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podcast

528- Podcast quality from your interview guests

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a recent post in the podcastbusinessjournal.com from Dave Jackson, podcaster of the School of Podcasting, where the topic centered on the audio quality from your interviewee and to whom the blame should be leveled. The title of this post was also mentioned in the podnews.net newsletter, and it was: “Stop blaming your guest for bad audio.”

In this post, Dave mentions that you, the interviewer, is really to be held responsible for any episode interview where your guest has bad audio. Dave says that you are to blame for letting bad audio be recorded and published in your podcast show interviews.

And Dave delivers to us several options so that you would not have to deal with sloppy or bad audio in your published interview — for example:

  •  Dave says: “You control what guests make it to your listener’s ears.”
  • Just as a potential prospect may ask you for examples from your portfolio of either art, podcasts, videos, etc., so, too, you can do the same to qualify (and later vet) a potential interviewee:  “When I have people pitch me to be on my show, if they’ve done their homework and connected their expertise to my audience (which 98% of them don’t) one of the first things I’m going to ask is, “Do you have a link to a previous interview so I can hear your audience quality?”
  • As far as equipment goes, Dave suggests several low-cost options for interviewees to deliver quality audio when they record (especially if you are doing a double-ender) — e.g., the Samson Q2U is an ideal mic (which used to be the AT202x series of mics), as well as the Blue Yeti (as long as it is configured properly and placed in the correct positions for quality audio capture). Now, for myself, there is no mention of the Samson go-mic (which is what I recommended for my co-host to use, and which he has used for 50 podcast episodes as an interviewee or co-host) or other quality mics that are affordable;
  • And finally, Dave suggests what to do for a proper job of planning for audio quality for interviews (and this is merely a way to get the interviewee to obtain the proper equipment for quality, and not a total rejection): “When you say to them, “I’d love to have you on my show, but your audio isn’t currently cutting it. If you want you can order a cheap headset or some earbuds, and we can try again later.” You’re not saying “No.” You’re saying “Not now.” 
  • And then you have the proof of the pudding when you find out why your podcast show may be suffering:  “The bottom line is if you’re wondering why your podcast isn’t growing, it may be that it’s leaving a bad taste in people’s mouth…”

Now, for this podcaster, I have had multiple interviews with many podcasters, celebrities, professionals, etc., during the past 15 years of podcasting. And the worst audio occurred when a guest refused to use a quality mic and agreed to the interview when I had to call him on Skype (remember that old application) and he did the interview from the mic on his smart phone while he was outside. Needless to say, the quality was not good and it would not stand in today’s circles of acceptability. This was an exception, for his partner (also a podcaster and a tech-guy, had wonderful audio when I had interviewed him the year before).

So, unless I know what type of equipment is being used, I would now prefer NOT to conduct an interview over the telephone. I have always preferred to do interviews in person (if possible) with my handy Zoom H2 or H4n or Q3 or even my Zoom H1 that I would hold in my hand, because I could then control the quality of the audio — and I could clean up any wrinkes in post.

But for the newer podcasters or the aspiring interviewers, I would suggest that they should take Dave’s post to heart. Some podcasters have even got to the point of having an extra quality microphone and recorder — and then sending it to the guest, so that quality would not be impaired and all glitches could be corrected in post.

So, we hope that you, as a podcaster, would be very conscientious about the required audio quality in today’s environment and insist that the right mic and the right positions of equipment and settings would be the environment for any future podcast interview recordings with your guests.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson and podcastbusinessjournal.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

526- Lessons learned after 15 years of Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss my own lessons learned and experiences of value gained from podcasting for the last 15 years, when I became a podcaster — with having been within the podosphere as a listener for the prior 2 years (and with listening to over 100 podcast shows per week, as there were not as many shows as there are now).

In a recent edition of the podnews.net newsletter, we had an article that spoke about what experiences and benefits were learned by someone who had just celebrated seven years in podcasting (you can find it at Bruce Wawrzyniak, the host of Now Hear This who celebrated his 7th anniversary of the show with 367 episodes). Well, as a podcaster with over double the time in the podosphere as an active podcaster, and with over 1000 episodes and 2 million downloads, I wanted to also give you some perspective of an old-timer podcaster.

Now, by old-timer, I don’t mean to state that I was one of the original podcasters when the podosphere started. By no means. There were folks like Gary Leland, Todd Cochrane, CC Chapman, Paul Colligan, Rob Walch and Dave Jackson (among others) that already had podcast shows — and some for almost 2 years since 2004. Among them, I seemed to be a newcomer. And my podcast show that I promoted at the time of the early Podcast and Portable Media conference seemed pale in comparison to the work of those earlier maestros.

But now, after 15 years of podcasting, my current flagship podcast show of PodcastReporter.com has between 500 and 600 episodes; my other show of TheStrugglingBiz.com has over 100 episodes; and my other podcast show of 2030podcast.com has over 50 episodes — and the latter is done with a co-host, Matt Cox (a podcaster with over 12 years of his show, Brunch with the Brits.net).

So the question is: what experiences have I learned from podcasting in 15 years? and what is the suggestion that I deliver to new and aspiring podcasters (even though these will never be posted in the podnews.net newsletter)?

  • I have learned that technical skills are important, but that they are not the most important — what is of greatest importance is the value that your show and its episodes will provide to your audience;
  • I have learned that your communication with your audience is critical — and that goes for any planned or unplanned absences (remember — even great podcasters like Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show disappeared for almost six months without leaving word to his audience of any planned or unplanned absence.  But he later made up for it by publishing an episode explaining his forced absence, and then proceeded to return to the podosphere in many formats. And he keeps being a subject matter expert in his own right);
  • I have received value in the faith and commitment of my audience in staying with me, providing me with feedback and commentary, as well as giving word-of-mouth promotion to others in the podosphere;
  • I have received value in seeing the number of downloads increasing for each show (in fact, both The Struggling Entrepreneur podcast show — which has podfaded — and this show have had over 1 million downloads each, and still growing), as well as the popularity of my shows increasing;
  • I have received value when our 2030podcast.com show received promotion on an international live stream — they played episodes from this show to their audiences; they stated that this was a “quality show” to the audience; and they praised the quality of the audio, as well, to their audience and live stream. And they did this WITHOUT any requests from me or any paid promotion or marketing or sales. This occurred because they found value in the show; and as of the date of this episode, it still continues to be published with various episodes and still continues to receive admiration from listeners who found value in the content of this show, even though none of the serendipity results were planned;
  • I found value in other podcasters whom I have met in person or on the web — either a conferences or in remote interviews which I conducted for many of my 16 concurrent podcast shows that I had in 2010, and which I had to whittle down due to health and personal family issues with which I had to deal in 2016 to 2018;
  • and finally, I learned that the VALUE FOR VALUE model applies to podcasters who deliver good content to listeners. I learned this when the value was “treasure” (i.e., monetization), as well as “tech” (i.e., learning valuable technical skills and models), as well as “frienship” value (i.e., starting great relationships with the pundits of podcasting and other podcasters).

And these are just a few of the lessons learned from this podcaster in my 15 years as a podcaster and 17 years within the podosphere.

So, if you think that seven years is a lot of time to learn about value in podcasting, try learning from the podcasters who have spent more than double that time within their craft. This will help deliver lessons learned to the new and aspiring podcasters, so that they can improve their skills and become better deliverers of value to their audiences.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and 2030podcast.com and Matt Cox. All rights reserved.

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podcast

525- Scheduling your episodes in your Podcast show

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss an earlier post in medium.com (to which I was alerted in podnews.net) where the topic is: “Scheduling podcasts Helps you level-up without burning out.”

In this article, the topic of scheduling the date when your podcast episode will go live to your listeners and audience is addressed with the tools in RSS. In another tool, WordPress, I have used the time stamp and date feature to do my scheduling for my episodes — all of them for three podcast shows. I have done this for 15 years, and the workflow and operation that I have from editing the episode to publishing and posting and making it live all seem to flow smoothly.

But in this article that originally appeared in RSS.com podcasting, the author goes into a bit of detail (along with screen shots taken when scheduling and using RSS.com podcasting) for each topic:

  • Schedule everything to maximize efficiency;
  • Schedule when your podcast will go live;
  • Scheduling your podcast will make promotions more manageable;
  • When is the best time to schedule an episode to be released?
  • How to schedule your podcast episode (with screen shots and flow)

 


Now, for this podcaster, I have always used WordPress, and I have found it to be sufficiently adequate. Yes, there are a few flaws, as well as features that I wish that it had. But especially for the new and aspiring podcaster, this may be the proper tool at the right time. In fact, there was a tutorial on WordPress located in Udemy, the electronic catalog and learning site, which taught WordPress.

In fact, I am planning, writing the show notes and script, as well as doing the recording, editing and scheduling of this podcast episode in late February of 2021 — which is six months before this episode is scheduled to go live. How is that for scheduling an episode with some evergreen topics?

We hope that you can either learn from this episode and use the tools that are suggested, or that you can adapt WordPress to your own workflow and become a successful podcaster — and that scheduling your episodes will be something that will help you to become a better podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and medium.com and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

503- Podcasting simplicity for content creators and entrepreneurs

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a recent article that tried to describe resources that would make podcasting simple and easy for entrepreneurs (and content creators). The headline for this article from podnews.net is “Caproni: Podcast Publishing for entrepreneurs.”

So, investigating the content of this article, we find the claims that these resources (Caproni) would render “delightfully simple podcast publishing…” for a series of audiences (i.e., rebels, entrepreneurs, etc.) who have no time to learn and manage any tools,  and so growing and publishing a podcast can be done with “one easy use tool.”

Now, for this podcaster, I tend to be more skeptical, because for the past 15 years, I have seen announcements and press releases that have been claiming to be the “one-stop-easy-shop” for doing this. And every time I examined the tool, I was not only disappointed, but many times the tools left a sour taste in my mouth (and the claims were just marketing hype).

So, with this article in podnews.net, you can actually go to the link to get more information and a demo and actually sign up for a trial of the resources. The trial will last for 5 months or your fifth episode, which seems to be a reasonable time for testing.

The article not only lists some of the podcasts hosted on this platform, but also makes other claims with the section called “Batteries included podcast publishing” and the sub-section called “Sell ebooks, pdfs and digital goodies marketed via your podcast… because you get to keep all of what you make.”

How can this be? you may wonder.

Well, the article claims that “everything you need” is available to you, including:

  • “Publishing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts & more!
  •  Website on your own domain
  •  Analytics
  •  Unlimited podcasts
  •  Multiple login accounts
  •  Grow with referrals: Feature landing on Spring
  •  Publishing on YouTube: Feature landing on Spring
  •  Automated transcripts: Feature landing on Summer
  •  Full control via API Private Beta”

Of course, like all marketing promotions, the testimonials follow from their customers. And as for the pricing, you can choose to sign up for either $18 USD per month or $48 USD per month after your trial. And the quote that they have about acquiring the tools is: “If you love it, keep it. If not, we can migrate your podcast to the platform of your choice.”

Now, I myself would not have tried this, as I am not a journalist employee of a publishing company that does reviews for compensation nor do I have a column in either a hardcopy or electronic magazine.

However, for an aspiring or new podcaster, this may attract the eye of someone who desires simple, easy and powerful tools to assist in getting podcast shows up and running in the podosphere. And with a free trial of 5 episodes, you really do have enough time to see if the time savings for learning other tools is a great benefit for your own show.

However, for the seasoned podcaster who has his own workflow that really works well for today (and planning for improvements for tomorrow), this may be something to be investigated whenever there may be some free time available in the future — but possibly not a priority today, as there are other projects besides publishing (like planning, marketing, promotion, sales, development of new products and offerings and social media activities).

So I do applaud the creativity of the developers of these tools, but again, I strongly recommend that you check out some of the podcasters who give their testimonials on the site and see exactly where they are in their skills curve and determine for yourself if this is a good investment for you — because the most valuable and costly investment is that of YOUR TIME to acquire, install, learn, exercise and use the tools and then analyze the results in a cost-benefit analysis.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

535- Podcasting from facebook will only mean more censorship

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the horrid idea as reported on podnews.net of facebook going into podcasting. With their horrible past performance of censorship, this will mean the beginning of censorship and attempted de-platforming of content (as well as podcasters) in the podosphere. And if twitter tries this, also, then the podosphere will become infested with this malignant growth called censorship, deplatforming, woke and cancel culture. This will probably ruin the environment of free speech that now is the podosphere, and it will also begin to ruin the environment of the podosphere.

As of the reports from the podnews newsletter and podcast episode for April of 2021, there is not much detail about the infiltration of facebag into podcasting. There is much more to be aware of.

We shall be following this type of information about this attack on content in the podosphere from facebag, and we will freely speak and comment about our views on these happenings.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and podnews.net and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

478- Podcasting tips on audience development

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we discuss the theme of “audience development” from an earlier post in pacific-content.com called “What is audience development, anyway” by Jonas Woost.  This was from a link in an earlier post at podnews.net.

For new and aspiring podcasters, this topic may be of vital interest, because it tries to address a key success factor in audience reach. As Jonas mentions: “our Audience Development expertise is key to the success of our clients as it ensures we reach the intended listenership with each podcast.”


Now, this article delivers several key ideas for implementation and care. And after a key paragraph of describing the idea of “audience development,” Jonas gives the benefits of success in this area: “In other words, Audience Development is what brings listeners to a podcast, and it’s the job of the content to win these people over. Audience Development is crucial, but it needs to be combined with a solid and well-thought out editorial plan.”

Thus, Jonas then lists the best of these ideas — of which are the following:

  • The purpose of Audience Development;
  • The right audience
  • Podcast marketing
  • Research
  • Product packaging
  • Measurement
  • Distribution
  • The right time to work on Audience Development

For this reporter, the ideas and sub-topics covered in this article have got a good reason for being included in a podcast business plan or podcast marketing plan. Without them, you can easily find yourself diverted to another idea or create another podcast show when you have not even begun to see the “fruit of the podcast tree” come to life yet.

Having the discipline to know about these, plan these out and execute them in an organized manner (within your organizer or planner) can help you reach your goals quickly and measure your success.

However, many new and aspiring podcasters get caught up in the new excitement of publishing their podcast shows and forget that discipline is a key trait that can make your show successful. That is why we suggest that you attempt to spend some time in the planning of your show with these ideas in mind, before you go off and stray into the tempting world of creating yet another podcast show (because you found your first show so satisfying and exciting) — believe me, because I know that from my experience and the “school of hard knocks.” So, perhaps, Jonas’s advice can help you to get a step closer to a good podcast with proven success.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and blog.pacific-content.com and Jonas Woost. All rights reserved.

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podcast

464- Portcaster – Small portable podcast studio

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the announcement of what is called “the world’s most portable podcast studio” — aka the PortCaster. This is based on the post from indiegogo.com, and it appeared in the podnews.net newsletter recently.

The description of this podcasting device is:  “It’s designed for content creators, who record or live-stream to Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Twitch, and other platforms. It makes it easy to add music, sound effects and guests to your podcast or stream. About the size of a passport, this product is very portable, so it’s great for any type of recording, especially when traveling. It’s Made in USA and for a limited time it’s very affordable!”

After checking out the image photos in the indiegogo.com post, I was surprised at the versatility and the reach in podcasting and streaming by the detail and the image of some of the controls of such a device.


As is stated in the post, a key aspect of this device is to improve the sound quality. But it also has another purpose for your focus of your podcast:  “And that lets you focus on what matters — your content, your guests and your audience.”  And you can do this by the following:

  • livestreaming — i.e., gaming, vlogging and videography;
  • storytelling — i.e., podcasting, voiceover, broadcasting;
  • web meetings– i.e., lessons, seminars, conferences; and
  • worship service — i.e., streaming, recording, teaching.

With rechargeable batteries and the recording medium of an HC-SD card for capturing the content, this system allows your guests to be recorded over the phone. As you can see, the controls for the features look appealing to many podcasters who want this type of power and control while traveling on the road in a device as small “as a passport.”

Details are also given for recording local guests who may be next to you or in the same room or studio.

And the details of all these features are explained in a few sentences in the post that outlines the important aspects of the system. And at the post, you can see images and photos that point out all the ports and connectors and connections of this device, with a simple description of the key ones stressed.  In addition, comparison tables with other systems and detailed specifications are also delivered in the post, for your own comparison. Testimonials from musicians and other content creators, along with discounted prices for early adopters are shown. And finally, the timeline for availability in early 2021 is shown.

The most important aspect for many podcasters will lie in the price tags of $299.00 USD and $399.00 USD dollars.

The final part of the post goes into a brief explanation of some risks and challenges of this project and its availability.

Well, for this podcaster, the device seems to be priced quite competitively and contains a value-rich set of features that are highlighted by the sales promotional images contained in the post.

In fact, it reminds me of the days when the Zoom H2 device came out back in 2006-2007 with its feature-rich set of values for the portability of a small device that can fit into a shirt pocket and carry a great punch with a 32-GB HCSD card to run on AC power or batteries. Such was the technology boom for portability in podcasting then.

But for myself, I will wait until the final availability at the beginning of 2021, and for the reviews to come back from professional reviewers with objective descriptions such as Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting.

In the meantime, this seems to be a device that can appear to be “too good to be true” until the activities in the field of portable podcasting will test its utility and value for the portable podcasters that can use the livestreaming, storytelling and web meetings. Until then, I am surely glad that companies are exploiting new technologies to give us price-performance devices that can help podcasters in the future — especially the new and aspiring podcasters.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and indiegogo.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

427- Podcasts about podcasting

In this very brief episode of podcastreporter.com, we focus on a list of podcast shows whose subject is PODCASTING. This list was initially delivered in July of 2020 by Dave Jackson in his schoolofpodcasting.com site and was mentioned in various podcast episodes from him. In fact, the title of this list is “Podcasts about Podcasting — the never-ending list.”

When we look at the list, Dave has not only divided the entire list by different categories, but he also has let you know which of these shows is no longer active. He did this by striking a line through the title (e.g., the list has the podcast show of “Your Podcast Consultant” with the strike-through added.

As you will hear in this audio episode, the categories for the list include the following (and in the order in which they appear on the list):

  • Active “how-to” podcasts;
  • Podcasters being interviewed;
  • Occasional episodes; and
  • Shows on hiatus (podfaded),

We would like to mention that this show of The Podcast Reporter is listed in the first category of Active How-to Podcasts with the subject line of “Podcasting News.”

Now, this list has grown over the past 15 years under the watchful eye of Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting as a key podcaster and content creator. You see, in the early days of the podosphere in 2005 and following, the list was rather small, and all the podcasters with shows about podcasting could have been gathered together in person at the first Podcast and Portable Media Expo in Ontario, California, in 2005 and 2006.

So, as a reference for the media, as well as the new and aspiring (and even older and experienced) podcasters, this list can show how much the podcasting community has embraced those shows whose topic revolves around podcasting and the podosphere.

By the way, this list also received an honorable mention in a recent issue of the podnews.net newsletter.

So, if you want to keep on top  of the podcasting space, you may want to review the list and subscribe to some of these more active shows whose subjects may be of interest to you. And in this way, you can continue to be on top of your game in podcasting, as well as become knowledgeable in the podosphere as a content creator and podcaster. We hope that his list will provide you with yet another resource for your own knowledge, education and be of value to you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson from The School of Podcasting. All rights reserved.

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podcast

421- ID3 tags and their value

In this episode of PodcastReporter.com, we focus on an article in podnews.net called “Do ID3 Tags matter for Podcast SEO?”

Here, the issue is the VALUE of SEO (i.e., search engine optimization) for podcasters today, as opposed to the early days of the podosphere in 2004 when a lot of importance and emphasis we placed on ID3 tags in your podcast episodes.

As you will see in this article by James Cridland, the key question is whether or not today’s podcasters are using ID3 tags and whether or not it provides any value for your episodes or your podcast shows.


For this podcast reporter, the ID3 tags are still being included in each podcast episode. For myself, the value for the podcast show delivers some data for those players that allow the listener or those who download or consume to get more information about the show and the episode.

In summary, my perspective is this — an old podcaster mentor of mine (i.e., Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting) delivers for me the criteria for this decision:  “As Dave Jackson says, it’s worth still putting them into your files: because the 0.1% of people who still use their Rio mediaplayer might like to see it. Who knows, they might be useful in the future; and they should be done relatively automatically by your digital audio editor or podcast host.”

Now, in addition, if you listen to episode dated 11July2020 in Dave Jackon’s Ask The Podcast Coach show, you will hear some of the reasons why Dave still fills out and includes ID3 tags with each episode. Some of them are to prevent some regret if one of the big publishers decide to use them again in the near future (although today many of them have neglected ID3 tag file content).

For yourself, as a podcaster, you have to see if the ID3 tags are worth including or should they be ignored.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

397- Considerations in changing podcast formats

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on the topic of possibly changing the format of your podcast episodes. This theme was brought to us by an article by Dan Misener as stated in the podnews.net newsletter. In fact, this question was also asked by Evo Terra in his podcast show called Podcast Pontifications.

The features that may be targets for change are the time and length of the show (e.g., long-form to short-form, or micro-casting, etc.), the types of intros and outros, themes, music, calls-to-action, etc. These are things that you can adapt to your listeners based on the idea of getting away from the current stressful situation of the virus crisis.

We hope that you can examine and do the research needed to see  if you need to have a change in the format items of your podcast show. Hopefully, this will bring you more success in a more positive light.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and podnews.net and Dan Misener and Evo Terra of PodcastPontifications.com. All rights reserved.