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podcast

558- Suggestions when you have a bad Podcast interview

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the podcast episode content from Dave Jackson, the podcast host of the School of Podcasting show and also the one called Your Podcast Consultant: Nine Minute Lessons on How to Podcast — Small Lessons with Big Value. The theme of an episode that was published earlier is: what are some suggestions and ways to recover and cope with a “bad” podcast episode where the guest or the interview was not good? 

You can find this show episode from the publication date of June 15, 2021.

Dave titles this episode as “What do I do with a bad podcast?”

And since this topic is definitely evergreen, I listened to the 8 minute episode, and I was impressed with the flexibility that Dave discussed about how you can react from bad content or a bad guest (in your opinion, of course) that you had recorded — especially before you post or publish the episode to everyone in the podosphere.

One big reason for having bad content or a bad guest on your podcast on your show is perhaps that you did not do enough research and  preparation — mainly because you did not ensure that your guest is a good fit for your show to provide value to your listeners.

And Dave had very logical and straight-forward answers and suggestions for this — ranging from the re-arranging of content and questions/answers to focusing on the “gems” of the replies from your guest. After all, as Dave reminds us:  this is YOUR show and you control the flow and result of your own content.

One such reply is that you could perhaps turn your interview show into a “narrative” show, where you could be telling a STORY and weave the content from your guest in a narrative style or reporting, etc.

However, Dave did emphasize that the editing in the episode SHOULD NOT change the content or reply to the point where you are putting words in the mouth of the guest or having the guest’s audio “say” things that were not what the guest had really said (you know, such as what the lame-stream media has been doing for the past couple of years in their disinformation and suppression of truth and content in the social media and news streams).


I feel that what Dave had to describe to us is critical, and that this should be consumed by ALL podcasters on a yearly basis, so that our own bias and other lame content will not creep into the value that we intend to provide to our listeners. I would strongly recommend that this episode is an 8-minute gem that should be on every podcaster’s list for mandatory consumption — mainly for keeping an open and professional mind when generating content in the form of guest interviews for the podcast show.

To many, I know that I would be “preaching to the choir” — but this is so abused by the newer podcasters today that it needs to be said and it needs to be repeated. Otherwise, we would invite the lame podcasters and the lame episodes of the lame shows to keep performing their lame actions and delivering lame content, instead of providing good content that will provide VALUE to the listeners.

Thank you for your attention in this short article.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Dave Jackson of “Your Podcast Consultant” podcast show. All rights reserved.

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podcast

557- Podcasting guides and courses from an expert trainer

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the article posted by Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com that tries to give an overview of podcast creation. The title is “Podcast Production Classes: Learn how to record a podcast.”

Ben Krueger

Now, I have known Ben since 2014, and he has delivered a lot of free gems in the form of pdfs and deliverables to those who are aspiring or new podcasters.

This article is one that intrigued me, for there have been so many tutorials on creating a podcast (one of which I, myself, created and published back in 2013-2014 for a couple of courses that I targeted for screencasters called “Podcasting for Screencasters” — and which I had developed jointly with the czar of screencapturevideo.com or formerly, the LearnCamtasia.com guru, Lon Naylor).

Thus, I wanted to see what new themes or topics or techniques would be revealed and presented by Ben at this time.


In reviewing the article, it seems that Ben gave the following modules in his deliverable, which he calls a GUIDE, and he gives a very brief paragraph or two of discussion following each module:

“In this guide, we will be breaking down the following questions:

  • What is the best podcast course?
  • Are podcast production classes necessary?
  • What do I need to record a podcast?
  • What do you need to record a podcast at home?
  • How can I record a podcast for free?
  • How do I record a podcast on my computer?
  • Do podcasts make money?
  • How do I record my first podcast?”

Now, I have been a bit weary of these types of “complete” guides. And this is mainly because I had learned a lot of podcast production from two great resources that are still around since 2005 — Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting and Paul Colligan (the latter who recently does not provide “how to podcast” courses or tutorials or guides any more, but focuses on the monetization strategies that work for business podcasters).


First, I was amazed at a couple of topics that Ben provided, which were the need for a course and whether such training was really needed.

Although each topic is touched upon at a very high level, the questions that are given are the common ones for aspiring or new podcasters. And what this article really does is create a call-to-action from Ben to order a free deliverable — a free pdf or book called “Podcast Strategies: How to create the perfect business podcast.”

And you can order this free deliverable using the link.

Now, for this podcaster, I had ordered the deliverable from Ben a while ago, and for the new and aspiring podcaster, this can serve to help speed up the possibility of creating a podcast show and then put together a strategy for later monetization for the podcaster’s business.

I would strongly encourage those attempting to enter the podosphere as a podcaster to order the free deliverable and contemplate on the steps needed to start on the right path.


Or, just as well, if you plan on going down the route for paid consultation, you may want to join a membership site that delivers tutorials at any stage of your podcasting learning curve from Dave Jackson at his schoolofpodcasting.com site. I had been a member from 2006 to 2008, and this program from Dave allowed me to learn a lot of the details of creating a podcast show and improve it (still today). In fact, I had hired Dave Jackson in the past as my podcast consultant and had started over 8 podcast shows with his hired help.

Regardless of which direction and strategy and deliverables or courses that you may choose for your education to get you started into podcasting, we hope that you can plan for, and launch, and be successful with your podcast show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger and Dave Jackson. All rights reserved.

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podcast

555- When Podcasting could be last arena of free speech

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a theme of the possibility of censorship in podcasting for the podcaster, as well as the infringement of free speech to those whose passion could be curtailed by not being allowed to publish and distribute their message.

In the area of podcasting, I wanted to expand on the theme that Dave Jackson, podcaster, of the School of Podcasting, spoke about in an earlier episode which was titled “Preserving podcasting as a platform for free speech…”

In this episode, Dave interviews Adam Curry of the No Agenda podcast show (which he publishes with his co-host, John C Dvorak) and talks about podcasting and its future with Dave, and especially how podcasting can be one of the last areas of free speech in this woke-filled culture.

So, in this hour of the published episode from Dave, the topic of free speech is touched upon.  With the censorship of the lame-stream media and the news media so strong in the broadcast area of the media, this was very important to me.

I saw what the cancel culture and censorship results were from “reviews” of podcasting. I got this very early in my career of podcasting, and I quickly had a bad taste in my mouth from a couple of reviews that were just opinions and baseless (and remember, opinions are like “elbows” — everybody has a couple 🙂. And thus, when I re-started the web site and the podcast show publications for this particular show, it did not matter to me that I would not be included or promoted on the Apple platform or any other platform. I did not care for reviews by mindless people who are not like-minded and only want to complain or publish negativity in “reviews.” And this has turned out to be a great result for my podcast show. In fact, this podcast show has grown its audience without any marketing or sales or promotion — it has developed as a good resource for its own audience, and I said to myself “the heck with reviews — they are meaningless, anyway, because the social proof that they claim to provide is not worth the woke-based environment that it brings, and the aggravation of the negative comments are not worth even considering.” And thus, I have not looked back at reviews or subscriptions for these shows that I currently have.

And so, I could understand very well the topic of censorship and cancel culture being discussed by Dave and Adam in the episode on the School of Podcasting.  And, as Adam Curry states: “podcasting is one of the last few openly distributed eco-systems” that promotes free speech and avoids censorship and cancel culture at the whim of the ideologies of management of these firms — at least, on the part of the media host that will provide your episodes to the distribution platform to get your messages to the audience who want it.


Thus, I would heartily suggest that you consume this episode to understand both the free speech element of the eco-system and how the benefits of Podcasting 2.0.

And as for this podcaster, my view is: as long as the media host stays out of the business of cancel culture or censoring my messages (and the signal for this is seeing that a “moderator” is appointed as lord of content to allow only the ideology of management to be published), then podcasting can actually be the last frontier of free speech — and it would not be a platform of brainwashed or woke directions, but that of free speech.

We hope that you enjoy the content of the episode interview that is given in these show notes from Dave’s podcast show, and that you can also understand and appreciate the nature of the eco-system of podcasting as an area of free speech for your message.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

538- The case for podcasters producing their own podcasts

In this episode, we comment on a recent article from Ben Krueger and cashflowpodcasting.com that had the title of “Should you produce your own podcast?”

The argument can go in favor of those aspiring podcasters who want to be their own podcast production house. Although the rise of podcast production companies and facilities is on the rise, sometimes the cost of giving away the responsibility of producing the podcast (including, in some cases, the moderation of the content that can lead to censorship or extreme bias by the radical left employees) may be too high for the independent podcaster — especially when the value at stake is much more than financial, as it could be the loss of control and the threat of being subjected to the woke community of employees that seem to be violating their own management just because of their ideologies. Now, for the older podcasters who have had a good track record in podcast production on their own, this may seem to be a road they will avoid — as they have total CONTROL of the content, the audience and the production processes that they have developed successfully over time.

So, in this article, Ben goes into detail of the points he makes in producing your own podcast.

Ben Krueger

We strongly recommend that you consume this article, for it does give you an idea of the current thinking of some of the newer podcasters who feel that they do not want to do all the WORK associated with content management, content production and follow-up content activities (like marketing, promotion, etc.).

The main points that are delivered by Ben are the following:

  • The cost of podcast production;
  • How much money can you make by producing your own podcast?
  • The profitability of podcasting — some key thoughts; and, oh, by the way, you may want to reference a recent book by 16-year podcaster and coach Davd Jackson called Profit from your podcast)
  • Examples of some podcast platforms and making money (in one case, he uses the Anchor example);
  • Can you make a podcast by yourself?
  • Do podcast guests get paid? (Ben advises against this at the outset of starting your own podcast — and he tells why)

And also, in this article, Ben delivers a link to his own program where he encourages people to become podcasters at Start a Podcast. He certainly can promote his program and benefit from the aspiring podcaster who wishes to be his own podcaster.

And there is nothing wrong with that. I have known Ben since 2014 and have followed his blog at cashflowpodcasting.com and have seen him deliver many gems in podcasting in the form of free pdf documents to podcasters.

As Ben summarizes in his post, he focuses on the key element of starting your own podcast, owning it, continuing it and developing it into a successful show:  “Nothing is stopping you from making a podcast by yourself and publishing it across all the various streaming platforms. The question is, do you have the time?”

However, Ben assumes that you probably will be desiring to deal with the content and focus on audience and promotion elements of your show than the day-to-day tasks needed for production (both pre-production and post-production from the audio recording). So he states that “With more production services on the market than ever before, there has never been a better time to start looking for a podcast production partner. From offering basic editing services to a comprehensive end-to-end solution, you can find a partner that will meet your requirements.”

So we hope that if you are an aspiring podcaster, you create for yourself a cost-benefit analysis where you can look at the costs (and most of them not being financial) of creating, recording, editing, posting, publishing, promoting, marketing, controlling, selling and monetizing your business podcasts by yourself vs the costs and benefits of delegating those tasks (or most of them) to a third party podcast production house.

Then you can successfully move into the area of either being a true independent professional podcaster or farm it out to a third party (with whom you may later disagree with their practices, their ideologies, or potential bias that may cause you irreparable damage to your podcast and your brand and your business).

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger. All rights reserved.

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podcast

534- Searching for the truth in Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we reflect on a podcast episode delivered on 19April2021 by podcaster Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting. The title of the episode was “Podcasting Can Give Your Audience Something They Are Dying To Hear: The Truth”.

For a few brief moments, I delivered my own opinion on how podcasting can be the last medium where you can hear both sides of the story and seek the truth, so that you can then form your own viewpoint and opinion from your own critical thinking and freedom.

However, you have to find shows that do give both sides of the story and are not restricted to spilling out a narrative with one bias and political ideology that condemns anyone who doesn’t follow it to the cancel culture punishment.

So, in this short episode, I applaud Dave for delivering this message to us, and I refer to episode 533 of this podcastreporter.com series (coming in the near future) that deals with the idea that podcasting can be a vehicle to tell the truth and your own story and give out your message without being censored (as are all the other platforms in the social media, lame-stream media and politicians).

We hope that you will also reflect on Dave’s words, as well as this episode, and that you (as a podcaster) will continue an uncensored march to deliver your message without fear, intimidation or cancel culture punishment.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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Uncategorized

BONUS- 475A-Reverse benefit of podcasting — how your sphere of influence can grow YOU

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver some thoughts from an old benefit of starting a podcast. Initially, you were told by such pundits in podcasting like Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting that podcasts can help you grow your sphere of influence (as well as grow your audience).

Well, after some thought, I have a case study that proves to new and aspiring podcasters, that podcasting can help your sphere of influence to GROW YOU.

Case study is a podcast show that has been around since 2014 — The 2030 Podcast. And, as a short story, this podcast had absolutely NO promotion or marketing or sales calls-to-action. In fact, there was not even a SUBSCRIBE button on the web page of its latest episode, or on the web pages of its prior episodes.

This podcast show grew when its episodes were picked up anonymously by a current podcast show, Grumpy Old Bens, by one of the co-hosts (Sir Ryan Bemrose) and included on a 24-hour online stream (noagendastream.com). It was played as a published episode in which the producing managers found value in what was said and knew that the current audience of noagendastream.com would find it as having great VALUE to the current stream audience.

Now, I myself, as a subscriber to the Grumpy Old Bens show, had heard during various hours of this 24-hour stream my episodes being played and broadcast on the stream. What a wonderful surprise it was to me — and I quickly informed my co-host, Matt Cox of the podcast show called Brunch with the Brits, of that activity. He was surprised and glad of that activity.

But again, there was NO marketing, no promotion, no sales, no bumpers, etc. of any sort to try and increase our audience, and thus to GROW OUR INFLUENCE.

The results: well, since that time, over several months, our download numbers have grown — sometimes to 3,000 downloads per week per episode or more. And all this due to like-minded listeners receiving the stream and hearing our podcast show episodes. And they, then have downloaded the episodes and listened to them.

So, as Dave Jackson said in a recent podcast episode of his School of Podcasting show:  “podcasting can help grow your sphere of influence…”

And now, we have seen that, in our experience, podcasting can help your sphere of influence grow the PODCASTER and the SHOW.

As you will hear in this audio episode, we have included a recent small clip from a show, Grumpy Old Bens, that describes the VALUE of our 2030podcast.com show, in which the co-hosts actually promote the show to their fan base of listeners (that is, to their own sphere of influence).

 

So, as you can see, there is no absolute rule that your podcast must have a plan to drive listeners and increase your audience numbers by growing your sphere of influence. There is always a situation that defies conventional wisdom by having your sphere of influence grow YOU.

We hope that this episode could give you another proven method for you, as an aspiring or new podcaster, to improve the results of your podcast show and episodes. And we wish for you the best in podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Grumpy Old Bens. All rights reserved.

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podcast

474- Argument about “just start” a Podcast — just DO NOT do it

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we present the argument from Ben Krueger that the common advice given to “just start” may be the wrong advice for having a successful podcast show. After we see why he says what he does, we bring in my own personal opinion from my own history when I “just got started” into podcasting. And we end up with a thought leader in the Podosphere, Paul Colligan of The Podcast Report show who is a mentor himself and helps aspiring podcasters to be prepared to monetize their shows and business podcasts.


First, let us see what Ben Krueger had stated in his email:

“Just get started!”

That’s the advice I hear all the time given to budding podcasters.


Yes, it’s true that taking action is better than getting stuck in the planning process. But I still think it gets more credit than it deserves.

Why?

First, “just get started” puts you at a huge disadvantage.

These days, everyone can launch their own show. Sometimes with a budget as low as $200.

So if you start a podcast without a clear attack plan…

And you’re just doing it for the sake of “getting your feet wet”…

You end up producing a messy, low-quality show that won’t stand out in the crowded podcasting world.

Second, every episode is important.

“Just get started” may get you published quickly…but it won’t get you recommended.

If your podcast doesn’t leave a good impression, it’ll probably end up in a prospect’s “do not listen” list.

Now, I’m not saying this to discourage you from producing your show.

But the reality is, podcasting isn’t for everyone!

And by doing the upfront work of planning, you’ll save time and potential heartaches in the future.

That’s why I want to invite you to a free consultation call, so we can see if podcasting is the right strategy for your business.”

As you will hear in this brief episode, I myself had “just started” my own podcast show in 2006, but I had the help of tools and courses that were available to me:

  • The School of Podcasting was a program from Dave Jackson that helped me to learn how to prepare a good show and episodes;
  • I took the course from Jason Van Orden about Learn How to Podcast (no longer available) online and understood the rudimentary steps of producing a podcast episode — especially since there were almost no tools available at the time in the podosphere;
  • I leaned from the books available — from Podcasting for Dummies to the book by Todd Cochrane and another from Mr. Geohegen and others.

But thought leaders like Paul Colligan of The Podcast Report now mentors others and consults with them to prepare a podcast that will have business success for monetization.

And I think that the 2 groups of podcasters — one that podcasts as a hobby or for passion, and the other that podcasts for business with monetization in mind — are what podcasters have to determine when they are sprayed with the words “just get started” by many of the podcasting instructors today.

For you, as a podcaster, which is the path you will follow? And which is the mentorship program that you will pursue and follow if you are serious about becoming a professional podcaster who will successfully monetize the podcast within your business?

And this email letter gives food for thought to the aspiring podcaster for a decision that should be made today.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger. All rights reserved.

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podcast

472- Podcasting opportunity lost — a case study

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a case study (in which I was involved) that was a good potential for creating a needed podcast show, but was lost in the “muck and mire” of the podosphere in its early stages.

This involves the idea of a potential startup podcast that could support a growing audience of entrepreneurs — and it was called Niche-Net (TM) (i.e., The National Internet Community of Hispanic Entrepreneurs Network).

This all started in the year 1994 — over a decade before the podosphere emerged. I was in the midst of starting my own entrepreneur venture, and it was called Niche-Net. This community was supposed to help the Hispanic community get into the entrepreneurial ventures for their own small businesses. At the time, the web site and the offers and offerings and products were varied, and a small outreach only included building web sites for that targeted community.

However, as with many startups, the venture only lasted a few years and then was gone. But what was interesting is that it did not rise up again when I got into the podosphere and started podcasts.

At that latest time, in 2005 and 2006, I could have easily started a podcast that probably would have been very successful in that market with that type of audience. But I did not. And I now know that I did blow the opportunity for a potential success of a show, as well as the successful promotion of offers, offerings, products and services for that community — even to the point of creating a meetup group and membership site based on the podcast show, which would have been called the Niche-Net podcast show.

So my case study encompasses the following aspects for discussion:

  • when do you know a good idea can develop into something later on for “the next big thing”?
  • what should you do to keep the idea captured until the right time?
  • what kind of mental ideas and plans and visions can you document, so that later on they can be brought into fruition with the proper new media environment or business environment?

My opinion and suggestions for these questions are the following:

When you have the idea for this new media or business idea, you should document every aspect of your vision — either in a business plan, or a feasibility plan, or an outline or detailed plan (to the extreme of a project management work-breakdown-schedule).

This documented plan should then be placed in a suspense file (either hardcopy or electronic), where you review the plan every quarter of the year and check to see if there are any new technologies or developments in which the plan can be resurrected and be incorporated into a road for a successful podcast or venture. In my case study, the original Niche-Net idea was for internet web pages (which were relatively new services for entrepreneurs in 1994) — but in 2005, the idea could have been resurrected for creating a podcast show with other means of monetization waiting to be discovered and implemented in membership sites, offers, offerings, products, services, etc., from the podcast show and its episodes and advertising.

And finally, the more detailed a feasibility plan is, the better off you may be to convert the plan into a more complete layout for a podcast show, with individual episodes that can address advertising, monetization, audience growth and opportunities for creating revenue streams of various types (e.g., from donations, tip-jars, advertising, book deals, audio sales of episodes, DVD sales of complete seasons or shows, etc.). In fact, the two resources that come to my mind are the books from Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting that started in 2010 and even today — the books of More Podcast Money and Profit from Your Podcast.

And, of course, there are many more ideas and opportunities for success (in many ways of defining “success” in addition to financial results) — including notoriety in the old “New and Noteworthy,” as well as speaking engagements, book deals, bloggingn, television and video shows and appearances, etc.


And so what are my lessons learned?

Well, I would suggest to start early and document your dreams. The better your details would determine the better your descriptions for making your dream into a reality once the environment appears to mold your original dream into a viable opportunity solution — especially for fame, notoriety, audience growth, acceptance or monetization.

With the documented dream in a suspense file, a review in the form of envisioning if your dream can fit into the new environment would be a benefit that can spark a new idea — and that new idea of a fit into the new market could spawn a unique or different way of improving the opportunity for a solution or another way of serving a new audience.

And then, from the review of the documented dream in your suspense file, you can then put together a plan for implementing the dream in terms of time, money, effort and possible returns (even with great feedback from trusted advisors — who may end up being your financial backers, supporters, investors, etc.). And if you have the resources to finance the dream yourself as a startup or as a podcast that can grow for a minimal investment, then you have the start to what could be a “dream come true” that will provide VALUE for your customers and listeners, as well as REWARDS for yourself in more than just financial ways.

This is a case study which I use now as a lesson learned — and it has created for me a BEST PRACTICES method of using creativity and matching it with opportunity and planning to have a possibility of going for success in podcasting and business. And who knows? If I had used my own practices stated here, then possibly the Niche-Net membership site and podcast environment might have been a very successful venture for myself at this time.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

454- Quantifying money to be made by podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the topic of how much money you can make by podcasting.

As you will hear in this audio episode, the theme was taken from a recent episode and post from buzzsprout.com/blog.

Ideas for adding additional streams for generating revenue are delivered. In addition, this specific podcast series, PodcastReporter.com, has also described (in earlier episodes) different methods of creating revenue streams from your podcasting within your business.

One aspect that demands attention in this audio episode is that downloads are not the only indication of success for generating revenue. In fact, there are many ways to make money — and they are given in the recently published book from Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting called “Profit from your Podcast.”

We hope that you can be successful in monetizing podcasts and go toward delivering value to your listeners, so that you can also join the club of 6-figure professional podcasters.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and buzzsprout.com/blog. All rights reserved.

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podcast

451A- BONUS – First look at the bonus resource from Dave Jackson

In this episode of the Podcast Reporter, we take a first look into the bonus deliverable that was sent to those who purchased a book from Dave Jackson called Profit from Your Podcast.

 As you may well know, I did purchase the book from Dave Jackson, and I recently received an email from him which thanked me for my purchase of his book, along with a link and instructions for reaching the bonus content which he specified in his book.

I decided to sign up for the bonus content and I went to the link and became a member of his bonus area. After logging on, I did a quick recon of the site and what Dave had deliveed.

It seemed to me that he was using a template for a mastermind group. It was also called “More podcast money” in some spots later in the site. Now, this More Podcast Money was the name of his previous book (which this one obviously updated), and he had a free podcast with the same name that originally dealt with monetizing your podcast.

So I went through and gave my own opinion of the site and what it could propose to podcasters (and I did this in a very informal “stream of consciousness” method — right, nothing sophisticated or professionally planned).

So, in this audio episode, after my walk-through, I do give a final perspective from only my viewpoint of the book and the value it could provide to new podcasters, aspiring podcasters, or veteran podcasters.


My own final perspective was that this book could be a good resource for both aspiring podcasters and new podcasters. But myself, as a veteran podcaster, would be reluctant to see the value of the site until more participation and sharing occurs. As was stated in the audio episode, Paul Colligan (at  paulcolligan.com ) once tried to start Podcaster Space (on the heels of the 2006 MySpace.com craze), but it also required group participation — and so, I found myself to be the only one for a while in the site. And because of the lack of participation from others, the site failed.

And so, I, a veteran podcaster, will come back and see if the participation does exist, and then I can see if there is value in the content or not.

In the meantime, I thank Dave for going the extra mile to create this site (like a mastermind group site) and encourage those podcasters who want to become profitable in monetization to use it and participate.

With my gratitude to Dave Jackson, my old consultant from 2006, I thank him.

And so, for this podcaster, I would like to thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c), Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson and Profit from your Podcast. All rights reserved.