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podcast

587- Disruption technology in Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of “disruption” activities and promotions and projects. In particular, we deliver a repurposed podcast episode from Tom Schwab of the program  Interview Valet, where we look at the “disruption technology.”

Also, we owe some credit to Evo Terra (podcaster of today’s show called  podcastpontifications.com) when he discussed with us what it is like to be a “podcaster disrupter.” And we plan to include that earlier repurposed interview in a later episode of this show. Evo felt that the “next big thing” in podcasting would come from a supportive “disruption” of the podosphere.

Now, as I mentioned before in this podcast series, I have known Evo when I met him in person in 2007, and also when I had strengthened my relationship with him, both in person and when I had interviewed him on my podcast shows since 2007.

In one interview episode, I had Evo tell us how and why he described  himself as a disrupter. This was both for being an entrepreneur and a podcaster.


Then, later, I had interviewed Tom Schwab of the Interview Valet program, where he was also noted as a “disrupter” in podcasting, as he was one of the first to publicly announce that he was NOT going to do a podcast, but rather, he would pursue his success in being a podcast GUEST. He announced this at the second Podcast Movement conference in 2015 at Fort Worth, Texas. And he later provided others with a business model that would help podcasters gain success in their shows by being a guest on other podcasters’ podcast shows.

As a matter of fact, we have the original interview from 2015 where Tom describes his business and his “disruption” of the podcast interview processes:

As you can hear from this repurposed episode, Tom describes his “disruption” in business and podcasting from the entrepreneurial side in the following summarized manner:

  • “Disrupted technology” that supports the pursuit of being a podcast guest (e.g., being and interviewee) as opposed to being the interviewer to lead the conversation on a podcaster’s own show;
  • Repeating someone else’s success may not be the best model to follow for success — in other words, do NOT be a “me-too” product;
  • Being a disrupter incorporates new models of how to do business as an entrepreneur, as well as a podcaster — but not by total imitation of someone else’s successful results (in particular, to avoid naming your show with the “on fire” suffix);
  • How to go about getting YOU as one of your prospects from being listener to being visitor and have you be welcomed to a tailored, individual welcome site for just YOU;
  • His “disruption” includes renaming some of the terms used in sites (e.g., a “welcome” page instead of a “landing page” or “squeeze page”) to make it more personal.
  • His disruption will be in the form of creating VISITORS and not to provide them with podcast audio episodes — but rather have them listen to yourself as a guest and then get them interested in your programs;
  • Monetization can also be incorporated in your business, as you can refer to his book, “Podcast Guest Profits: Grow your business with a targeted interview strategy.”
  • He currently has moved to interactive webinars (mostly free) to promote his program and the successes of podcast-guesting.

So, as one of the very first programs to emphasize being a podcast guest instead of a podcast interviewer, Tom has been flexible to adapt new methods for his success and his business.

We hope that this model of disruption may be of benefit to you as you shape your podcasting model for your show, or adapting parts of this to make your business more profitable and more successful.

So, later, we will deliver the repurposed episode from Evo Terra where he speaks to us earlier about plotting his way and pivoting to become a “disrupter” in the podosphere.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Tom Schwab and Evo Terra. All rights reserved.

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podcast

586- Mastering your craft of podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we relate to you a set of podcast episodes, delivered during the week of September 20-24, 2021, that deal with the topic of improving your podcast show, as well as improving your “craft” of podcasting. These episodes were published in the podcast show by Evo Terra called Podcast Pontifications.

And what I would suggest is that this may be a good start for an actual project that you may want to plan and begin to better yourself as a podcaster, as well as learn some great techniques to improve the quality of your podcast shows.

Now, I have known Evo Terra since 2006, and I had met him in person when he attended one of my sessions which I delivered at the first Podcamp in Arizona in 2007 (when I spoke about podcast improvement for monetization and delivery). I had also interviewed Evo several times during the past 16 years on this show about his contribution as a “disrupter” of the status quo (for the beneficial reason of improvement of the craft and not just for the sake of doing away with the current workflows for podcasters). And Evo has a lot of suggestions that do provide value to both the new and aspiring podcasters, as well as to the professional podcasters.

So, in reviewing the suggestions and topics and products and other deliverables mentioned by Evo in his several episodes that centered around the theme of “improving your craft” to become a better professional podcaster (and not just a newbie), I also found myself noticing that much of the improvement can come from increasing your skills as a story-teller and a planner of content. However, this content goes beyond just podcasting show notes and blogs — it also dealt with how you can improve your craft by taking tips and suggestions from other types of media (including the press and books and narrations).

So I would suggest that you consume the content for these 4 episodes that Evo has published and see if the resources mentioned and the tips that are given can add to your professionalism in building a better podcast — especially if you have a business podcast.

Some of these are the following (and this is a non-inclusive list):

  • Make your podcast education a continuing education program and be SERIOUS about it by planning and budgeting for both time and money to include the knowledge that will make you better in the area of CONTENT CREATION AND MEDIA;
  • Resources that deliver training and workshops that can help you to improve your game in podcasting (he cites 6);
  • Looking to the Podcast Academy for insight and knowledge from others in the podosphere for inspiration; and
  • 5 resources to “help you think like a SERIOUS podcaster.”

Although some of these resources mentioned and the roads suggested may have some financial costs, it is up to you to investigate how they can help you — after all, they are suggested by someone who has been a center of podcasting for over 16 years in the podosphere and has written some of the first books on podcasting.

So, for this short episode, we hope that you can evaluate if these resources and suggestions will help you to “improve your craft” of podcasting (and not just the mechanical part or the recording or editing part) in ALL areas of content creation, publication and distribution. If so, then you can, indeed, better yourself as a professional podcaster and as Evo says, “MASTER YOUR CRAFT OF PODCASTING.” And this can help you lead your business and podcasts to success.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Evo Terra of podcastpontifications.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

585- Tips for increasing Podcast listeners

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a past post by Ben Krueger, podcaster for cashflowpodcasting.com, that deals with the 16-year-old topic of “How to increase podcast listeners.”

Now, I have known Ben Krueger personally since I had shared a booth with him in the exhibit hall of the very first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas, Texas, in 2014. And I do respect Ben in what he posts and his suggestions for improving your podcasting careers — but mainly for new and aspiring podcasters.

Ben Krueger

Now, in this post, Ben answers the question of how a podcaster can increase the listeners to his podcast show. And Ben provides for us this evergreen topic in this post.

Now, the age-old question of how to increase listeners has been addressed from a myriad of podcasters, including the “old faithful” of experienced podcasters — from Dave Jackson, Rob Walch, Paul Colligan, Daniel J Lewis, Todd Cochrane and others. In fact, I, myself had given seminars and courses and classes in person at various conferences and podcamps in the past 16 years to address this topic. So, in my opinion, there may be some new items to address recent areas of the podosphere with new tools — but, all in all, this question has been beaten up totally, although it is a question still for podcasters everywhere. And Ben gives this post the attention it deserves, lest we forget all the hints of increasing your listener base.


Now, Ben summarizes the key elements for podcast listener increases at the beginning of his post with the objectives and understanding that podcasters must have when analyzing podcast listenership:  “If you want to get more podcast listeners, you should start by focusing on creating content for a clearly niche and then building out a marketing strategy. This marketing strategy will ensure those who can extract value from your content are fully aware of its existence. To know how to increase podcast listeners, you must understand where your target audience is spending their time.”

So, in this post, Ben then addresses these topics, with details for each one of  these areas:

  • Where can I promote my podcast?
  • How can I then promote my business podcast show?
  • How can my podcast make money (including advertising)?
  • How do podcasts go viral?
  • How many listeners are good for a podcast?
  • What is good podcast growth? (Remember: “Podcast growth is the scale at which your audience continues to expand over time.”)
  • How do I make my podcast successful?
  • Why do podcasts fail?

And the summary of action items can be rolled up into the words of wisdom by Ben at the end of his post: “With the right approach, attracting new listeners to your podcast can be remarkably easy. It’s all about experimentation and testing different marketing channels to see what forms of marketing resonate with your target audience.”


So you have to be willing to test your actions in podcasting and publication — as well as the beginning steps of planning, marketing, promoting and creating episodes in your show that PROVIDE VALUE to the listeners.

So we hope that the topics and the details for these ideas can fill in some of the gaps and try to answer some questions and ideas you may have about growing and increasing your numbers of listeners to your show, and thus help your podcast show to be more successful in those areas.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaealandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

584- Possible aimlessness in your Podcasting business

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of a Podcaster’s dealing with aimlessness, in spite of what could be viewed as a successful podcasting business at the time of evaluation.

In order to do this, we refer to a podcast episode from Todd Henry’s show called The Accidental Creative.

Now, for a small business owner or entrepreneur or professional podcaster that has an outward appearance of having success at the moment, the feeling of “aimlessness” can begin to erode the confidence of your work and your duties, and it can start to allow the feelings of stagnation, fear of failure, a loss of purpose, and others.

What is aimlessness for the entrepreneur?

As Todd explains: “A lack of a clear through-line in your work — a lack of the overreaching “WHY” within your work or your commitment to your tasks for reaching success. When there is little connection between the core why of your work, it is difficult for you to do your best work ” and reach a satisfaction result from your work and results.

And this is true, even difficult, when you are doing the work that you may really love — Todd explains this, and I must say that this also applies to professional podcasters who are totally committed to their work and love what they do. The aimlessness is like an asymptomatic virus that attacks our soul and our spirit to prevent you from reaching your goals for your business and doing your best work. Sometimes, it can even lead to have little or no hope in deadlines and lack of appreciation for your tasks and results of your accomplishments (and even delay them).

Todd continues: “When you succeed, you can still feel hollow when you have accidental success, if there is not any intended purpose behind it.”

To overcome this, you still need good strategies in order to get to the final result of “victory” for your work, instead of futility. “Aimlessness can be destructive, removing the joy of success and the gratification resulting from your hard work.”

Aimlessness does not have cohesion between yourself and your work. You can start to feel this way when you recognize the early symptoms of certain states — like burnout, for instance.


Now, Todd addresses this issue with some strategies in defining your battles and aligning yourself to fight your opposing forces to make progress. And he sets these strategies within the framework of “passion”  (and he correctly defines what real passion within your work is about). And more importantly, he explains about “productive passion.”


We recommend that you consume this episode to see if the strategies explained can be meaningful to you, your work and your business. He explains how you can discover this “productive passion” — especially if you want a small workbook which he offers from his web site to walk yourself through his strategies — with the following ideas:

  • understand the theory of “compassionate anger”;
  • what moves you emotionally?
  • what obsesses you (i.e., “the splinter in your mind”)?

So, we hope that you can identify your current productive passion and find value from Todd’s episode as described here. In this way, you can see if there is a possible road to aimlessness in your current situation and work, especially if you realize that you have not been spending your hours in good time/energy focus. We sincerely wish for you the best in getting your business on the road to success, especially when discovering and overcoming aimlessness.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Todd Henry from theaccidentalcreative.com. All rights reserved.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Todd Henry. All rights reserved.

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podcast

582- Recording a Podcast episode on Skype

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme that is over 15 years old — that of using Skype to record a podcast episode.

This theme brought back very old memories for myself, as I had been using Skype since 2006. And it was included in the post delivered by Ben Krueger at cashflowpodcasting.com. Now, since I have personally known Ben since 2014 and trusted him with coming up for podcasters with value deliverables and suggestions, I was interested to see about this older method of doing remote interviews and capturing audio.

My own podcasting history with Skype

Since 2005, I have been involved with the podosphere, and for over 16 years, I have been a podcaster with many of my shows including the format of remote interviews — and most of them using Skype.

My experience with the earlier versions of Skype was very dismal — it took quite a few hours to get the configuration right so that it worked. And there was an application program that provided for capturing and creating the audio for recorded interviews — PowerGramo (which is no longer available). And like other competitors at the time, one configuration of PowerGramo allowed for each of the 2 podcasters on the remote interview to be recorded on a separate track. This was wonderful and allowed slight synchronization and slight editing to get the tracks ready to save and add other content (like music and intros, etc.). Of course, this was a paid application (one-time charge) and it proved very reliable.

And the benefit was that I could also pay for an additional service from Skype called “Skype-out” — this allowed me to “dial” into analog phones or cell phones in addition to “dialing” into another Skype user via the internet. Thus, when doing an interview with someone who considered himself “low tech,” my interviewee would not have to deal with Skype (if the interviewee did not have it installed and configured for his use). This was a great benefit, as I could schedule and conduct interviews over the telephone without any problem (except using software like early versions of Izotope or Levelator  (as well as other software like Auphonic) to try and correct problems with the audio).

And finally, there was another configuration of Skype for the reverse, called Skype-In. However, for my own situation, I was the main initiator for an interview, and I did not require this at all.

But when Skype was acquired by Microsoft, my old application that worked as a Skype add-on (which was PowerGramo) no longer worked at all — and PowerGramo soon was retired after that. And then the configuring of Microsoft’s Skype became such a jumble of “electronic spaghetti” that I gave up in frustration in using my “old faithful” combination of Skype and PowerGramo. Instead, I sought out and sparingly used other applications like Evaer, etc., to do remote recordings and capturing the interviewee’s audio — but it was really not a good substitute for the PowerGramo app (RIP). And so I reverted back to my trusted double-ender method to record podcasts, even though I had to deal most of the work for both editing, finalizing mp3 files and synchronization to create the golden mp3 file.

And to this day, I have relied on the double-ender for interviews — which basically limits my current interviews to other podcasters.


Ben Krueger on recording a podcast on Skype

In the 2021 post by Ben Krueger, the theme of using Skype is discussed in detail by Ben with his declaration that he would “be breaking down everything you need to know about how to record a podcast on Skype.”

In addition to having a properly configured Skype program on your PC, you will need to have properly configured call-recording software to create an audio file from the interview or discussion (remember, I had used the older program, PowerGramo, as my call-recording software). Ben gives examples with Ecamm Call Recorder and also  GarageBandAudition, or Audacity. He also mentioned  Piezo by Rogue Amoeba. He also mentions Audio Hijack.

He continues “If you have a PC, you will want to use the professional version of Pamela for Skype.”

Also, the topic of using Zoom comes up when trying to record a podcast by using the in-built recording feature. And then he highlights a tip for creating video: “Even though you may not see an immediate use for the video content, you should record it regardless. Further down the line, you may want to leverage the video content from your recordings on platforms like YouTube and Instagram.”


So these tips may be good for you to try to prepare remote interviewing, and Skype may or may not be the best choice for you as a podcaster. If you want to try Skype for remote audio capture, then I would suggest that you consume this post with all the details that Ben gives you.

And remember that a double-ender is still a great solution when you are interviewing a remote podcaster. It may seem like more work. But the creation of your audio file, downloading your interviewee’s audio file, synchronizing both tracks of audio, adding your music, intros, outros, and other content (like bumpers, etc.) may well be worth it — for you can form a good workflow for you to have a great-sounding interview of episode with your co-host.

I will continue to rely on my double-enders and only use Evaer as remote recording software when needed to capture the remote interviewee when the double-ender is really not an option.

I hope that you, as a podcaster, can decide if Skype is for you, along with all the other options mentioned above. Whatever the case, I wish you success in creating a smooth workflow that works for YOU, and that your remote interview or co-host episodes will add to your success for your show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

578- The craft of podcast story-telling

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some themes from Evo Terra in his podcastpontifications.com podcast show — in particular, why podcasters may not consider themselves as good story-tellers and learning the craft of story-telling.

In his recent episode where he discusses story telling, Evo tackles the self-imposed limitation that podcasters may have when they believe that their story-telling expertise is not good enough for podcasting — and the possibility of being “out-podcasted” by a good story teller. He states: “But not every podcaster is as confident in their storytelling abilities. Many struggle with storytelling on their shows, either because they have an actual deficiency when it comes to storytelling or because of that pesky imposter syndrome that won’t shut up as it tries to convince competent, capable podcasters that they’re worse at storytelling than they really are.”

Evo does have a few suggestions that have worked for him to master his craft of telling stories:

  • become an avid reader;
  • listen to podcasts that tell stories;
  • use the OUTLINE method to get a draft of the story you wish to tell, and then refine it with good story-telling materials and tools;
  • keep some stories “in your back pocket” just in case you need to bring one up and relate it when you are being interviewed or recorded in a podcast;
  • Practice the craft of telling stories constantly (and for many episodes) in your show: “As with any skill, you have to practice. Yes, even those who have mastered their craft—regardless of what that craft is—have to practice.”
  • Practice speaking your story out loud, as this is one way that it helped Evo to internalize story-telling;
  • Move your mindset to positive telling of stories to others.

For this podcaster, I have studied the art of story-telling, as my studies in my college undergraduate work was in writing for television and film — and story-telling was a key part of learning the craft. And always, the feedback is most important.

However, as a podcaster, mixing the story telling with the fact-based narration or deconstruction of events and situations is also something that is learned over time with much work and practice. And I would suggest that outlines and the writing of good show notes for your episodes would also be a major boost in perfecting your story-telling abilities — and your listeners will be able to comment on that more positively than other podcasters who become critical (and sometimes for the sake of just being critical of other podcasters).

Thus, I would suggest that you listen to the episode about story telling from the August, 2021, episode from Evo Terra in his podcastpontifications.com show and then review your own methods and workflow and processes and tactics that you may now use in story telling — and improve on them or incorporate new ones for your show.

I agree with what he says that your podcast show will “out-podcast” other shows when you tell good stories in your content and deliver that kind of value to your listeners.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Evo Terra of podcastpontifications.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

576- Podcast skills today may not sustain you tomorrow

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of podcast skills and the perspective of Todd Henry, podcaster of The Accidental Creative and also The Daily Creative.

Todd has spent a great deal of time in letting us know that we have to keep “sharpening the saw” (an expression used by Steven Covey in his book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People) which means that we need to sharpen our skills continuously, as well as do up-front key planning for success.

And Todd gives us food for thought in this famous quote from Pablo Picasso:  “I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it.”

And the key idea that is the take-away from Todd’s micro-episode is: “The skill that you are known for today will be unlikely to sustain you tomorrow. You must continue to grow.”


And we learn the podcasting craft and then come into our own genius in podcasting after much experience — from imitating others to get the experience, then diverging and delivering our own style, framework and VOICE in the podosphere (because we now have learned what works for us due to our growth). Todd can contemplate success when we experience making a “unique mark” and delivering a “unique contribution” in the podosphere.

Sound familiar?

Well, Todd then throws a bit of reality as he splashes the waters of realism in our face — we will hit what he calls “the crisis phase.” And he describes this phase in this manner:  But, then we hit what I call “crisis” phase. This is when we suddenly realize that the work is fine, that it’s delivering on expectations, and that everyone around us seems happy with what we’re doing, but we feel stuck. We’re doing what we’ve always done, and we’re doing it well, but we know that we are no longer growing.”

Now, does that sound familiar?

So before we can stagnate and start to get nervous about our future growth, Todd suggests that an avenue of growth may lie in going down the road of learning and in building your skill — in fact, building a new skill: Then, you will be able to incorporate it into your existing work and use it to find new ways of accomplishing your goals.”

For the creative podcaster, this is the inspiration that comes with skills transfer or skills-learning that can invigorate you as a content creator and skilled professional.

And it is up to each one of us as podcasters to go beyond our limits and see which new skills we can learn (or adopt) or internalize so that we can go beyond our limits today and have what we need to grow our craft and sustain us tomorrow.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Todd Henry. All rights reserved.

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podcast

615- BONUS- Update Interview with Dave Jackson at PM 2022 Evolutions

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we deliver an interview with Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting show while he was winding down his participation at the Podcast Movement Evolutions 2022 conference in Los Angeles.

As you will hear in this 40-minute episode, Dave delivers a report as a “boots-on-the-ground” demonstrator and exhibitor at the Podcast Movement Evolutions 2022 conference, including:

  • his thoughts on the nature of the show and audiences;
  • his perspectives of new announcements and innovations;
  • his vision of the future of the Podcast Movement conferences; and
  • a bit about his own future and participation in the podosphere as an author, a podcaster, a tech support personnel at Libsyn and a podcast consultant.

We hope that you enjoy the interview. We think that you can get a lot out of this, especially if you could not attend the conference — either in person or as a virtual attendee.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson of schoolofpodcasting.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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575- Podcasting boldness and bravery

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss  the theme of the mindset of the arrogance  vs the leadership quality of contemplation and possible change or pivoting. This deals with the brash boldness  that leads to a type of cowardice by not wanting to communicate vs. the bravery of the critical thinking that knows how to communicate and LISTEN — and how this can make the difference sometimes between success and failure for our own podcast shows.

We get this theme from the episode of the podcast show called The Accidental Creative by Todd Henry, where the topic is called “Bold vs. Brave Work, and 3 Elements of Brilliance.”


In Todd’s recent episode from The Accidental Creative, we get examples of brash boldness — i.e., the stubborn and tyrannical type of leader that decides which direction to take (and it may be against conventional wisdom or even contrary to any suggestions that formal or informal advisers may give that individual). A clear example of this can be as exaggerated as Adolf Hitler in WWII, when he refused to even listen to his advisers and generals (especially toward the end of the war), mainly because he felt he was history’s greatest military strategist with his past conquests. And in today’s modern environments, it could be the age-old leader that literally flies by the seat of his pants (i.e., his “gut feel” that made him successful, in spite of his own wrong decisions and actions). This type of individual would not listen to anyone — in fact, that individual would be most comfortable in dictating orders and activities, regardless of the possible outcomes or even against advice that was given with data and logic to back it up.

However, today, the element of bravery would command the element of communication and listening to advisers, studying the past and logic in making decisions and steering directions for your business.

As Todd elaborates in his podcast episode:

“This week’s podcast episode is about the distinction between boldness and bravery.

  • Bold leaders speak in declaratives, while brave leaders are willing to wade through the discomfort of seeing nuance.
  • Bold leaders identify scapegoats as the source of their problems, while brave leaders take accountability for their own thoughts and actions.
  • Bold leaders scream against events happening in their circle of concern, while brave leaders focus on what’s in their own circle of influence.
  • Bold leaders listen to what they want to hear, brave leaders listen to what they need to hear and are willing to change their mind when confronted with new information.

In the face of uncertainty and chaos, it’s tempting to act with boldness, but now more than ever our world needs bravery.”


As a podcaster, you may want to continue with the old ways of putting together your podcast episode and moving your show in the same direction that you have been doing so for the past 16 years (for those of us who started podcasting in 2005-2006). Since your processes and your practices have worked well until today, this may seem like the “safe” way to proceed. And you may consider doing the same without thinking about changing or modifying your show, because things have been fine so far. In this case, perhaps you may be acting like a  podcaster with boldness. Others may even use the term “conventional wisdom” when describing you.

However, a brave podcaster may want to learn about new tools, new processes, new procedures and even experiment and test new ideas to see if he can improve his podcast show. He may seek the feedback for some newer ideas on workflow or methods from some pundits or some colleagues that may help to make his podcasting better (which is the mantra delivered by age-old podcaster and disrupter, Evo Terra of podcastpontifications.com).

So, we recommend that you should try to pause before implementing some processes and procedures and determine if you may be acting like a bold or brave podcaster — and then perform the cost-benefit analysis for trying to extrapolate the possible results for your show, to see if they will bring your podcast show success.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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614- BONUS- Preparing for PM Evolutions 2022 conference

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter show, we deliver our plans to check out Podcast Movement Evolutions 2022 conference in Los Angeles, California, in late March, 2022.

Now, I have been an advocate and supporter or the conference since its inception in 2014 by Hall-of-Fame podcaster, Gary Leland. In addition to contributing to the crowdfunding program, I was also a speaker at this Dallas event.

In addition, the last podcast conference in which I did present was in Las Vegas in 2015 at the New Media Expo. My session was about podcasting for service groups and non-profit organizations.


But for this event, I will be taking a page out of the book of Dave Jackson of The School of Podcasting. What he did in 2013 at the New Media Expo was NOT purchase a ticket to be an attendee or presenter; rather, he stood outside the exhibit hall and other areas where you needed a badge to enter. In those days, there were more events that were open to everyone — such as keynotes, speed-interviews, etc., where anyone could attend. So Dave told me in an interview during that show in Las Vegas that he got more out of being a non-presenter or a non-attendee in person. He said that having all this free time enabled him to meet people in the hall and outside the exhibit hall and renew older relationships or generate new relationships, as well as do interviews and get the “buzz” from the attendees that did want to meet him in person.

So I will do the same at this conference, to the extent that it is limited. I do plan to meet with Dave Jackson, as I had scheduled to be with him ahead of time — and we can do an interview in the lobby or the restaurant or coffee shop of the hotel. I hope to schedule the same with pundits such as Paul Colligan, Todd Cochrane, Rob Greenlee, Rob Walch, Gordon Firemark and others. We shall see.

But of all the interviews that I perform, we hope to deliver to you interesting trends and directions of podcasting, as well as new innovations that will be interesting for you, my audience.

Thus, stay tuned for upcoming bonus episodes that will deliver to you the information from the Podcast Movement Evolutions 2022 conference.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and PodcastMovement.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.