Categories
podcast

432- Getting sponsors for Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some suggestions delivered by several well-known podcasters on the theme of acquiring sponsors for your podcast. These suggestions were delivered in a July, 2020, post specified in email delivered to a distributiion list that was titled “4 Industry Experts On How to Get Podcast Sponsors.” And it was published by Captivate.com. From M. Asquith, “Captivate is a Rebel Base Media platform, made with  in the U.K.”

The four experts cited are:

This article was quite long in its explanation. But for me, hearing from both Evo Terra and Daniel J Lewis interested me. Not only are they long-time associates of mine and podcasters whom I have interviewed over the past 15 years, but their sincerity and their expertise is always acclaimed by myself in promoting them forward.

In fact, sponsorship is a theme for monetization for which they have been dealing and in which they have much experience. But I feel that they left out a key expert in this field from the Blubrry network, namely Todd Cochrane of the New Media Show podcast.


So this article answers the key question of  “How do you get Podcast Sponsors for your show?” as presented to these four individuals.

And so here is a brief list of their responses (and there are a few paragraphs to explain each response):

1. Do… Think About If Podcast Sponsorship Is Right For You
2. Don’t… Forget About Your Listeners
3. Do… Use Social Proof
4. Don’t… Be Afraid To Ask!
5. Do… Prepare Your Podcast Sponsorship Pitch
[Note:  according to the author, this may sound easy, and he says it actually is — with the following items being addressed in his “sponsor kit” — and his final message:
6. Putting It All Together: How to Find
Podcast Sponsors:
“Getting there is simple: keep it relevant, keep it entertaining, and most of all:
be confident that your podcast and audience is valuable.”

Now, Mark Asquith has been a relevant speaker at the Podcast Movement conferences and different events — and I myself saw his presentation at the last inbound Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions conference. He has had success in gaining notoriety.

And so, from some of the top experts with experience in the field of sponsorship, I would suggest that you consume the content of this post. And if your marketing and sales plans for your business contain the element of sponsorship for monetizing your podcasts, then this may be a gem waiting for your to create elements in your checklist for marketing tactics. And we hope that this will help your podcast become more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Mark Asquith . All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

407- Considerations in starting a podcast network

In this episode of podcastreporter.com, we focus on the question of whether to join or even start your own Podcast Network. This theme came to me from a couple of recent episodes from Evo Terra in his Podcast Pontifications show, as well as Daniel J Lewis in his show, The Audacity to Podcast.

If your passion for podcasting has grown such that you want to join or even create your own podcast network, perhaps you should listen to the questions asked by Evo Terra, as well as listen to the experiences (the good, the bad and the ugly) from Daniel J Lewis (who did shut down his own podcast network that he started years ago).

My own experiences with podcast networks

Now, I have had experiences with the thought of joining a podcast network. In 2006 and 2007, I dipped my toes into the waters of joining what looked like a growing podcast network at Podango (this was the podcast company that had acquired Gigavox, the firm that created the Levelator in 2006). I wanted to be a part of what was called a “podcast station” (which was the category or genres of podcasts) called the Business Station. I wanted to include my flagship podcast at the time, Struggling Entrepreneur. And the sharing, the community and the financial benefits all seemed like a great beginning. However, I did have second thoughts about letting someone else run my show and own my RSS feed and content. So I decided NOT to join and just kept being on my own. And, by the way, I do not regret that decision, as Podango later went out of business in another year or two.

Then, in 2007, the podcast network bug bit me again. This time, I wanted to start a podcast network which I had temporarily called the “Content Creator and podcaster network.” This was going to be basically a membership site with 4 founders — one for the technical side of podcasting; another for the financial side of startups and podcasting; another for the marketing side of podcasting and its promotion; and my contribution, the personal productivity side of creating content and podcasts.

For this membership site, we even had a meeting which I had called. And I used the prior method of getting buy-in and commitment and dialog used by Tim Bourquin when he had founded the Podcast and Portable Media Expo in 2005. That is, I invited everyone to join me personally (at my expense for travel, lodging and meals) for a couple of days in Austin, Texas, so that we could discuss all day the creation of this membership site which would then create the network shortly after launch. In fact, we even had an attorney, who was himself a podcaster, join us via Skype to get the details of the contract which he would create for all of us to agree and sign as a commitment. Well, that meeting gave me an indication of how much CONTROL and OWNERSHIP and FINANCIAL EXPECTATION that podcasters desired. As a result, I saw that this arrangement would not suit all the parties involved — what seemed like an exciting discussion and proposal went down in flames when “the devil is in the details.” So we never gave the green light to create the contract (with legal fees of $1300 in those days), and we disbanded the idea. And the survivors were only two of us who started another podcast based on Finance for Startups (which has since podfaded).

What was obvious to me at that time, after some pre-investment expenses and time, was that podcasters were too much desirous of control and ownership of the direction. And this is only natural, since podcasting at that time was individually run, owned and managed by the solo podcaster. And these people were not used to SHARING any intellectual property or revenue with others, especially under contract.

So the notion of a podcast network or membership site was erased from my mind as a creator — and maybe one day I might join one already in session.

The 2 recent episodes about podcast networks

In a recent episode by Evo Terra in his show called Podcast Pontifications, the title of his script and audio episode was “Should you join or form a podcast network?”

In this audio episode, Evo asks the most important questions: What is it that you want to get out of the network, and what is it that you will be willing to sacrifice to belong in it? He not only goes over what his own backstory was in creating his own network back “in the day” of 2004 and following, but also how a loose confederation of podcasters can be just a social club rather than a really serious podcast network (and he describes what should be in a podcast network from his point of view).

So the benefits vs. the contributions is a matrix that you should put together to evaluate an existing podcast network that you may feel compelled to join. Also, if you wish to start one, you should examine deep in yourself what you really want to get out of managing this type of organization and see if you have the talent and skills to do so effectively, without having the passion of podcasting be lost due to frustrations because of your potential lack of skills.

And Evo relates what, in his opinion, is really needed for a good podcast network today.

Now, the other example with some lessons learned comes from Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show. He describes how he put together his network shortly after he joined podcasting in full force — and also the end of his network, along with the reasons why he ended it.

In his recent episode called “Why we retired our podcast network,” Daniel mentions that he had clear-cut goals when he created his podcast network: “My goal was to bring together like-minded podcasters with high-quality shows to grow together through synergy, community, support, crosspromotion, and sponsorship.”

However, what seemed to me to be more or less a society of like-minded individuals with different podcast shows from different genres and possibly some unrelated themes soon grew into a long list of participating shows in the network, like the following:

  • The Ramen Noodle
  • Are You Just Watching
  • The Audacity to Podcast
  • Beyond the To-Do List
  • The Productive Woman
  • Christian Meets World
  • The Sci-Phi Show
  • ONCE
  • Welcome to Level Seven
  • WONDERLAND
  • Under the Dome Radio
  • Resurrection Revealed
  • Podcasting Videos by The Audacity to Podcast
  • Inside the Podcasting Business
  • As you can see, this could appear to be a community of disjointed themes and topics, with possibly the intent to generate sponsorship, financial rewards from downloads and advertising, as well as cross-promotion. And Daniel then explains what things he did well in the network and what things that were done poorly:
  • Audience-relevant common theme
  • Cross-promotion
  • Cross-integration
  • Full and consistent community
  • and you can listen to his audio podcast episode to get the details. Then he states why he retired the network, including the ability for him to focus on fewer things, as well as giving each podcaster more room to expand.

So Daniel’s experiences deliver some lessons learned about starting a podcast network, and I would suggest that you take these into account if you get the passion to go beyond your own podcast shows and want to start your own network.

Considerations for the podcaster about Podcast Network

As a podcaster, what passion can be driving you toward wanting to start a great podcast network? Will you have the time? Will the additional workload and timetables and schedules and management of the network be something you will embrace, as well as have time for? Will you have the necessary skills to manage your network? Will you have the right temperment for being in the network? And will the podcasts in the network be the right ones, or will they be a hodge-podge collection of your favorite podcasters and additional genres and other topics that might not relate well to some audiences? Will the network be governed by contract or by word-of-mouth agreements?

So, whatever your decision may be concerning podcast networks may be (i.e., either joining one or starting one of your own), we hope that these two audio episodes can give you enough food for thought to know what to expect both from the contribution side and the giving side to the network.

So we hope that your podcast show will be successful, whether it be a part of a podcast network or not.

Thank you for your attention

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Daniel J Lewis and Evo Terra of Podcastpontifications.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

397- Considerations in changing podcast formats

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the topic of possibly changing the format of your podcast episodes. This theme was brought to us by an article by Dan Misener as stated in the podnews.net newsletter. In fact, this question was also asked by Evo Terra in his podcast show called Podcast Pontifications.

The features that may be targets for change are the time and length of the show (e.g., long-form to short-form, or micro-casting, etc.), the types of intros and outros, themes, music, calls-to-action, etc. These are things that you can adapt to your listeners based on the idea of getting away from the current stressful situation of the virus crisis.

We hope that you can examine and do the research needed to see  if you need to have a change in the format items of your podcast show. Hopefully, this will bring you more success in a more positive light.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and podnews.net and Dan Misener and Evo Terra of PodcastPontifications.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

383- Good SEO steps — an Evo Terra perspective

In this episode, the topic proposed by Evo Terra of Podcast Pontifications was that of SEO (search engine optimization) being hard — and whether it is worth it for a podcaster (from the April, 2020 publication in the audio episode and show notes).

From my own perspective, I have mixed feelings about the amount of effort needed for good SEO — including the education, training and implementation that includes follow-up and tracking. With the goal of being ranked in the top ten listings of search engines, this is a heavy-duty objective, knowing that there are over a million podcast shows today.

As Evo mentions in his episode, he describes the various stages of the SEO stages (and since he is an expert about SEO since 2005) in some of the following  steps:

  • Planning;
  • Pre-production
  • Recording and production;
  • Post-production
  • Publication
  • Syndication
  • Monitoring
  • End-result

We highly recommend that you consume this episode and/or show notes text. I feel that many can learn the truth about good SEO.

From my own perspective, there is one other resource with experience and technical ability in SEO that offers a course called SEO FOR PODCASTERS. And this is available from Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast.

For your own efforts of SEO with your podcast show, we hope that you can learn good habits from whatever training or education resource you may have, and then apply good steps and have excellent results from your SEO efforts.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Evo Terra of Podcastpontifications.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

369- Podcasting during a pandemic

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the environment for the podcaster during a current epidemic (actually, a “plandemic”) in the early months of 2020, as we can plan to “podcast our way through the virus crisis.”

We refer to Evo Terra at PodcastPontifications, as well as another podcasters for suggestions.

The new habits and processes are described for podcasters who have to do remote interviews (with either software or using double-enders). This would include new strategies and spending more time in the consumption of podcast content.

Examples for me are the NoAgendaShow.com podcast, with Adam Curry and John C Dvorak.

Regardless of your situation, we hope that you can do the best podcasting (both listening and creating) during these times that “try men’s souls.”

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

353- Podcast speakers — credibility and credentials

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we deliver some perspectives of being able to judge the value of those chosen to be speakers or keynotes at podcast conferences — whether they are virtual or in-person or inbound events.

Track records, validity and credentials deliver TRUST and valid proof of the content for these speakers.

A quote from Evo Terra and his Podcast Pontifications show hits the nail on the head — “the speakers may not be the experts that they promote themselves to be.” The danger is misinformation and sometimes incorrect data.

Remember:  “only the phoney” may have the disguise of phoniness or fraud. And your critical thinking and deconstruction of the content may be your salvation from being subject to the wrong info that will contain no value for you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

342- Podcast birthday and a journey in podcasting by a luminary

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the anniversary of a birthday in podcasting, as well as the journey into podcasting which we describe.

The birthday which we discuss is that of the first podcast show and podcast episode from this podcast reporter (from 2006).

As you will hear in this audio episode, the learning curve for podcasting was helped by the book by Evo Terra and Tee Morris called Podcasting for Dummies. This book was a good start, but the online tutorial by Jason Van Orden called How to Create a Podcast was the final resource that helped me to create my first podcast called Arriba!

And finally, mentorship and instruction from Dave Jackson in his School of Podcasting allowed me to grow and attend podcast conferences — especially meeting Paul Colligan, Leo LaPorte, Tee Morris and Jason Van Orden.

And the final part of this audio episode describes the swift journey that resulted in myself growing into being a luminary (as referred to by Paul Colligan).

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

293- APODCalypse in podcasting from Evo Terra viewpoint

In this repurposed audio episode of The Podcast Reporter, we refer to Evo Terra of Podcast Pontifications and his theme about APODCalypse.

Of course, this episode was published in late December of the previous year — before the plandemic.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (C)  22020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.