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podcast

538- The case for podcasters producing their own podcasts

In this episode, we comment on a recent article from Ben Krueger and cashflowpodcasting.com that had the title of “Should you produce your own podcast?”

The argument can go in favor of those aspiring podcasters who want to be their own podcast production house. Although the rise of podcast production companies and facilities is on the rise, sometimes the cost of giving away the responsibility of producing the podcast (including, in some cases, the moderation of the content that can lead to censorship or extreme bias by the radical left employees) may be too high for the independent podcaster — especially when the value at stake is much more than financial, as it could be the loss of control and the threat of being subjected to the woke community of employees that seem to be violating their own management just because of their ideologies. Now, for the older podcasters who have had a good track record in podcast production on their own, this may seem to be a road they will avoid — as they have total CONTROL of the content, the audience and the production processes that they have developed successfully over time.

So, in this article, Ben goes into detail of the points he makes in producing your own podcast.

Ben Krueger

We strongly recommend that you consume this article, for it does give you an idea of the current thinking of some of the newer podcasters who feel that they do not want to do all the WORK associated with content management, content production and follow-up content activities (like marketing, promotion, etc.).

The main points that are delivered by Ben are the following:

  • The cost of podcast production;
  • How much money can you make by producing your own podcast?
  • The profitability of podcasting — some key thoughts; and, oh, by the way, you may want to reference a recent book by 16-year podcaster and coach Davd Jackson called Profit from your podcast)
  • Examples of some podcast platforms and making money (in one case, he uses the Anchor example);
  • Can you make a podcast by yourself?
  • Do podcast guests get paid? (Ben advises against this at the outset of starting your own podcast — and he tells why)

And also, in this article, Ben delivers a link to his own program where he encourages people to become podcasters at Start a Podcast. He certainly can promote his program and benefit from the aspiring podcaster who wishes to be his own podcaster.

And there is nothing wrong with that. I have known Ben since 2014 and have followed his blog at cashflowpodcasting.com and have seen him deliver many gems in podcasting in the form of free pdf documents to podcasters.

As Ben summarizes in his post, he focuses on the key element of starting your own podcast, owning it, continuing it and developing it into a successful show:  “Nothing is stopping you from making a podcast by yourself and publishing it across all the various streaming platforms. The question is, do you have the time?”

However, Ben assumes that you probably will be desiring to deal with the content and focus on audience and promotion elements of your show than the day-to-day tasks needed for production (both pre-production and post-production from the audio recording). So he states that “With more production services on the market than ever before, there has never been a better time to start looking for a podcast production partner. From offering basic editing services to a comprehensive end-to-end solution, you can find a partner that will meet your requirements.”

So we hope that if you are an aspiring podcaster, you create for yourself a cost-benefit analysis where you can look at the costs (and most of them not being financial) of creating, recording, editing, posting, publishing, promoting, marketing, controlling, selling and monetizing your business podcasts by yourself vs the costs and benefits of delegating those tasks (or most of them) to a third party podcast production house.

Then you can successfully move into the area of either being a true independent professional podcaster or farm it out to a third party (with whom you may later disagree with their practices, their ideologies, or potential bias that may cause you irreparable damage to your podcast and your brand and your business).

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger. All rights reserved.

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podcast

472- Podcasting opportunity lost — a case study

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a case study (in which I was involved) that was a good potential for creating a needed podcast show, but was lost in the “muck and mire” of the podosphere in its early stages.

This involves the idea of a potential startup podcast that could support a growing audience of entrepreneurs — and it was called Niche-Net (TM) (i.e., The National Internet Community of Hispanic Entrepreneurs Network).

This all started in the year 1994 — over a decade before the podosphere emerged. I was in the midst of starting my own entrepreneur venture, and it was called Niche-Net. This community was supposed to help the Hispanic community get into the entrepreneurial ventures for their own small businesses. At the time, the web site and the offers and offerings and products were varied, and a small outreach only included building web sites for that targeted community.

However, as with many startups, the venture only lasted a few years and then was gone. But what was interesting is that it did not rise up again when I got into the podosphere and started podcasts.

At that latest time, in 2005 and 2006, I could have easily started a podcast that probably would have been very successful in that market with that type of audience. But I did not. And I now know that I did blow the opportunity for a potential success of a show, as well as the successful promotion of offers, offerings, products and services for that community — even to the point of creating a meetup group and membership site based on the podcast show, which would have been called the Niche-Net podcast show.

So my case study encompasses the following aspects for discussion:

  • when do you know a good idea can develop into something later on for “the next big thing”?
  • what should you do to keep the idea captured until the right time?
  • what kind of mental ideas and plans and visions can you document, so that later on they can be brought into fruition with the proper new media environment or business environment?

My opinion and suggestions for these questions are the following:

When you have the idea for this new media or business idea, you should document every aspect of your vision — either in a business plan, or a feasibility plan, or an outline or detailed plan (to the extreme of a project management work-breakdown-schedule).

This documented plan should then be placed in a suspense file (either hardcopy or electronic), where you review the plan every quarter of the year and check to see if there are any new technologies or developments in which the plan can be resurrected and be incorporated into a road for a successful podcast or venture. In my case study, the original Niche-Net idea was for internet web pages (which were relatively new services for entrepreneurs in 1994) — but in 2005, the idea could have been resurrected for creating a podcast show with other means of monetization waiting to be discovered and implemented in membership sites, offers, offerings, products, services, etc., from the podcast show and its episodes and advertising.

And finally, the more detailed a feasibility plan is, the better off you may be to convert the plan into a more complete layout for a podcast show, with individual episodes that can address advertising, monetization, audience growth and opportunities for creating revenue streams of various types (e.g., from donations, tip-jars, advertising, book deals, audio sales of episodes, DVD sales of complete seasons or shows, etc.). In fact, the two resources that come to my mind are the books from Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting that started in 2010 and even today — the books of More Podcast Money and Profit from Your Podcast.

And, of course, there are many more ideas and opportunities for success (in many ways of defining “success” in addition to financial results) — including notoriety in the old “New and Noteworthy,” as well as speaking engagements, book deals, bloggingn, television and video shows and appearances, etc.


And so what are my lessons learned?

Well, I would suggest to start early and document your dreams. The better your details would determine the better your descriptions for making your dream into a reality once the environment appears to mold your original dream into a viable opportunity solution — especially for fame, notoriety, audience growth, acceptance or monetization.

With the documented dream in a suspense file, a review in the form of envisioning if your dream can fit into the new environment would be a benefit that can spark a new idea — and that new idea of a fit into the new market could spawn a unique or different way of improving the opportunity for a solution or another way of serving a new audience.

And then, from the review of the documented dream in your suspense file, you can then put together a plan for implementing the dream in terms of time, money, effort and possible returns (even with great feedback from trusted advisors — who may end up being your financial backers, supporters, investors, etc.). And if you have the resources to finance the dream yourself as a startup or as a podcast that can grow for a minimal investment, then you have the start to what could be a “dream come true” that will provide VALUE for your customers and listeners, as well as REWARDS for yourself in more than just financial ways.

This is a case study which I use now as a lesson learned — and it has created for me a BEST PRACTICES method of using creativity and matching it with opportunity and planning to have a possibility of going for success in podcasting and business. And who knows? If I had used my own practices stated here, then possibly the Niche-Net membership site and podcast environment might have been a very successful venture for myself at this time.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

454- Quantifying money to be made by podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the topic of how much money you can make by podcasting.

As you will hear in this audio episode, the theme was taken from a recent episode and post from buzzsprout.com/blog.

Ideas for adding additional streams for generating revenue are delivered. In addition, this specific podcast series, PodcastReporter.com, has also described (in earlier episodes) different methods of creating revenue streams from your podcasting within your business.

One aspect that demands attention in this audio episode is that downloads are not the only indication of success for generating revenue. In fact, there are many ways to make money — and they are given in the recently published book from Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting called “Profit from your Podcast.”

We hope that you can be successful in monetizing podcasts and go toward delivering value to your listeners, so that you can also join the club of 6-figure professional podcasters.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and buzzsprout.com/blog. All rights reserved.

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podcast

447- Strategies to help you when podcasting is no longer fun

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we revisit the topic of helping the podcaster get over any negative feelings that may creep up for podcasting when the passion and thrill is gone for you.

In this repurposed episode, we hope to give you tips and ideas to create strategies and help you to avoid the negative feelings that can result from the following:

  • Boredom,
  • burnout,
  • overwork,
  • lack of socialization with other podcasters,
  • lack of content (because you may have exhausted your content and cannot spawn new episodes from newer ideas), etc.
  • competition that has overtaken your show;
  • too much repetition in your workflow;
  • inability to participate in podcast meetups or podcamps or podcast conferences;
  • you feel attracted more to social media instead of podcasting;
  • you may feel that you have “grown out” of podcasting;
  • health problems that make you lose energy or ability to engage in podcasting in the way you did when you first started;
  • and other reasons that are mentioned in this episode.

I, myself, have felt down in certain times. And I give you a number of strategies that can help you get out of your slump of negativity. These did work for me.

In fact, there are GROWTH strategies that may work for you — for example, starting a podcast membership site (such as the one Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show created called Podcasters Society), or even starting or participating in a podcast network.

And, of course, there is always the direction of monetizing your podcast. You can refer to Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting show in his free and earlier book, More Podcast Money (or the updated book called Profit from your Podcast).

I hope that some of these strategies that have worked for me as a podcaster can also help you during the times when you may begin to feel that “the thrill is gone” from podcasting.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

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podcast

446- Case study review — how Evo Terra creates his podcast

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the recent article in the podnews.net newsletter that reviews how Evo Terra creates and produces his podcast show of PodcastPontifications.com.

For any podcaster that has known Evo, this would seem like a very interesting story. As I have known Evo since 2007 when I met him in person at a Podcamp conference in Arizona, I considered this of great value. For he has been a master podcaster, as well as an author who wrote several of the first books on podcasting in 2005 and 2007 (i.e., Podcasting for Dummies and Expert podcasting practices for Dummies).


Why this article in the podnews.net newsletter? Well, I guess that Evo got tired of people asking him why he spends 3.5 hours per episode and 4 episodes per week for almost 350 episodes to do his show — and that begs the question of the description of his workflow. So I guess he decided to publish the answer and point people to the article as a reply.

Very much like the situation with Dave Jackson of the School of Podcasting show, Dave constantly had to explain and answer the question of how someone can make money from podcasting. And so what did Dave do? He wrote a book, More Podcast Money (which is being updated with a new book, Profit from Your Podcast). And now, Dave can point to the book as a detailed reply once and for all.


Now, for aspiring or new podcasters who may ask Evo the same question (possibly in a webinar or a conference or a presentation), this article from Evo presents itself as a CASE STUDY.

In it, Evo describes the following details of his planning, his equipment, his recording, his production, his publishing — and then he goes into the details of WHY he takes so long (21 times the length of each episode) for final production:

  • Sound Conditioning:  these details describe how his environment for recording is prepared for recording;
  • Microphone: Shure SM7B mounted on a VIVO swingarm-mount
  • Audio Interface: Zoom H6, a portable recorder that has a lot of features and functions for recording either in a studio setting or the outdoors;
  • Computer: Mac Mini, which is my dedicated studio computer. 
  • Digital Audio Workstation or DAW:
  • Camera:  None, as his show of Podcast Pontifications is not a video podcast. But yes, there is a video version. 
  • Media Hosting Company: Captivate.fm, of which I sit on the Advisory Board. (Disclosure – so does Podnews’s Editor).
  • Website: PodcastPontifications.com is managed via and hosted by Webfow
  • Other Software: as described.
  • Pre-production:  And he delivers a bulleted list in this case study of what a typical schedule is like for him in the preparation and production tasks.
  • Creating a title and finalizing imagery;
  • Creating the “script” for the show
  • Production and live streaming: recording and creating the mp3 file;
  • Exporting the mp3 file to Descript for a full transcription.
  • The Writing and written editing: post-production
  • Publishing & Distribution: this can include scheduling and publishing the video and posting it to appropriate sites and web pages, as well as finalizing the ID3 tags.
  • Final syndication.

Now, all the details are not given here in the show notes or podcast episode — they are in the podnews.net article. I strongly recommend that ALL podcasters consume this article, so that they can see how a real  pro podcaster (i.e., one who wrote the book on podcasting) actually describes his workflow and tasks in the planning, production and publishing of his episodes.

I feel that we can ALL learn something from the old masters (of which I consider Evo one). And some of us may want to compare our own workflow and tasks to see if we need to improve our show with either additional plug-ins, software, or other tasks.

In any case, I feel that any podcaster worth his salt will get enjoyment out of Evo’s article — especially since his sense of humor and his element of “disruption” come out loud and clear in his writing. Please enjoy.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Evo Terra of PodcastPontifications.com and podnews.com. All rights reserved.

 

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podcast

473- First look at the Dave Jackson book on monetizing podcasts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss in the form of an overview the contents of the recent book from Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting called “Profit from your Podcast: Proven Strategies  to Turn Listeners into a Livelihood.” (from Allworth Press, New York)

Thus, this episode was my impromptu review of the contents of the book and the perceived value at first glance from myself, a podcaster of  15 years. Thus, it is a form of “stream-of-consciousness” description, with a few editorial comments. And I do apologize for the extraneous noise from my flipping the pages next to my condenser microphone.

One big bonus is the bonus course from Dave for those who have bought the book. I really look forward to getting the content and resources from this course — and I do plan to report on this later on in an episode.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.