quality. Another example is when his mic was too close to his computer and received lots of internal noise in his background. But other than those, a near-quiet environment usually will allow double-enders to sound as if the recording was in a studio with each person sitting next to each other and the result is good audio.

So, I would suggest that you, as an aspiring podcaster who wishes to publish guest interviews, should review this article and decide on which model would work best for you and your guests in creating a final mp3 audio to provide value for your customers as they listen to your interview resulting from a double-ender.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and thepodcasthost.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

394- Remote podcast recording from a browser

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss an article from Jacob Bozart of Resonate Recordings that outlines a remote recording for a podcast episode. This includes the “double-ender” method. And the post from Jacob has the diagram of how remote interviewing can be done with a double-ender for podcasting.

But with the information from Jacob, new podcasters can now have other methods to record remotely with just the browser and the Resonate Recordings tools.

We hope that you can choose the best price-performance tool that will be easy to learn and use for remote podcast recordings.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and

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podcast

392- Remote recording as possibly the new normal

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we discuss the possibility of remote recording for podcast interviews, discussions and dialog being the “new normal” due to the plandemic situation of the Chinese Whan virus (aka Covid-19 and Corona virus).

Due to the lockdown and isolation mandated during this plandemic, the main communications cannot be done in person at conferences or across the table. Thus, they are relegated to the following:

  • remote interviews via Skype or internet or online tools;
  • “double-ender” interviews or conversations or dialog, where each podcaster records his own audio and then sends it to the remote other podcaster for final synchronization, editing and finalization of production to create the mp3 file;
  • social media online tools such as Zoom, Skype, Squadcast (just to name a few);
  • any other “social distance” or “new distance” models of separation;
  • or the good old-fashioned telephone conversations recorded with such non-high-tech tools as the smart phone speakers, etc.

Now I know that many podcasters do NOT like the phrase “new normal.” So the description, above, will serve to describe the new environment during the isolation and lock-down period.

I do conduct remote interviews with my co-host, Matt Cox of Brunch With the Brits podcast — and we use the double-ender method to do the recording. I then receive the audio recording from Matt, and then I synchronize the tracks in one audio editing environment, and then I finally edit and produce the show to create the final mp3 file.

The episode also mentions other solutions for your research and discovery, so that you can then help to select the remote environment recording with your co-hosts and interviewees.

So, whatever remote recording interview software that you decide to use, we hope that you will create effective content for your podcast that you will produce in this new normal of virtual environments.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

362- Remote Podcast interviews using double-enders

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss what it takes to perform a remote interview without any intervening software program.

This recording can be done with each party recording their own audio during the telephone interview, and then forwarding the audio to the person elected to do the final editing, synchronizing and creating the final mp3.

The steps are given in an informal manner during this instructional audio episode.

Referred to during this episode is the Pre-flight podcast recording checklist from Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast.

Good luck with any double-ender remote interviews that you may implement.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.