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555- When Podcasting could be last arena of free speech

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a theme of the possibility of censorship in podcasting for the podcaster, as well as the infringement of free speech to those whose passion could be curtailed by not being allowed to publish and distribute their message.

In the area of podcasting, I wanted to expand on the theme that Dave Jackson, podcaster, of the School of Podcasting, spoke about in an earlier episode which was titled “Preserving podcasting as a platform for free speech…”

In this episode, Dave interviews Adam Curry of the No Agenda podcast show (which he publishes with his co-host, John C Dvorak) and talks about podcasting and its future with Dave, and especially how podcasting can be one of the last areas of free speech in this woke-filled culture.

So, in this hour of the published episode from Dave, the topic of free speech is touched upon.  With the censorship of the lame-stream media and the news media so strong in the broadcast area of the media, this was very important to me.

I saw what the cancel culture and censorship results were from “reviews” of podcasting. I got this very early in my career of podcasting, and I quickly had a bad taste in my mouth from a couple of reviews that were just opinions and baseless (and remember, opinions are like “elbows” — everybody has a couple ūüôā. And thus, when I re-started the web site and the podcast show publications for this particular show, it did not matter to me that I would not be included or promoted on the Apple platform or any other platform. I did not care for reviews by mindless people who are not like-minded and only want to complain or publish negativity in “reviews.” And this has turned out to be a great result for my podcast show. In fact, this podcast show has grown its audience without any marketing or sales or promotion — it has developed as a good resource for its own audience, and I said to myself “the heck with reviews — they are meaningless, anyway, because the social proof that they claim to provide is not worth the woke-based environment that it brings, and the aggravation of the negative comments are not worth even considering.” And thus, I have not looked back at reviews or subscriptions for these shows that I currently have.

And so, I could understand very well the topic of censorship and cancel culture being discussed by Dave and Adam in the episode on the School of Podcasting.¬† And, as Adam Curry states: “podcasting is one of the last few openly distributed eco-systems” that promotes free speech and avoids censorship and cancel culture at the whim of the ideologies of management of these firms — at least, on the part of the media host that will provide your episodes to the distribution platform to get your messages to the audience who want it.


Thus, I would heartily suggest that you consume this episode to understand both the free speech element of the eco-system and how the benefits of Podcasting 2.0.

And as for this podcaster, my view is: as long as the media host stays out of the business of cancel culture or censoring my messages (and the signal for this is seeing that a “moderator” is appointed as lord of content to allow only the ideology of management to be published), then podcasting can actually be the last frontier of free speech — and it would not be a platform of brainwashed or woke directions, but that of free speech.

We hope that you enjoy the content of the episode interview that is given in these show notes from Dave’s podcast show, and that you can also understand and appreciate the nature of the eco-system of podcasting as an area of free speech for your message.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

514- Considerations for podfading — some strategies to deal with it

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we repurpose a previous episode that deals with a review of many considerations for podfading. If you are experiencing some of the symptoms described in this audio episode, we deliver some strategies to deal with the beginnings of podfading and perhaps avoid it altogether.

As you will hear in this audio episode, the 35 minutes are spent with descriptions that lead us to consider podfading and then think about some strategies to either podfade in the right way or to deal with the thoughts of podfading and not do so because of a resurrection of the passion and the good environment that may exist for you.

We give some good examples of podcasters who have created other businesses and podcast networks and communities — such as Daniel J Lewis and his Podcasters Society. And we deal with situations where you may have a co-host — e.g., the No Agenda Show with Adam Curry and John C Dvorak.

We hope that this evergreen content can assist you in any way so that any possible thoughts of podfading (for whatever reason cited) can be dealt with in a positive manner that will help you overcome the environment that leads to this thinking, and then help you to steer your shows and your business in the right direction for you to become successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis and PodcastersSociety.com and noagendashow.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

513- Successful podcast path — content creator to thought leader

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we repurpose a prior episode — and we do this once every year at mid-year. The topic is a review of the steps needed to become a thought leader.

In this episode, we examine the four steps in the journey to becoming a¬†successful content creator, especially for the podcaster.¬†Does “success” mean making lots of money? Some of the “newbies” in the podosphere are making 7 figures, and there are a few who¬†proudly proclaim their revenues and share them online.

But, no, that may not be the measure of success.

Does “success mean having enormous stats? Some of the¬†“newbies” have gazillions of downloads, subscribers, sponsors,¬†listens, views, audience numbers, etc.

But, no that may not be the measure of success.

According to a couple of key podcasters, the true meaning of¬†success lies elsewhere in “thought leadership” — but also¬†with the positive results both in stats and revenue streams.

This content for this episode was inspired by two podcasters, both who have had over 10 years of experience:

(1) Paul Colligan, podcaster of THE PODCAST REPORT; and

(2) Chris Brogan — podcaster, blogger, author and trainer, among¬†many other things.

It was Paul Colligan who called myself a “luminary” several years ago in his podcast episode, when he described me.

It was also Chris Brogan who described the real measure of¬†success monetarily, but also emphasized the importance of¬†“thought leadership.”

Together, they inspired the description of the 4-step journey from podcaster to thought-leader (the latter being the real measure of success, in my humble opinion, as the other mentioned victories in the journey have either been preludes or learning-steps).

As you will hear in this audio episode, the four steps to becoming¬†a “successful” CONTENT CREATOR are detailed and described as:

(1) Subject matter expert that develops into a true “luminary”;

(2) Solution-provider or problem-solver;

(3) Trusted advisor; and then,

(4) THOUGHT LEADER.

After listening to this episode, the rhetorical question for you is¬†“where are you in this journey today, and what is your personal¬†and business target in steps for your future?”

Here are some of the links from the cases-in-point and the resources mentioned in this audio episode:

– THE REFERRAL ENGINE, book by John Jantsch

 

– THE SPEED OF TRUST, book by Dr. Steven Covey

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=the+speed+of+trust+by+covey&tag=googhydr-20&index=stripbooks&hvadid=49856365105&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=8732313814208953106&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_28xgmol8ct_b

– PAUL COLLIGAN, podcaster, author & blogger at www.thepodcastreport.com

– CHRIS BROGAN, author, trainer, blogger at www.chrisbrogan.com

– SCOTT JOHNSON, podcaster at www.computertutorflorida.com

РLON NAYLOR, screencaster and podcaster and blogger at  www.screencapturevideo.com

Copyright (c) 2015, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

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podcast

512- Different types of -preneurs to start up a small business

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we¬†discuss the various methods of having your podcast assist in starting a small business, but not as the typical entrepreneur. We focus on the different types of “-preneurs” today.

As you will hear in this audio episode (which has been repurposed from another episode), we focus on several types of small business entities — and one of them may suit you, especially if you are a new or aspiring podcaster, or want to become a professional podcaster that wants to create revenue streams for your podcast show in your business.


So whether you wish to become an entrepreneur (in the conventional definition), or whether circumstances have forced you to become a “necessity-preneur”; or whether your end of service in the military is appropriate for you to become a “vetrepreneur“; or your strong desires have you wish to become a “want-repreneur”; or whether you are wanting to become a present-day “hobby-preneur” who will later monetize the podcast and create a startup as a result — the field of podcasting may suit your needs and give you the ability to enter the world of startups and small businesses with a jump-start.

The image of the Vetrepreneur site is at:

102- Vetrepreneur

And there are courses that can help you from the ground up to create a startup. One mentioned in the audio podcast is the course from Stanford University called “How to start a startup” — which still has much evergreen content at:

https://www.classcentral.com/course/independent-how-to-start-a-startup-2572

So if you are an aspiring or new podcaster with thoughts of becoming a small business owner, we hope that you will find one of these “-preneurs” suitable for you as your entry into the world of entrepreneurship.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

549- Podcasting recognition for top podcast overseas

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of Recognitions of excellence and quality in the international aspects of podcasting today.

In particular, we are highlighting this type of podcasting acclaim given to Matt Cox and his show, Brunch with the Brits. Matt also has a co-host named John Lingard, from Lincoln, UK, since both share the passion for BBC old-time radio content. Below is a photo of Matt Cox.

 

We came to discover this type of recognition in podcasting from an email that was sent to me from Matt (who, by the way, is my co-host from another podcast show that we deliver usually every week or two since 2018, called The 2030 Podcast.).

From Mark Anderson, the author of the note from Best Startup UK, here is the email that was sent to Matt that explains the subject of “Nominated as a Top ¬†British Radio Podcast by Best Startup‚ÄĚ:

“I hope your podcast is doing well.¬†

I’m just reaching out to let you know we mentioned your podcast in our article about british radio podcasts. I hope it drives some new listeners! 

The article can be found here: https://BestStartup.co.uk/?p=9356. 

Any shares or backlinks from press pages pages would be greatly appreciated! Backlinks help us rank for relevant keywords and drive more targeted traffic to your podcast long term.

If you want to get some promotion from our broader network and hopefully drive some more sales, you can post on your website a post for your blog titled something like ‚ÄúWe Were Nominated as a Top ¬†British Radio Podcast by Best Startup‚ÄĚ. Send us a link to the post and we will share across our network!¬†

Thanks,
Best Startup Team

P.S. Feel to follow us on: Linkedin: Best Startup UK.”


So in this episode that is casual and unrehearsed, we discuss with Matt what this award means to him as a podcaster with over 13 years of podcasting experience, and what this exposure may do for him the near future, as well as the long haul.


We hope you enjoy this story of Matt’s type of “success” in getting this totally unsolicited recognition and response for his flagship podcast show of Brunch With The Brits.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

511- Some lessons podcasters can learn from D-Day

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we contemplate on some possible lessons learned from the experience of D-Day on June 6, 1944. And this is especially memorable, as this episode is being published the day before the 77th anniversary of Operation Overlord — i.e., the invasion of France in World War II (both the airborne and the sea-landing operations).

(1) You should not plan everything to the nth detail and not budge for any reason — as this may cause delay and unnecessary frustration of correcting the content over and over again. Some thoughts on this are:

  • Daniel J Lewis tried to edit his initial podcast episodes so that they would be absolutely perfect — but this led him to delay launching his show and posting episodes for over a year. This delay was really a negative blot on his history and it just slowed down his success.
  • If you fall for this type of negative situation, you would then be subject to the syndrome that Charlie “Tremendous” Jones (a sales and motivational speaker) calls the “Production to Perfection” model. If you have this type of situation, then you may NEVER get around to publishing your relevant content. Because the content can go stale, your edits may not become relevant and never be used. Why? Because you will be saying to yourself “Just one more tweak; oh, and another tweak…” and then your episode may never see the light of day, because perfection is something that does not really exist in our worlds.
  • In D-Day, the plans were so extensive that this military operation was the most detailed project in the history of the world (with a close second being the Apollo 11 project — the launch to the moon in 1969). But when the paratroopers landed in the flooded fields, and when the beaches were hit with the landing barges — then all the best laid plans of the allies were worthless. It was the initiative of the landing forces and the paratroopers that changed their plans to suit the new situation that saved the day for the Allies.
  • So, too, can your podcast shows be “just good enough” to publish, and then you can chalk up the learning that you have from your current episodes to improve the next episode and use that experience to help your workflow and practices become better. You will see that your audience will be understanding, especially if your show is new. Thus, get started when you feel it is appropriate — and NOT perfect — and publish your episodes. You don’t want to wallow in the podosphere aimlessly when your perfect planning seems to go wrong and you must adapt to the conditions of reality for getting your show off the ground and improving it for the next episode.

(2) You should be open for new and changed ideas, in spite of plans that have gone wrong, to continue your show with good content.

  • In D-Day, the American 4th Infantry Division landed on the wrong beach. Did this stop the advance? Not in the least. As the Assistant Division commander said on the beach when confronted with the possibility that the reinforcements may land on the correct beach and not the wrong beach: “The reinforcements will have to follow us, no matter where we go. We are starting the war from right here. Let’s go inland.” (dialogue taken from the book and the movie from Cornelius Ryan’s content of The Longest Day).
  • So, too, you can learn and adapt from the situations from which you learn when you are thrown into a new area that you did not plan for, and when you encounter new possibilities. You may end up telling yourself that this is where you start, and you can then incorporate new experiences into your workflow and content creation, content publication and content promotion and marketing.

And there are other instances where either serendipity or a rude awakening can ignite new and better ways for you to deal with the speed-bump or road-block that you may encounter in podcasting.

We hope that these lessons from D-Day can help you to adapt any potential derailment of your podcast plans and help shape them into a new workflow that will not only improve your podcast development and publication, but also help to make you a more successful podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

547- Ideas for preparing Podcast audits and interviews

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the themes of professional planning that can be recommended when preparing a podcast show and episodes as a professional podcaster.

These themes and topics come from a podcast episode by Adam Schaeuble of the podcast show called Podcasting Business School.

Now, although the main thread of this episode intended to be focused on sales for your podcast, there are lots of smaller gems of suggestions that are discussed, and which could be of value to you and your show.

Here, several topics are discussed in the first half of the episode:

  • What service for scheduling and its cost (as suggested by Adam);

  • What you should be asking for besides “name” and “email” when someone schedules with you for the first time (e.g., for an interview in a podcast show);

  • The key series of questions that Adam asks when he is doing a one- on-one meeting or interview, or in a discovery session;

  • What Adam sees other podcasters adding to their interview scheduling form that could be worth a try;

  • In the 2nd half of this episode, Adam does a “podcast audit” (which is a program promoted by Adam for newer podcasters);

  • And finally, Adam gives some ideas for dialing in on a niche and rebranding.


  • For this podcaster, I would suggest that a newer podcaster consume the content (especially the first half of the episode) so that some key questions may be given consideration and possibly should be asked in many instances — especially for interviews and preparation workflow.

Many times, experienced podcasters (such as Adam) have learned the hard way the skills that include what works best in situations for interviews, having guests on shows, themes and other general information that can be discovered within a “podcast audit” — but Adam is giving you these highlights for free.

And if you do this before launching many episodes or your main show, you may be able to prepare a good habit for your workflow (especially for podcast guests or interviews).

I, myself, learned the hard way in 2006 about interviews, preparation and planning for guesting in podcasting — mainly because there were almost no resources or experience that dealt with these topics. And so, we had to learn about it on our own and refine our own tasks to make our podcast episodes better for our guests and interviews.

We hope that you can find value in the suggestions for an “audit” that are given by Adam in this episode, and that the VALUE can be delivered in final form by having a great episode with your guests.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.