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437- What we have learned so far … Chris Brogan

In this episode, we focus on some thoughts that were delivered to us by a thought leader, Chris Brogan, in an email from his subscription list. The mail was dated 9 August 2020, and the subject was: “What we’ve learned so far.”

In addition, as one of the earliest podcasters in 2004 and 2005, he was one of the four founders of the podcamp events, which are barcamp-style inbound conferences that had several good ideas — among them, no fees for everyone, and all people were participants and not attendees, and that anyone could present and share without having to be in a psuedo-elite class.

Because I have known Chris since 2010 in our in-person meeting (and since 2007 in various podcamps and other podcast meetings and entrepreneur venues), I thought that his words-of-wisdom may be beneficial for both podcasters and entrepreneurs.


My dealings with Chris Brogan

The last time I met in person with Chris was in 2014 at the initial Podcast Movement conference in Dallas, in which he was the keynote speaker to kick off the first ever conference of this type (which is still going strong, with a virtual conference scheduled for October).

Before then, I had actually had an interview with him and Julien Smith, as co-authors of the book, Trust Agents. And we discussed the plights and tribulations and benefits that faced the entrepreneur at the time. In fact, I did record the interview, and it was published in PodcastReporter.com as a bonus episode on 28September2009.

And when it came time for him to be the keynote speaker of the very first Podcast Movement conference event in 2014, I was there with him to get his ideas for entrepreneur and podcaster success factors. So I did manage to corral him in a corner of the conference during a few moments which he did not have scheduled in a break-out or session, and I managed to get an interview at the Podcast Movement Conference in 2014:

The latter was known as episode # 12 of this show.


Now, sometimes the original text of a short email and what is said is much more important than a summary or an abridged edition. In this case, I felt that for the entrepreneur and podcaster to get the maximum benefit of this conversation, it would be best to deliver the entire message from Chris. And knowing him personally as I do (and, yes, I have purchased some of his webinars and offers from him before), I know that the would not mind for me to share these words with you. And if you find this of value, you may want to go to his web site and subscribe, or go to his YouTube channel of The BackPack

And there, you can also subscribe to his video channel and latest delivery of information.


“What we’ve learned so far…”

And here is the email letter that was sent out by Chris Brogan to his network of subscribers on 9 August 2020:

“All the world’s a stage, Fred.

Seems that way in pandemic-ville, doesn’t it? Endless Zoom calls (remember Skype?), and every speaker and podcaster friend I know getting back into video. It’s a very visual world for some.

I launched The Backpack Show originally to be a way to just connect and stay in touch. A …point of contact. Then, I shifted it to be a way to …catch up. Then, I knew I wanted to do it even better, so I brought Kerry O’Shea Gorgone in as consiglieri and co-host, and that’s the show.

Last week, I talked about the graphics changing the world. I thought I’d share some more learnings from the show as they apply to YOUR business and how to promote.

Steal These Learnings

Package – the ads and graphics conversation from last week covers this. You need visuals to really pop the projects you work on. Naming something is good. LABELING it is better.

Guide The Community – doing the Backpack Show for a little while now, it’s easy to feel like everyone’s been there to see every episode. There’s always someone new, so be crisp in guiding people through every experience. “It’s a business show, but with morning show energy” is one of our taglines because we’re setting the stage for what to expect. Do this often.

Promote – we’re getting ready to do a few Facebook ads to see if that pumps the numbers. Feels like it will. For as much as I ever tweet, or if Kerry tweets, that still drives very little traffic. If the guest shares the show with their community, the show pops.

Go Beyond – our guest list over the last few weeks and upcoming shows:

  • Mountain climber
  • Former pro football player/CEO
  • Professional comedians (2)
  • Magician/Positioning Expert
  • Broadway actor/singers (2)
  • The voice of Siri
  • NASCAR driver
  • Pro wrestler
  • YouTube celebrities (2)
  • Poop doctor
  • Chef
  • Adult film star and model
  • Futurists (2)

What’s interesting is that every time we invite one of our marketing or sales or business peers or friends, the results of attendance are mixed. Fewer views and less engagement for people in my same industry. Much more attendance and energy around the more unique guests.

Unknown is whether the perceived value of attending one type of show versus another changes. If you learn something from Daniel Pink or whoever, does it matter if fewer people see it than Scotland’s darling Janey Godley (who had 100x more views)?

Community-Driven – you know me. Everything I do has a massive community element. The show has live comments. We just launched a show email. We talk to guests and the community all the time on places like Twitter. Even more gratifying is we see people reach out and embrace our guests and thus expand those people’s communities even more. Threading together good people is the primary driving force behind how we execute the show.

Worth Checking Out / Thinking About

Not directly related to the show, but maybe so, it’s worth thinking about a few details:

  • People are consuming more video every day.
  • Very short form (sub 1 minute) and long form (over 30 minutes) seem to be the highest growth categories.
  • Instagram continues to gain attention share away from Twitter, Facebook, and the other social networks.
  • Email marketing is still the best platform for people hoping to do business with people and not just entertain.
  • People continue to make the transition from laptops/desktops to mobile-only computing/device usage. It’s a mobile world. Plan your business around that.

Finally – It’s the Work

You have what you sell and all that entails, but this – *waves hands around* – is also the work. Make content that engages. Connect with people around that content. It’s an easy model:

Content — Community — Marketplace

Build content that attracts people

Nurture those people into a community you serve

Articulate a marketplace that serves that community

That’s your work. Not just being good at your job. Not just running your company. It must be visible. And very very reinforced through repetition.

Are you ready for that?

Chris…”


We hope that these words from Chris Brogan may help to strengthen your resolve to succeed, in spite of the “Plandemic” and fearmongering and mask-debates going on during the virus crisis.

We hope that you can reflect on what you have learned so far, and that this will help to get you aimed at the targets of not only where you will want to go in the near future, but the success targets that you will have to learn in the coming months and years.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Chris Brogan. All rights reserved.

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podcast

435- Podcasting virtual conferences and their efficacy

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the value of meetings and conferences for entrepreneurs as a result of this virus crisis of 2020 — especially since face-to-face or inbound meetings have always resulted in high value and returns for attendees or participants.

This episode is from the original point of view of this entrepreneur and podcaster — and we zero in on the podcast events and conferences of the past 15 years, with its ROI and value delivered as a result of participation (either as an attendee or a panelist in a session or as a presenter, etc.).

My background with events spans over 40 years — 30 of them in corporate America as an employee of a large multinational, and over 19 years as an entrepreneur. I had attended many events as both a demonstrator and attendee, as well as a presenter in the USA and other countries worldwide. So I have had plenty of experience in what is called “Events Marketing” and have seen the development of new practices and techniques and skills for events — both inbound and outbound (or virtual).

However, with this new plandemic of the virus crisis of 2020, most of the events have been canceled or shut down for the remainder of the year 2020. And even though some of the larger ones tried to reschedule for the latter part of the year, it was still evident that the ROI for the hosting organization of the event would not be realized, and so a cancellation and/or postponement was the only alternative.

Recently, I had participated both as a speaker and an attendee in the podcast conferences — from the New Media Expo (that dealt with all new media, such as blogs, video, screencasting and podcasting, etc.) to the Podcast Movement conferences, etc. And before then, I participated as demonstrator, speaker and attendee at the smaller inbound conferences such as the Podcasting events (e.g., the original Podcast and Portable Media Expo) and smaller Podcamps, etc.


So the question is: now that events have had to switch to a virtual “venue” over the internet, what value has been lost and what value has been gained?

Value Gained — especially ROI

The best part of the virtual conference is really a boon for the bean-counters — or for your budget, if you are a solo-preneur. That is, the SAVINGS in hard dollars that would have been spent in travel, lodging, food, laundry, transportation to and from the event, and other costs associated with inbound conferences that required an entrepreneur to go to an outside venue either to the other side of town or clear across the country (or even another country). The ROI possibility is greatly improved.

In addition, for HEALTH and HYGIENE reasons, the inbound events also save the entrepreneur from virus and health problems. This could be from the air circulated on an aircraft to and from the venue, to the hand-shaking, to the crowds at the event, and to the close proximity of demonstrators in the exhibit area when one is getting a demo of a product or getting information, etc. So there is no problem of contracting any colds or flu or other viruses (especially in late fall and winter times, such as those events in Las Vegas).

But besides the money saved and NOT spent, and besides the avoidance of hygienic and health threats, what are the OTHER values from avoiding the inbound conference?


“Paradise Lost” — especially in relationships and community

You can hear the list of valuable ROI engagements as discussed in recent podcast episodes from Evo Terra of Podcast Pontifications. In this podcast, he discusses the fact that the same type of relationship-building and getting to know someone in person cannot really be duplicated in a Zoom meeting or virtual conference over several days, where the speaker or demonstrator is speaking to a camera and not to a human being.

I agree wholeheartedly with Evo on that account. The last inbound conference I did attend was the Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions event in Los Angeles (just before the lockdown occurred). I was able to re-energize with some of my fellow podcasters, as well as get to know some new contacts in person. The value and the nature of the relationship was unique only to person-to-person engagements and cannot be duplicated over the network with poor quality (as in zoom) or via a one-on-many presentation with poor audio and video. The Q-and-A portion of a virtual event cannot compare to asking a question live in front of the speaker or guest, and then later on catching that individual in the hallway or in the session room to get a one-on-one discussion, as well as handing a business card and asking for an interview, etc.

What seemed to be a great landscape and opportunity to derive value for future engagements, products, services, offerings and especially JOINT VENTURES was something which, unfortunately, I seemed to have taken for granted. And I think a lot of us can “resemble that remark” (as said by the cartoon cat, Garfield).

That great part of the in-person meetings and conferences was LOST — in fact, it seemed to me to be a “paradise lost” (as permitted by Milton) to the entrepreneur.

In addition, as a demonstrator, I was able to influence and promote my products, services, offerings, offers and web site, podcasts and other assets to the attendees and reporters of an event in a most influential way (that got good, measurable results) when I was in the exhibit hall of such a conference. And in the virtual world, this is entirely a situation lost.


The future and Regaining the value

So how can we regain the value of events in this re-defined normal of the world because of this plandemic and virus crisis, both now and after it is over?

For myself, as an entrepreneur and podcaster, I will continue to be VERY skeptical of the events as they go through their growing-up period of availability over the internet. I have already sat through different events, such as the SHIFT event from the PodcastMovement.com team. And for me, this registered as a very low 2 on a scale of 1 to 10, where 10 is excellent.

That does not mean to say that I will not risk to invest in other sessions or events. I have registered for the upcoming and non-refundable Podcast Movement Virtual conference for 2020, just to see how it is and compare it to other events. While I am hoping to get greater value out of that (comparing it to the Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions inbound conference), I am not holding my breath — for I forsee some growing pains still going through their evolution, with the attendees as the losers on this end.

Thus, as long as you, as an entrepreneur, can keep a skeptical eye and know what type of VALUE should be delivered to you by these events, you can be a good judge and critical thinker of their worth to you. And you should be able to see how and what type of improvements are occurring in the world of virtual events.

With your eye on lower costs and your desire to obtain VALUE for your time and attendance (and cost from the entry fee or virtual ticket), you should be able to put together what we have always advised — a COST-BENEFIT-ANALYSIS chart with your expected outcomes and results. And with this, you can make a determination to either wait until the events go back to inbound or to receive the VALUE in some other form of delivery, be it by way of virtual conferences, webinars, calls with others on the network, podcasts, screencasts or other media and technologies.

We hope that you can plan for — and receive — the value you deserve after determining whether or not to participate in some way to a virtual event in the near future. As for myself, I will be skeptical, but I will also reach out to take a low-cost risk to see this new paradigm of events for entrepreneurs.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation  . All rights reserved.

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podcast

432- Getting sponsors for Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some suggestions delivered by several well-known podcasters on the theme of acquiring sponsors for your podcast. These suggestions were delivered in a July, 2020, post specified in email delivered to a distributiion list that was titled “4 Industry Experts On How to Get Podcast Sponsors.” And it was published by Captivate.com. From M. Asquith, “Captivate is a Rebel Base Media platform, made with  in the U.K.”

The four experts cited are:

This article was quite long in its explanation. But for me, hearing from both Evo Terra and Daniel J Lewis interested me. Not only are they long-time associates of mine and podcasters whom I have interviewed over the past 15 years, but their sincerity and their expertise is always acclaimed by myself in promoting them forward.

In fact, sponsorship is a theme for monetization for which they have been dealing and in which they have much experience. But I feel that they left out a key expert in this field from the Blubrry network, namely Todd Cochrane of the New Media Show podcast.


So this article answers the key question of  “How do you get Podcast Sponsors for your show?” as presented to these four individuals.

And so here is a brief list of their responses (and there are a few paragraphs to explain each response):

1. Do… Think About If Podcast Sponsorship Is Right For You
2. Don’t… Forget About Your Listeners
3. Do… Use Social Proof
4. Don’t… Be Afraid To Ask!
5. Do… Prepare Your Podcast Sponsorship Pitch
[Note:  according to the author, this may sound easy, and he says it actually is — with the following items being addressed in his “sponsor kit” — and his final message:
6. Putting It All Together: How to Find
Podcast Sponsors:
“Getting there is simple: keep it relevant, keep it entertaining, and most of all:
be confident that your podcast and audience is valuable.”

Now, Mark Asquith has been a relevant speaker at the Podcast Movement conferences and different events — and I myself saw his presentation at the last inbound Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions conference. He has had success in gaining notoriety.

And so, from some of the top experts with experience in the field of sponsorship, I would suggest that you consume the content of this post. And if your marketing and sales plans for your business contain the element of sponsorship for monetizing your podcasts, then this may be a gem waiting for your to create elements in your checklist for marketing tactics. And we hope that this will help your podcast become more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Mark Asquith . All rights reserved.

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430A- Strategies on being a speaker at a podcast conference

In this repurposed episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review for you once again some strategies that can help you apply to be a speaker for a podcast conference (either virtual or in-person). We will also deliver a list of BENEFITS, as well as DETRIMENTS, in becoming a conference or meeting speaker for podcasting.

This episode is being delivered to you, as a podcaster, since we have received the email from the Podcast Movement team in which podcasters are being INVITED to apply to be a speaker or panelist or exhibitor for the upcoming annual conference — and this year, it will be virtual. So for 2020, the online delivery may be your strength, instead of having to present in person to large crowds or gatherings. This can be a benefit for some podcasters. And so this episode can be timely for those podcasters who may still be sitting on the fence and have not decided if they should try to be a speaker (instead of an attendee) at the upcoming Podcast Movement fall conference.


Now, the laundry list for both benefits and detriments is long and is too numerous to list here, in the show notes. Instead, this EVERGREEN content can assist many new or aspiring podcasters to decide if now is the time to apply for being a conferenece session speaker or as a panelist participant in such a conference. Or perhaps the best thing would be to be a demonstrator or exhibitor in the exhibit area of the conference.

So we hope that these strategies and tactics can help you become a great speaker or presenter or panelist or exhibitor at the upcoming Podcast Movement conference — or any other podcast conference. And we wish you the best in delivering your best content or demonstrating or exhibiting your best offerings and sites at the event in a virtual manner this year (and possibly in person for next year in Nashville).

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and PodcastMovement.com. All rights reserved.

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422- Podcasting Pundit Paul Colligan at Podcast Movement 2020

In this issue of PodcastReporter.com, we repurpose a prior episode of this show (#328), where we interviewed Paul Colligan on the exhibit hall show floor of the Podcast Movement 2020 conference (known as Evolutions).

Now, Paul Colligan has been a podcaster since 2004, and he has been a strategist for profitable podcasting. He also developed and sold his own product in 2007-2008 that provided support for a one-to-one RSS feed delivery and key deliverables for good revenue streams and podcasts (which was known as PremiumCast).

In addition to being a luminary, a content creator with videos, blogs and other media deliverables, Paul is also a screencaster, a solution provider, a trusted advisor  and thought leader for the podcasting and New Media space. He is highly regarded by all of the early podcasters and has been not only a role model, but also a mentor to many (such as myself). As a matter of fact, my I was a member of his “member” program called New Media Inner Circle and also took his course called Podcast Secrets in 2007.

Now, we had interviewed Paul before a major event that was the key for podcasters in 2015 (i.e., the NMX or New Media Expo in Las Vegas). In that episode, Paul gave us not only the state of the podosphere at that time, but also where he felt that podcasting would be going in the next five years — that is, 2020). And here is the link to the audio file:

Paul plans to launch yet another podcast, and he will call it The Aging Tech Show. This is planned to be a model for podcasting that will be current with a lot of fun for strategies for profitable podcasting — among other things.

In addition, Paul also will update his book series on podcasting (originally started with the title of “How to Podcast” — since 2015 and 2016).

So, we encourage all podcasters to subscribe to his podcast show called The Podcast Report. It is delivered by Paul for each season, and it contains gems that do prove to be of value to all podcasters.

We hope that all you podcasters enjoy Paul’s books, his videos, his new show, as well as The Podcast Report — and that the content from his programs will help to make you successful in your podcasting.

Thank you for our attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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421A- Podcast Movement Conference- now only virtual in October

Yes, that’s right. As we predicted in a past episode of The Podcast Reporter show, the Plandemic of 2020 (due to the fearmongering of the “lame-stream” media) has forced the PodcastMovement.com team to cancel their inbound (in-person) event scheduled for August, 2020  — and switch the event to only a virtual (online) conference.

The email notice went out on 22 July 2020 to subscribers to the PodMov Daily newsletter (as well as past attendees of the Podcast Movement 2020-Evolutions conference).

The notice also stated an “early-bird” pricing structure that is valid for just a limited time. The rates for participation stand (at this time) for $99 USD or $199 USD or $599 USD. The web site has a description for the value to be delivered for each of these prices. And the registration is available online at the PodcastMovement.com site.

For this podcaster, I am investigating the value that I could derive from this type of virtual event in the same way that I would explore and plan for attending a live event (which would normally incur costs of travel, lodging, food, etc.). For example, I am anxious to see the schedule, the speakers, the time frames, etc. However, at this time, both the details for the speakers and schedule and other sessions are still being created. And thus, I will wait to see when they will be delivered online.

In the meantime, I plan to contact the key people whom I would normally interview or make contact with at a live event to see if they would be speaking (or had submitted an application to speak or present). In my communication with them, I would schedule a time and date during the event to have a telephone chat with them (normally during breaks or before/after sessions and keynotes). And this would have to suffice for my not being able to speak to them in person or interview them on the show floor of what would normally be the exhibit hall of a live event.

And thus, this would be the value for me to join this community and register for the virtual event.

But what is important for me as a podcaster is to do the right type of planning for participating in a podcast conference event. There is no change in trying to determine the ROI for this event — although the normal ROI would have a lower amount of investment in cash or money, and thus have much of the TIME and attendance in the participation to gauge a possible return for me. This would include checking my possible results against a list of my planned objectives in detail to determine if this event is right show in which to participate as an attendee.

Obviously, I myself have not applied to be a speaker or presenter or member of a panel at this event. But if I would have wanted to participate in this way, I would also put into the ROI plan the amount of time and effort that I would have to spend in preparing for my participation as someone other than just an attendee.

If you, as a podcaster, were wanting to speak or present or participate in a panel, then I would suggest that this type of planning also be included into the objectives vs. effort vs. results in your ROI plan.

So, in the meantime, I see myself possibly registering as just an attendee at the $99 USD rate (since some of the critical details are not available yet), and then ensure that I am aware of what the cancellation processes are (just in case I don’t feel that the value would be there). However, I think that this latter possibility would be very low if my contacts would confirm that they would also participate or attend this virtual event.

So, if you are planning to participate and attend the virtual Podcast Movement 2020 event in October, we hope that your planning for the event and the preparation of of a good ROI strategy would confirm that this event would add to the positive success of your show and bring you the profitable podcasting environment for you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and PodcastMovement.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

419- Review of SHIFT virtual meeting — Podcast University

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we report on my perspectives of the virtual conference or meeting named SHIFT delivered on 14July2020 by the podcastmovement.com  team at their inaugural celebration for Podcast University.

Now, I myself had joined the program (it was a free signup for any podcaster in early July, 2020). And so I was interested in the element of COMMUNITY and good CONTENT for podcast episodes and generating podcast ideas — perhaps these ideas could spawn good themes and topics for content in my podcast episodes of my podcast show, PodcastReporter.com.

When I got online and entered the virtual meeting, I was surprised to see that not one of the experienced podcasters with the authority and the credentials and with over 14 years of podcasting and being a thought leader was on the agenda. In fact, I had only known of one of the podcasters that presented a summary of an Edison report for the audience — but it was only limited to 30 minutes.

In fact, it was quite obvious that the podcast crew who ran this free session had a specific agenda for their point of view. And in my opinion, I saw nothing that I really got out of the several hours of the day that addressed my objectives having joined the “university” — which were community and content.

In fact, it is only my opinion that you will NOT hear from podcasters who have the credentials, experience, skills, objectivity and content from this group — and I am talking about people like Adam Curry, Dave Jackson, Douglas Welch, Todd Cochrane, Ray Ortega, Rob Greenlee, Gordon Firemark, etc. Because, in my opinion, these podcasters just mentioned give an objective viewpoint and deliver VALUE (and not just causes) to the listeners, as well as great hints and tips to their audiences on many platforms.

If you are curious to see what the agenda was for this session, the text from the session with the schedule has been made into a pdf for your perusal, and it is here:

https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/fgcastgain/Shift_schedule_for_14July2020.pdf

In fact, the only session that, in my opinion, was worth consuming, was the Edison report about the Latino listening report. I felt that the background for the study done about this, as well as the charts used and presented, and the conclusions reached all seemed to address the podcast questions about an audience for podcasters that can be nurtured and addressed by today’s podcasters — and even in English, and not just in Spanish. And this was the description of this specific session (with the hours being in Eastern Time zone): “1:51 PM – Latino Podcast Listener Report Gabriel Soto of Edison Research & Martina Castro of Adonde Media will present the Latino Podcast Listener Report, and discuss how podcasters can use this data to grow their podcast and expand their reach.”

Thus, if you are into “rainbows and unicorns,” then pershaps the spirit and delivery of this session is appropriate. But for the experienced podcasters who wish to receive more skills, content and help to grow the community of their audience — then this type of session and virtual venue may not satisfy the bill completely for them.

It will be interesting to see how the speakers and the theme of Podcast Movement 2020 in Dallas will be aligned with this type of SHIFT movement — and whether ALL podcasters can benefit from either the in-person or virtual conference, and not just those who are subjectively endeared by the latest SJW or popular causes.

And if you ask what is the take-away for me from these 5 hours of presentations, then I would say that I want to start consuming more Latino podcasts — both in Spanish and English. Now, I had done so way back in the days of 2006 when there were a handful of Spanish-speaking podcasts (mainly from Iberian Spain, like Pato Pascual, El Podcast de No tengo iPhone, Podcastellanos, etc.). And even though I had published several episodes in Mexican Spanish (which is my native language, since I, myself, am Hispanic), I had concentrated for the last 12 years of podcasting in English. So that one session showed me an opportunity that I am missing by not addressing the Latino-Mexico audience today. And I can then make plans to create, plan, and possibly launch a podcast in the near future in Spanish.

So, we hope that your take-aways from this agenda-oriented format can be positive for you, as well, and that you can then help to grow your podcast show and be more successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and PodcastMovement.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

412A- Podcast University — the third attempt

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the recent announcement of the latest version of a “Podcast University” offering. This offering will host a virtual meeting on 14 July 2020.

Now, the first 2 attempts started way back in 2007 and then repeated again in 2014 — and both started, but did not succeed:


Now, in early July, the announcement has arrived for a new attempt at a Podcast University. The link for this can be found at:  university.podcastmovement.com  and I, myself, have just joined the community. Yes, it is free at this time (maybe not so later on). And I have contributed one post in the chat room.

Now, instead of going in to all the detail of this site, perhaps it is better to encourage you, as a podcaster, to join for free and attend the event on 14July2020 that will kick off this project.

So, this very brief episode is just to inform you that this will be going on. And we hope that this third attempt to create a Podcast University can succeed.

Thank you for your attention, and we hope that you can find value in this Podcast University.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and PodcastMovement.com . All rights reserved.

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349- Possible future of podcasting and big money

This episode of PodcastReporter.com focuses on the theme that the podosphere and podcasting may be under the strength of big money, as the latter will try to steer the podcasting platform away from a level playing field — and thus, control the podosphere.

This topic set afire a storm of frustration and resentment from the keynote address by Hernan Lopez of Wondery at the recent Podcast Movement 2020 conference in Los Angeles.

As you will hear in this brief audio episode, a keynote speaker who knows not his audience and is not aware of awards that have been going on for 15 years in the podosphere may have lost his credibility.

So the argument continues from the hobbyist podcasters and indie podcasters that the playing field must remain level (as professed by Todd Cochrane in his New Media Show podcast), and that these “johnny-come-lately media with money” should not decide on the direction and gatekeeping of the podosphere.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation. All rights reserved.

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podcast

334- The PodQuest show with Michael Neely

In this episode of podcastreporter.com, we deliver an interview with Michael Neely of  The Podquest Show— which was recorded at the recent Podcast Movement 2020 Evolutions conference in California.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Michael Neely of the PodQuest show. All rights reserved.