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456- Refreshing your Podcast Brand

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a recent post by author, content creator and thought leader, Chris Brogan titled “Thoughts on refreshing a brand.” This post was sent to the distribution list for Chris Brogan’s followers, and it takes into account the nearly 20 years of experience that Chris has had in the space for content creators and authors — and for 15 years in the podosphere.

Thoughts on Refreshing a Brand

Over time, we’ve narrowed the concept down to 3-4 products total, and 3 total ways to buy.

The offerings:

  • Courses
  • Webinars
  • Group coaching
  • Private coaching

The way to buy:

  • Insider – subscription service everything (but the private coaching)
  • Unlimited – subscription service to the webinars only
  • Purchase – ownership of specific content, non subscription

And the pricing is “insanely affordable” (and he gives some examples of each).

But Chris felt the need to refresh the brand. In looking at his firm, Owner Media Group and its offerings, he realized that he had to polish up the offerings and look better for 2020 and beyond.

Thoughts on Refreshing a Brand

Chris then elaborates on the elements required to refresh a BRAND. They include:

  • Simplify
  • Clarify
  • Visuals
  • A Show – Not only does he discuss the Backpack Show , but he hints at the Modern Business Show as a media portion of what he will do at Owner.
  • More Touch (including the aspect of making the offerings easy to consume);
  • Better Outreach.
  • Anchoring

What is required for Chris is something “so that the brand feels new again, useful, pertinent, and valuable to you.” In this way, he feels that a business — or a podcast — can be REFRESHED.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation . All rights reserved.

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podcast

437- What we have learned so far … Chris Brogan

In this episode, we focus on some thoughts that were delivered to us by a thought leader, Chris Brogan, in an email from his subscription list. The mail was dated 9 August 2020, and the subject was: “What we’ve learned so far.”

In addition, as one of the earliest podcasters in 2004 and 2005, he was one of the four founders of the podcamp events, which are barcamp-style inbound conferences that had several good ideas — among them, no fees for everyone, and all people were participants and not attendees, and that anyone could present and share without having to be in a psuedo-elite class.

Because I have known Chris since 2010 in our in-person meeting (and since 2007 in various podcamps and other podcast meetings and entrepreneur venues), I thought that his words-of-wisdom may be beneficial for both podcasters and entrepreneurs.


My dealings with Chris Brogan

The last time I met in person with Chris was in 2014 at the initial Podcast Movement conference in Dallas, in which he was the keynote speaker to kick off the first ever conference of this type (which is still going strong, with a virtual conference scheduled for October).

Before then, I had actually had an interview with him and Julien Smith, as co-authors of the book, Trust Agents. And we discussed the plights and tribulations and benefits that faced the entrepreneur at the time. In fact, I did record the interview, and it was published in PodcastReporter.com as a bonus episode on 28September2009.

And when it came time for him to be the keynote speaker of the very first Podcast Movement conference event in 2014, I was there with him to get his ideas for entrepreneur and podcaster success factors. So I did manage to corral him in a corner of the conference during a few moments which he did not have scheduled in a break-out or session, and I managed to get an interview at the Podcast Movement Conference in 2014:

The latter was known as episode # 12 of this show.


Now, sometimes the original text of a short email and what is said is much more important than a summary or an abridged edition. In this case, I felt that for the entrepreneur and podcaster to get the maximum benefit of this conversation, it would be best to deliver the entire message from Chris. And knowing him personally as I do (and, yes, I have purchased some of his webinars and offers from him before), I know that the would not mind for me to share these words with you. And if you find this of value, you may want to go to his web site and subscribe, or go to his YouTube channel of The BackPack

And there, you can also subscribe to his video channel and latest delivery of information.


“What we’ve learned so far…”

And here is the email letter that was sent out by Chris Brogan to his network of subscribers on 9 August 2020:

“All the world’s a stage, Fred.

Seems that way in pandemic-ville, doesn’t it? Endless Zoom calls (remember Skype?), and every speaker and podcaster friend I know getting back into video. It’s a very visual world for some.

I launched The Backpack Show originally to be a way to just connect and stay in touch. A …point of contact. Then, I shifted it to be a way to …catch up. Then, I knew I wanted to do it even better, so I brought Kerry O’Shea Gorgone in as consiglieri and co-host, and that’s the show.

Last week, I talked about the graphics changing the world. I thought I’d share some more learnings from the show as they apply to YOUR business and how to promote.

Steal These Learnings

Package – the ads and graphics conversation from last week covers this. You need visuals to really pop the projects you work on. Naming something is good. LABELING it is better.

Guide The Community – doing the Backpack Show for a little while now, it’s easy to feel like everyone’s been there to see every episode. There’s always someone new, so be crisp in guiding people through every experience. “It’s a business show, but with morning show energy” is one of our taglines because we’re setting the stage for what to expect. Do this often.

Promote – we’re getting ready to do a few Facebook ads to see if that pumps the numbers. Feels like it will. For as much as I ever tweet, or if Kerry tweets, that still drives very little traffic. If the guest shares the show with their community, the show pops.

Go Beyond – our guest list over the last few weeks and upcoming shows:

  • Mountain climber
  • Former pro football player/CEO
  • Professional comedians (2)
  • Magician/Positioning Expert
  • Broadway actor/singers (2)
  • The voice of Siri
  • NASCAR driver
  • Pro wrestler
  • YouTube celebrities (2)
  • Poop doctor
  • Chef
  • Adult film star and model
  • Futurists (2)

What’s interesting is that every time we invite one of our marketing or sales or business peers or friends, the results of attendance are mixed. Fewer views and less engagement for people in my same industry. Much more attendance and energy around the more unique guests.

Unknown is whether the perceived value of attending one type of show versus another changes. If you learn something from Daniel Pink or whoever, does it matter if fewer people see it than Scotland’s darling Janey Godley (who had 100x more views)?

Community-Driven – you know me. Everything I do has a massive community element. The show has live comments. We just launched a show email. We talk to guests and the community all the time on places like Twitter. Even more gratifying is we see people reach out and embrace our guests and thus expand those people’s communities even more. Threading together good people is the primary driving force behind how we execute the show.

Worth Checking Out / Thinking About

Not directly related to the show, but maybe so, it’s worth thinking about a few details:

  • People are consuming more video every day.
  • Very short form (sub 1 minute) and long form (over 30 minutes) seem to be the highest growth categories.
  • Instagram continues to gain attention share away from Twitter, Facebook, and the other social networks.
  • Email marketing is still the best platform for people hoping to do business with people and not just entertain.
  • People continue to make the transition from laptops/desktops to mobile-only computing/device usage. It’s a mobile world. Plan your business around that.

Finally – It’s the Work

You have what you sell and all that entails, but this – *waves hands around* – is also the work. Make content that engages. Connect with people around that content. It’s an easy model:

Content — Community — Marketplace

Build content that attracts people

Nurture those people into a community you serve

Articulate a marketplace that serves that community

That’s your work. Not just being good at your job. Not just running your company. It must be visible. And very very reinforced through repetition.

Are you ready for that?

Chris…”


We hope that these words from Chris Brogan may help to strengthen your resolve to succeed, in spite of the “Plandemic” and fearmongering and mask-debates going on during the virus crisis.

We hope that you can reflect on what you have learned so far, and that this will help to get you aimed at the targets of not only where you will want to go in the near future, but the success targets that you will have to learn in the coming months and years.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Chris Brogan. All rights reserved.

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podcast

412- Podcaster path to becoming a Thought Leader

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the four steps in the path of becoming a thought leader. This was initiated in an episode by Paul Colligan in his podcast show called The Podcast Report.

As you will hear in this audio episode, we describe each of four steps of the podcaster or new media content creator in becoming a recognized THOUGHT LEADER.

We also refer to a book by John Jantsch called “The Referral Engine” to become a solution provider and trusted advisor.

In addition an example of a trusted advisor is Lon Naylor of ScreenCaptureVideo.com in the area of screencasts and video training with both Camtasia Studio and PowerPoint by Microsoft.

And finally, an example of successful thought leadership is that of Chris Brogan, who is a podcaster, course designer and author of various books (such as Trust Agents, with co-author Julien Smith) on business relationships and success. Becoming recognized as a thought leader will result in receiving invitations to be a keynote speaker in certain inbound and virtual conferences for podcasting.

In addition, Paul Colligan is another example of a podcasting thought leader.

So we hope that this content can help you set your objective to become a podcasting thought leader and make your business a success.

Copyright (c) 2020, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Paul Colligan and Chris Brogan and John Jantsch and Lon Naylor. All rights reserved.