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podcast

552- Podcast consumption vs Social Media quick-hit

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver a REPURPOSED episode (it was episode 101 of this show) where we discuss the theme from Paul Colligan of The Podcast Report and Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting about the value and results from reviewing a podcast episode and show vs. the Social Media post (or what Paul Colligan refers to as “the quick hit.”).

As you will hear in this repurposed episode, the comparison and contrast is that of a requested deliverable (usually by subscription) like a podcast episode that is designed for CONSUMPTION as opposed to the “shiny object” like the social media post that usually results in just a momentary quick hit.


As for myself, I have been off the social media for now quite a few years, and it has been a healthy and remarkable experience — healthy in both body and mind and soul. In other words, as Adam Curry of the No Agenda show states, I am “OTG” or “off the grid.”

I firmly agree with what Paul Colligan summarizes in his article, and what the end thought of this podcast episode is — that social media posts are momentary, quick hits of emotion where you are being spoken down to, as well as brainwashed. And also, the podcast episode is a deliverable where you can do some thinking, contemplating, and judging or acting upon the result — in other words, CONSUMING.

Yes, this is consumption of the podcast vs. emotional momentary quick hits of social media without having the real benefits of consumption.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Dave Jackson and schoolofpodcasting.com and Paul Colligan and ThePodcastReport.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

596- Tips on uploading your podcast

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some general hints delivered to you (as an aspiring or new podcaster) from Ben Krueger, podcaster and consultant who has a site called cashflowpodcasting.com.

Ben has always been a great consultant and provider of good information for the new and aspiring podcaster since I have known him (from the time that we shared a table together in the exhibit hall of the first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas). His advice and his free deliverables and pdf files contain good information most of the time, and I would highly encourage you to see his multi-step approach to planning, producing, publishing and promoting a podcast.

In an episode on 30 November 2021, Ben gives several hints and tips for uploading a podcast. But he goes a couple of steps further and recommends what some actionable steps would be to publish the podcast show and episodes, as well as some words about streaming your show episodes and areas of increased publicity for your web site of your show.


In an article for 30 November 2021 titled “How to upload a podcast,” Ben makes three strong suggestions for actionable steps in the distribution of a podcast, as well as the upload of episodes:

  • “Upload your podcast files to a podcast hosting service.
  • Submit your episode to all streaming platforms at once.
  • Publish episode players from your host to your own website.”

He then provides sections of the articles with more details about the process that a podcaster should consider about uploads, distribution and promotion:

  • How to upload a podcast episode;
  • The cost of uploading a podcast episode in your show;
  • How to submit your first podcast episode;
  • Where to post your first podcast;
  • How to post a podcast for free (some suggested ideas);
  • Would Spotify be a good choice for a free posting?
  • A discussion about the most popular podcast platform;
  • How to upload a podcast episode to your own site;
  • Some final ideas about suggested tools and templates: “Initially, it seems logical to use the website template offered by the hosting service to create a website for your show. Further down the line, you could explore creating a website using a third-party service that would potentially offer greater flexibility around the layout and design.”

For this podcaster, I have been using the templates and tools in which I learned during my initial period in podcasting many years ago. I have upgraded some of them, as I do wish to improve the speed of creation and publication of my episodes. I got a lot of them from the time when I did hire a consultant to help me with improving my initial podcasting — and that was Dave Jackson from The School of Podcasting.

There was also one aspect in Dave Jackson’s episode from November of 2021, in which he put out a request for podcasters to answer his “question of the month” for answering how much time is spent by a podcaster from the idea creation stage to the point where a podcast episode is released by pressing the PUBLISH button. It was interesting to see how podcasters have become more sophisticated in the area of creating and publishing their podcast episodes — including myself (I did contribute my discussion from my name of Sergeant Fred).

We hope that these ideas in the article, along with Dave Jackson’s episode, can help you to refine your uploading, publishing, streaming and distribution of your podcast episodes.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflorpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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Uncategorized

BONUS – 2021- Steps and time to create a podcast episode

In this BONUS EPISODE of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver an audio copy of some content that I sent to Dave Jackson (the podcaster for the School of Podcasting) to answer his “question of the month” for November, 2021. The question was: how much time does it take for you to create a podcast episode — from idea stage until you click PUBLISH and have your episode go live. By the way, Dave is the Author of the book titled “Profit from your Podcast.”

So, I responded with a five-minute audio section, which is played right after the intro content of this episode. Now you can see what it takes in steps and in time to create a “micro-cast” that is 10 minutes or shorter in length of time, as well as an interview episode, or an episode with a co-host.

I hope that you gain some value to understand what is required to create a podcast episode — both a short-form episode and then a 40-minute episode. If you are doing “double-enders,” then this episode may help you understand the steps it takes to create and release an episode.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Dave Jackson of schoolofpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

536- Get into Podcasting — a case for a podcast consultant

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the situation where an aspiring podcaster may want to start a podcast, but does not want to go through all the details about Apple and other providers to begin a podcast show and post episodes. They also don’t want to keep up with the rules and regulations, processes and procedures (which seem to be always changing frequently now) by Apple and other sites in order to create, test, post and publish episodes for your podcast show — they just want to create the content and publish it very easily.

So, one way of doing this (besides doing it by yourself and getting frustrated with the firms who do not call you back or take your technical support calls or answer questions in person but only by bots) is to go the route of using a podcast consultant until you understand the process and have a smooth running system that you can handle in the creation and posting and distribution of your content where you  want).


For this podcaster, I started podcasting 15 years ago. I used a free tutorial that was distributed online by Jason Van Orden (a podcaster at that time for the Podcasting Underground show). And soon, I realized that I needed a bit of education (which was not really available as it is today) by hiring a podcast consultant. In my case, I hired Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting. Using remote conversations and communications via the internet, he set me on my way on the path to podcasting, and from there, I was on my own. I did hire him later on when I set up various other podcast shows, so that he could set them up, post them, publish them during the time which I wanted to focus on new content for my current shows. And this worked out very well.

And since then, other podcast consultants announced that they wanted to assist aspiring podcasters to launch their shows — one of them was the Podcast Repairman from Gary Leland, as an example.

And because of these reasons, I can see a favorable argument for hiring a good podcast consultant (like Dave Jackson or Daniel J Lewis) to assist me with MY OWN instructions, restrictions and limitations as agreed by a written contract or one saved by audio or video recording to assist in setting up a podcast show and episodes, and leaving you a well-oiled machine for you, as a podcaster, to create and publish your content in the podosphere.

Now, for this podcaster, I have also been a podcast consultant for several years, and it was enjoyable and I have had good customers that thanked me for getting them started in the podosphere and delivering VALUE in the editing of content and “productizing” the episodes which they published. However, with medical problems and family emergencies, I had to withdraw from this podcasting career specialty and only to keep a customer or two that wanted only screencasting services (e.g., creating video tutorials for software products and services). I only focus now into podcast content creation, but I am no longer a podcast consultant to assist others in setting up their shows.

But if I were now an aspiring podcaster that wants to start a show and focus strictly on the content creation and publication, I would seriously consider getting a quote from a respected podcast consultant (with a good and long favorable history of grateful customers) to assist me in getting my show created, launched and set up as a “publishing machine.” And if I wanted to monetize my show after creating and publishing it, I would then use the suggestions given to me by authors and podcasters who have published content on how to successfully make money from their podcasts — especially like Dave Jackson with his latest book, Profit from your Podcast.

I hope that you, as an aspiring podcaster, will find success in starting your show — whether or not you decide to use a podcast consultant, so that your show will deliver great VALUE to your audience and help to get you on the road to success (especially if you wish to monetize your show).

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson and Daniel J Lewis and Gary Leland and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

580- Podcast show live streaming and show notes summit

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss and give a very high-level overview and review of two programs from our podcasters recently.

One was from Dave Jackson’s Ask the Podcast Coach show (co-hosted with Jim Collison of TheAverageGuy.tv); and the other was an educational webinar called The Show Notes Summit.

First, we review some comments (that some of the purist grumps will enjoy criticizing) in the live streaming and tech environments of podcasting. In the tech area, we experienced the pros and cons of the live streaming tool called riverside, which was used in a recent live podcast episode of Ask the Podcast Coach from Dave Jackson and Jim Collison. The poor video and audio quality was only surpassed when the system knocked you off and had to re-initialized.

This comment was echoed over and over again in the chat room (or “troll room,” if you will). It was even echoed in the discussion by myself and co-host Matt Cox (who is a co-host for 2030podcast.com and grumpyoldbears.com).

Comment is: bring back the quality live streaming with YouTube, as they had before.

My opinion was that the sad part about this “experiment” was that the co-hosts for Askthepodcastcoach.com did NOT warn the listeners ahead of time that there was an experimental session that would use a new tool for the session. And, yes, some listeners and viewers were left out, due to technical and other problems. So several listeners were left out — and there was, in my view, no reason why this had to happen without warning.

Now, would I, as a podcaster, use this for live streaming?

No, never — not on your life, as I had to painfully experience the poor audio and video on this stream. Enough said.


Another theme was the live webinar with Daniel J Lewis and Steve Stewart that dealt with show notes for episodes (yes, the Grumps probably did not enjoy paying the $9 USD fee for live attendance, mainly because grumps like only FREE webinars with no charge).

It was called the Show Notes Summit.

But, in my opinion, it was worth it.

Our view is that webinars like this are ideal for learning and communicating with the ideal group of like-minded individuals.

Why?

  • it goes no longer than 4 hours and many speakers that deliver value;
  • there is a live chat room that becomes very lively and helpful for issues that are brought up during the presentations;
  • there is a question/answer session at the end of each presentation, and it does not go longer than just a few minutes;
  • there was a choice that could have been made by a live attendee of the presentations, where for an additional $40 allows the individual to get the replay videos, charts, membership in  a slack group for community sharing and other premium deliverables.
  • there are great presenters and instructors, such as Daniel J Lewis, who gave a new view and approach in creating better show notes.

This whole webinar was a positive step for education, training and learning about creating and delivering show notes for podcast episodes — mainly due to the leadership of Steve Stewart, a podcaster and master of editing (i.e., he runs the Podcast Editor Academy).

And, in our opinion, the best session was delivered by award-winning podcaster, Daniel J Lewis (who has a show called The Audacity to Podcast, as well as other products for podcasting, which you can see on his site). He described how to use AI in helping you to create show notes for your episodes. In fact, he was demonstrating how AI can help you to get inspired for show notes — but NOT be a crutch to automatically write them for you and whip them out in a couple of seconds. The tool he used was Jarvis, which is promoted as a copywriting assistant.

We are looking forward to other webinars in the same format under the leadership of Steve Stewart and company.


One question that I did ask of Daniel J Lewis while I was in the chat room of the Show Notes Summit was for the time frame for an upcoming episode of The Audacity to Podcast. The reply I got from Daniel was that we could see something very soon.

I will be waiting with bated breath for that episode to appear.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Daniel J Lewis and Steve Stewart and David Jackson and Jim Collison. All rights reserved.

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podcast

528- Podcast quality from your interview guests

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a recent post in the podcastbusinessjournal.com from Dave Jackson, podcaster of the School of Podcasting, where the topic centered on the audio quality from your interviewee and to whom the blame should be leveled. The title of this post was also mentioned in the podnews.net newsletter, and it was: “Stop blaming your guest for bad audio.”

In this post, Dave mentions that you, the interviewer, is really to be held responsible for any episode interview where your guest has bad audio. Dave says that you are to blame for letting bad audio be recorded and published in your podcast show interviews.

And Dave delivers to us several options so that you would not have to deal with sloppy or bad audio in your published interview — for example:

  •  Dave says: “You control what guests make it to your listener’s ears.”
  • Just as a potential prospect may ask you for examples from your portfolio of either art, podcasts, videos, etc., so, too, you can do the same to qualify (and later vet) a potential interviewee:  “When I have people pitch me to be on my show, if they’ve done their homework and connected their expertise to my audience (which 98% of them don’t) one of the first things I’m going to ask is, “Do you have a link to a previous interview so I can hear your audience quality?”
  • As far as equipment goes, Dave suggests several low-cost options for interviewees to deliver quality audio when they record (especially if you are doing a double-ender) — e.g., the Samson Q2U is an ideal mic (which used to be the AT202x series of mics), as well as the Blue Yeti (as long as it is configured properly and placed in the correct positions for quality audio capture). Now, for myself, there is no mention of the Samson go-mic (which is what I recommended for my co-host to use, and which he has used for 50 podcast episodes as an interviewee or co-host) or other quality mics that are affordable;
  • And finally, Dave suggests what to do for a proper job of planning for audio quality for interviews (and this is merely a way to get the interviewee to obtain the proper equipment for quality, and not a total rejection): “When you say to them, “I’d love to have you on my show, but your audio isn’t currently cutting it. If you want you can order a cheap headset or some earbuds, and we can try again later.” You’re not saying “No.” You’re saying “Not now.” 
  • And then you have the proof of the pudding when you find out why your podcast show may be suffering:  “The bottom line is if you’re wondering why your podcast isn’t growing, it may be that it’s leaving a bad taste in people’s mouth…”

Now, for this podcaster, I have had multiple interviews with many podcasters, celebrities, professionals, etc., during the past 15 years of podcasting. And the worst audio occurred when a guest refused to use a quality mic and agreed to the interview when I had to call him on Skype (remember that old application) and he did the interview from the mic on his smart phone while he was outside. Needless to say, the quality was not good and it would not stand in today’s circles of acceptability. This was an exception, for his partner (also a podcaster and a tech-guy, had wonderful audio when I had interviewed him the year before).

So, unless I know what type of equipment is being used, I would now prefer NOT to conduct an interview over the telephone. I have always preferred to do interviews in person (if possible) with my handy Zoom H2 or H4n or Q3 or even my Zoom H1 that I would hold in my hand, because I could then control the quality of the audio — and I could clean up any wrinkes in post.

But for the newer podcasters or the aspiring interviewers, I would suggest that they should take Dave’s post to heart. Some podcasters have even got to the point of having an extra quality microphone and recorder — and then sending it to the guest, so that quality would not be impaired and all glitches could be corrected in post.

So, we hope that you, as a podcaster, would be very conscientious about the required audio quality in today’s environment and insist that the right mic and the right positions of equipment and settings would be the environment for any future podcast interview recordings with your guests.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson and podcastbusinessjournal.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

558- Suggestions when you have a bad Podcast interview

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the podcast episode content from Dave Jackson, the podcast host of the School of Podcasting show and also the one called Your Podcast Consultant: Nine Minute Lessons on How to Podcast — Small Lessons with Big Value. The theme of an episode that was published earlier is: what are some suggestions and ways to recover and cope with a “bad” podcast episode where the guest or the interview was not good? 

You can find this show episode from the publication date of June 15, 2021.

Dave titles this episode as “What do I do with a bad podcast?”

And since this topic is definitely evergreen, I listened to the 8 minute episode, and I was impressed with the flexibility that Dave discussed about how you can react from bad content or a bad guest (in your opinion, of course) that you had recorded — especially before you post or publish the episode to everyone in the podosphere.

One big reason for having bad content or a bad guest on your podcast on your show is perhaps that you did not do enough research and  preparation — mainly because you did not ensure that your guest is a good fit for your show to provide value to your listeners.

And Dave had very logical and straight-forward answers and suggestions for this — ranging from the re-arranging of content and questions/answers to focusing on the “gems” of the replies from your guest. After all, as Dave reminds us:  this is YOUR show and you control the flow and result of your own content.

One such reply is that you could perhaps turn your interview show into a “narrative” show, where you could be telling a STORY and weave the content from your guest in a narrative style or reporting, etc.

However, Dave did emphasize that the editing in the episode SHOULD NOT change the content or reply to the point where you are putting words in the mouth of the guest or having the guest’s audio “say” things that were not what the guest had really said (you know, such as what the lame-stream media has been doing for the past couple of years in their disinformation and suppression of truth and content in the social media and news streams).


I feel that what Dave had to describe to us is critical, and that this should be consumed by ALL podcasters on a yearly basis, so that our own bias and other lame content will not creep into the value that we intend to provide to our listeners. I would strongly recommend that this episode is an 8-minute gem that should be on every podcaster’s list for mandatory consumption — mainly for keeping an open and professional mind when generating content in the form of guest interviews for the podcast show.

To many, I know that I would be “preaching to the choir” — but this is so abused by the newer podcasters today that it needs to be said and it needs to be repeated. Otherwise, we would invite the lame podcasters and the lame episodes of the lame shows to keep performing their lame actions and delivering lame content, instead of providing good content that will provide VALUE to the listeners.

Thank you for your attention in this short article.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Dave Jackson of “Your Podcast Consultant” podcast show. All rights reserved.

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podcast

557- Podcasting guides and courses from an expert trainer

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the article posted by Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com that tries to give an overview of podcast creation. The title is “Podcast Production Classes: Learn how to record a podcast.”

Ben Krueger

Now, I have known Ben since 2014, and he has delivered a lot of free gems in the form of pdfs and deliverables to those who are aspiring or new podcasters.

This article is one that intrigued me, for there have been so many tutorials on creating a podcast (one of which I, myself, created and published back in 2013-2014 for a couple of courses that I targeted for screencasters called “Podcasting for Screencasters” — and which I had developed jointly with the czar of screencapturevideo.com or formerly, the LearnCamtasia.com guru, Lon Naylor).

Thus, I wanted to see what new themes or topics or techniques would be revealed and presented by Ben at this time.


In reviewing the article, it seems that Ben gave the following modules in his deliverable, which he calls a GUIDE, and he gives a very brief paragraph or two of discussion following each module:

“In this guide, we will be breaking down the following questions:

  • What is the best podcast course?
  • Are podcast production classes necessary?
  • What do I need to record a podcast?
  • What do you need to record a podcast at home?
  • How can I record a podcast for free?
  • How do I record a podcast on my computer?
  • Do podcasts make money?
  • How do I record my first podcast?”

Now, I have been a bit weary of these types of “complete” guides. And this is mainly because I had learned a lot of podcast production from two great resources that are still around since 2005 — Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting and Paul Colligan (the latter who recently does not provide “how to podcast” courses or tutorials or guides any more, but focuses on the monetization strategies that work for business podcasters).


First, I was amazed at a couple of topics that Ben provided, which were the need for a course and whether such training was really needed.

Although each topic is touched upon at a very high level, the questions that are given are the common ones for aspiring or new podcasters. And what this article really does is create a call-to-action from Ben to order a free deliverable — a free pdf or book called “Podcast Strategies: How to create the perfect business podcast.”

And you can order this free deliverable using the link.

Now, for this podcaster, I had ordered the deliverable from Ben a while ago, and for the new and aspiring podcaster, this can serve to help speed up the possibility of creating a podcast show and then put together a strategy for later monetization for the podcaster’s business.

I would strongly encourage those attempting to enter the podosphere as a podcaster to order the free deliverable and contemplate on the steps needed to start on the right path.


Or, just as well, if you plan on going down the route for paid consultation, you may want to join a membership site that delivers tutorials at any stage of your podcasting learning curve from Dave Jackson at his schoolofpodcasting.com site. I had been a member from 2006 to 2008, and this program from Dave allowed me to learn a lot of the details of creating a podcast show and improve it (still today). In fact, I had hired Dave Jackson in the past as my podcast consultant and had started over 8 podcast shows with his hired help.

Regardless of which direction and strategy and deliverables or courses that you may choose for your education to get you started into podcasting, we hope that you can plan for, and launch, and be successful with your podcast show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger and Dave Jackson. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

555- When Podcasting could be last arena of free speech

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a theme of the possibility of censorship in podcasting for the podcaster, as well as the infringement of free speech to those whose passion could be curtailed by not being allowed to publish and distribute their message.

In the area of podcasting, I wanted to expand on the theme that Dave Jackson, podcaster, of the School of Podcasting, spoke about in an earlier episode which was titled “Preserving podcasting as a platform for free speech…”

In this episode, Dave interviews Adam Curry of the No Agenda podcast show (which he publishes with his co-host, John C Dvorak) and talks about podcasting and its future with Dave, and especially how podcasting can be one of the last areas of free speech in this woke-filled culture.

So, in this hour of the published episode from Dave, the topic of free speech is touched upon.  With the censorship of the lame-stream media and the news media so strong in the broadcast area of the media, this was very important to me.

I saw what the cancel culture and censorship results were from “reviews” of podcasting. I got this very early in my career of podcasting, and I quickly had a bad taste in my mouth from a couple of reviews that were just opinions and baseless (and remember, opinions are like “elbows” — everybody has a couple 🙂. And thus, when I re-started the web site and the podcast show publications for this particular show, it did not matter to me that I would not be included or promoted on the Apple platform or any other platform. I did not care for reviews by mindless people who are not like-minded and only want to complain or publish negativity in “reviews.” And this has turned out to be a great result for my podcast show. In fact, this podcast show has grown its audience without any marketing or sales or promotion — it has developed as a good resource for its own audience, and I said to myself “the heck with reviews — they are meaningless, anyway, because the social proof that they claim to provide is not worth the woke-based environment that it brings, and the aggravation of the negative comments are not worth even considering.” And thus, I have not looked back at reviews or subscriptions for these shows that I currently have.

And so, I could understand very well the topic of censorship and cancel culture being discussed by Dave and Adam in the episode on the School of Podcasting.  And, as Adam Curry states: “podcasting is one of the last few openly distributed eco-systems” that promotes free speech and avoids censorship and cancel culture at the whim of the ideologies of management of these firms — at least, on the part of the media host that will provide your episodes to the distribution platform to get your messages to the audience who want it.


Thus, I would heartily suggest that you consume this episode to understand both the free speech element of the eco-system and how the benefits of Podcasting 2.0.

And as for this podcaster, my view is: as long as the media host stays out of the business of cancel culture or censoring my messages (and the signal for this is seeing that a “moderator” is appointed as lord of content to allow only the ideology of management to be published), then podcasting can actually be the last frontier of free speech — and it would not be a platform of brainwashed or woke directions, but that of free speech.

We hope that you enjoy the content of the episode interview that is given in these show notes from Dave’s podcast show, and that you can also understand and appreciate the nature of the eco-system of podcasting as an area of free speech for your message.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

538- The case for podcasters producing their own podcasts

In this episode, we comment on a recent article from Ben Krueger and cashflowpodcasting.com that had the title of “Should you produce your own podcast?”

The argument can go in favor of those aspiring podcasters who want to be their own podcast production house. Although the rise of podcast production companies and facilities is on the rise, sometimes the cost of giving away the responsibility of producing the podcast (including, in some cases, the moderation of the content that can lead to censorship or extreme bias by the radical left employees) may be too high for the independent podcaster — especially when the value at stake is much more than financial, as it could be the loss of control and the threat of being subjected to the woke community of employees that seem to be violating their own management just because of their ideologies. Now, for the older podcasters who have had a good track record in podcast production on their own, this may seem to be a road they will avoid — as they have total CONTROL of the content, the audience and the production processes that they have developed successfully over time.

So, in this article, Ben goes into detail of the points he makes in producing your own podcast.

Ben Krueger

We strongly recommend that you consume this article, for it does give you an idea of the current thinking of some of the newer podcasters who feel that they do not want to do all the WORK associated with content management, content production and follow-up content activities (like marketing, promotion, etc.).

The main points that are delivered by Ben are the following:

  • The cost of podcast production;
  • How much money can you make by producing your own podcast?
  • The profitability of podcasting — some key thoughts; and, oh, by the way, you may want to reference a recent book by 16-year podcaster and coach Davd Jackson called Profit from your podcast)
  • Examples of some podcast platforms and making money (in one case, he uses the Anchor example);
  • Can you make a podcast by yourself?
  • Do podcast guests get paid? (Ben advises against this at the outset of starting your own podcast — and he tells why)

And also, in this article, Ben delivers a link to his own program where he encourages people to become podcasters at Start a Podcast. He certainly can promote his program and benefit from the aspiring podcaster who wishes to be his own podcaster.

And there is nothing wrong with that. I have known Ben since 2014 and have followed his blog at cashflowpodcasting.com and have seen him deliver many gems in podcasting in the form of free pdf documents to podcasters.

As Ben summarizes in his post, he focuses on the key element of starting your own podcast, owning it, continuing it and developing it into a successful show:  “Nothing is stopping you from making a podcast by yourself and publishing it across all the various streaming platforms. The question is, do you have the time?”

However, Ben assumes that you probably will be desiring to deal with the content and focus on audience and promotion elements of your show than the day-to-day tasks needed for production (both pre-production and post-production from the audio recording). So he states that “With more production services on the market than ever before, there has never been a better time to start looking for a podcast production partner. From offering basic editing services to a comprehensive end-to-end solution, you can find a partner that will meet your requirements.”

So we hope that if you are an aspiring podcaster, you create for yourself a cost-benefit analysis where you can look at the costs (and most of them not being financial) of creating, recording, editing, posting, publishing, promoting, marketing, controlling, selling and monetizing your business podcasts by yourself vs the costs and benefits of delegating those tasks (or most of them) to a third party podcast production house.

Then you can successfully move into the area of either being a true independent professional podcaster or farm it out to a third party (with whom you may later disagree with their practices, their ideologies, or potential bias that may cause you irreparable damage to your podcast and your brand and your business).

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger. All rights reserved.