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430- Podcasting lessons learned after 100 episodes

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on an article published recently and authored by Denis Murphy called “11 Lessons from 100 Podcast Episodes.”

The link given in the published article is from medium.com.

Now, as I have been podcasting for 15 years, this article interested me, for I have had over 18 podcast shows, and I have had nearly 2 million downloads. And I wanted to compare my lessons learned after some shows that have had nearly 500 episodes (both The Struggling Entrepreneur, as well as my current podcast show of The Podcast Reporter with over 430 episodes).

From this article, the 11 lessons learned are:

  1. Solo episodes;
  2. Reach out to potential guests more than once;
  3. Most podcasts don’t even get past 7 episodes;
  4. Most days you feel like an idiot;
  5. You reconnect with your real voice;
  6. Discover your why;
  7. Other people’s assumptions and experiences;
  8. Treat social media as an ongoing experiment;
  9. You don’t need to earn money;
  10. You don’t need a huge audience;
  11. A personal development vehicle.

And each section contains a couple of paragraphs to explain just what the learned lessons provided as value to Denis Murphy as the podcaster.


However, for this podcaster, I have learned many lessons since 2006 — and I keep on learning lessons from my involvement and participation in the podosphere still today, as well as the future.

In addition, I do take issue from my own experience with several of Murphy’s lessons — in particular, numbers 4, 9 and 10. That is,

  • I have NEVER felt like an idiot when I participated as a podcaster in the podosphere;
  • I have tried to earn money, and I have been successful as a profitable podcaster; and
  • I have grown a large audience in the podosphere, with nearly 2 million downloads.

Thus, if you, as a new or aspiring podcaster, want to get some best practices, I would go to another source to see what some of them are, in spite of Mr. Murphy’s personal lessons learned. One such podcast show that gives a lot of best practices is The Audacity to Podcast from Daniel J Lewis; another is The School of Podcasting from Dave Jackson; and one last show is The New Media Show from Todd Cochrane.

As a matter of fact, this episode is giving me some impetus to prepare and publish an episode in this show for the future that will deliver to my audience MY OWN lessons learned after over 1500 podcast episodes from all my shows. Keep watching this space for any news of this upcoming episode later this year.

We do suggest that you read this article from Mr.  Muphy, but then we recommend that you put together YOUR OWN list of lessons which you yourself have learned in any number of key podcast episodes which can mean value and importance to you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

425- Importance of podcast Scripts

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we focus on an article found in the July issue of medium.com that dealt with scripts in podcasting. The title of the article is “Scripting Down Your Podcast : How Important is it?”

In this article, the topic of the importance of podcast scripts is reviewed from the point of view of the value to the podcaster.

In the beginning of the article, the key factor articulated is that “Having a script will help you deliver your message in a more effective manner.”

Then the article delivers some tips to frame a great podcast script. In addition to creating a road map of your episode topics, the article also suggests that you maintain a conversational tone (and not an overly technical one), as well as leaving some room (or markers) for impromptu topics that will suggest spontaneity in your content. And although I, myself, do not recommend the following tip, the article suggests that you even indicate certain patterns of speech: “mark out the specific lines for pauses, laughs, emphasis, and sighs.”  (You see, for myself, these audio noises should be natural and sometimes spontaneous)

And finally, the article even includes some tips for quality scripting with a suggested podcast script template. This framework would give you the following areas of content for a “quality script”:

  • 1. Sponsor message
    2. Introduction
    3. Musical jingle/sound effects
  • 4. A longer explanation of what’s in store
    5. Topic 1
    – Main point
    – Supporting point
    – Supporting data
    – Supporting quote
    6. Segue
    7. Topic 2
    – Main point- Supporting point
    – Supporting data
    – Supporting quote
    8. Sponsor message
    9. Topic 3
    – Main point
    – Supporting point
    – Supporting data
    – Supporting quote
    10. Segue
    11. Outro
    12. Call to action
    13. Sponsor message
    14. Musical jingle/sound effect

And, as you can see, the detailed script becomes quite a template for production of a full episode.

Now, for this podcast reporter, I have done scripting like the above in the early days of my podcasting experience — back from 2006. However, with practice and experience, I have been able to break away from the chains of such a strict template to a brief outline or a detailed outline (depending upon the nature of the topic, the interviewee involved, and the amount of minutia or details concerned).

For the novice or new podcaster, or for the aspiring podcaster, the above template can give an idea to the podcaster of how much detailed work there is to plan for a quality podcast episode instead of just “winging it” or doing a “roll your own on the fly” episode.

However, perhaps your episode need not be so rigorous or strict or detailed. A good, solid outline can be a perfect substitute once your audio conversational skills are perfected, and when you can learn to be spontaneous with a guest, or when you can have enough background in your topic to go “off script” (as they say in the media).

Whichever method you choose, a script can be a good training tool. It can also be the foundation for creating good show notes and ensure that you have good skills in planning your podcast episodes. And perhaps you may want to create your own template — suited to your skills, your personality, your podcast show and your topics.

So we hope that your scripting skills can be improved and that your planning for your episodes will help make your podcast show successful in growing your audience and making loyal fans of your listeners.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and mediu.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

385- Fix podcasting discoverability issues

In this episode of podcastreporter.com, we discuss the issues of discoverability of your podcast shows, and especially how to try to fix them.

The post on medium.com deals with five ways to fix discoverability problems. These five thoughts are:

  • Realize that your problem is not unique;
  • Take the lead by getting in front of your audience and introduce yourself;
  • Go niche;
  • Raise the bar — for the only ones to suffer will be those podcasters who refuse to adapt;
  • Have patience

Thus, in addition to other resources already discussed in this podcast show, we hope that you can find value in these perspectives and begin to conquer the discoverability problem for your podcast show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and medium.com. All rights reserved.