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podcast

580- Podcast show live streaming and show notes summit

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss and give a very high-level overview and review of two programs from our podcasters recently.

One was from Dave Jackson’s Ask the Podcast Coach show (co-hosted with Jim Collison of TheAverageGuy.tv); and the other was an educational webinar called The Show Notes Summit.

First, we review some comments (that some of the purist grumps will enjoy criticizing) in the live streaming and tech environments of podcasting. In the tech area, we experienced the pros and cons of the live streaming tool called riverside, which was used in a recent live podcast episode of Ask the Podcast Coach from Dave Jackson and Jim Collison. The poor video and audio quality was only surpassed when the system knocked you off and had to re-initialized.

This comment was echoed over and over again in the chat room (or “troll room,” if you will). It was even echoed in the discussion by myself and co-host Matt Cox (who is a co-host for 2030podcast.com and grumpyoldbears.com).

Comment is: bring back the quality live streaming with YouTube, as they had before.

My opinion was that the sad part about this “experiment” was that the co-hosts for Askthepodcastcoach.com did NOT warn the listeners ahead of time that there was an experimental session that would use a new tool for the session. And, yes, some listeners and viewers were left out, due to technical and other problems. So several listeners were left out — and there was, in my view, no reason why this had to happen without warning.

Now, would I, as a podcaster, use this for live streaming?

No, never — not on your life, as I had to painfully experience the poor audio and video on this stream. Enough said.


Another theme was the live webinar with Daniel J Lewis and Steve Stewart that dealt with show notes for episodes (yes, the Grumps probably did not enjoy paying the $9 USD fee for live attendance, mainly because grumps like only FREE webinars with no charge).

It was called the Show Notes Summit.

But, in my opinion, it was worth it.

Our view is that webinars like this are ideal for learning and communicating with the ideal group of like-minded individuals.

Why?

  • it goes no longer than 4 hours and many speakers that deliver value;
  • there is a live chat room that becomes very lively and helpful for issues that are brought up during the presentations;
  • there is a question/answer session at the end of each presentation, and it does not go longer than just a few minutes;
  • there was a choice that could have been made by a live attendee of the presentations, where for an additional $40 allows the individual to get the replay videos, charts, membership in  a slack group for community sharing and other premium deliverables.
  • there are great presenters and instructors, such as Daniel J Lewis, who gave a new view and approach in creating better show notes.

This whole webinar was a positive step for education, training and learning about creating and delivering show notes for podcast episodes — mainly due to the leadership of Steve Stewart, a podcaster and master of editing (i.e., he runs the Podcast Editor Academy).

And, in our opinion, the best session was delivered by award-winning podcaster, Daniel J Lewis (who has a show called The Audacity to Podcast, as well as other products for podcasting, which you can see on his site). He described how to use AI in helping you to create show notes for your episodes. In fact, he was demonstrating how AI can help you to get inspired for show notes — but NOT be a crutch to automatically write them for you and whip them out in a couple of seconds. The tool he used was Jarvis, which is promoted as a copywriting assistant.

We are looking forward to other webinars in the same format under the leadership of Steve Stewart and company.


One question that I did ask of Daniel J Lewis while I was in the chat room of the Show Notes Summit was for the time frame for an upcoming episode of The Audacity to Podcast. The reply I got from Daniel was that we could see something very soon.

I will be waiting with bated breath for that episode to appear.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Daniel J Lewis and Steve Stewart and David Jackson and Jim Collison. All rights reserved.

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Uncategorized

577- Determining which people can be good podcast guests

In this episode, we discuss podcast interview guesting — but more from the angle of which people can be good guests as opposed to the folks for whom guesting will probably not work.

For this theme, we turn to a post from Tom Schwab, a podcast interviewer with a site called Interview Valet, as well as author of the book Podcast Guest Profits: Grow Your Business with a Targeted Interview Strategy

Now, I have known Tom Schwab since 2015, and I have interviewed him in several podcast shows, including this one, in the past. I have a copy of his book, and I find it very helpful for those who want to focus on becoming guests on other podcasts, in addition to interviewing guests. I would strongly encourage aspiring or new podcasters to read this book and find out about the art of guesting on other podcasts from podcasters, in order to get discovered and increase your reach in the podosphere.


So in this article, Tom explains how podcast guesting may not work for certain people within these five suggestions and tips:

1. “Your Clients Are Geographically Constrained

It’s not about reaching more people, it’s about reaching more ideal customers.

2. Transactional Sales with low Life Time Value

I’m not going to hire a lawyer, accountant, or surgeon from a Facebook Ad.  Conversely, if the purchase is a low-cost, low-risk, transactional purchase I don’t need to spend 30 to 45 minutes to get to know the company or founder.

3. One Time or Perishable Product

While podcasts may not be evergreen, they are like a can of soup – good for 3 to 5 years.

 

4. Your Digital Presence is Weak

When I hear you on a podcast before I engage I will check out your website and social media.  Here is an online assessment to find if podcast interview marketing will work for you.

5. Not Committed To Delivering Value

This means everyone must win: Audience, Host, Guest, and us. Guests won’t get the desired results if they don’t take an active part in making a great interview:

Show up on time                                 Use a professional mic

Add massive value                              Promote the show

Prepare (here’s our checklist)  


With these types of hints, tips and practices, you can understand how much work it will take for you to land the great podcast guest for an interview or discussion or dialog in your episode. Since Tom has made a business (and he was one of the first in 2015) of the art of guesting in podcast episodes in order to better your business, his success speaks for itself.

I would strongly encourage you to speak to Tom in perhaps an exhibit hall if your attend a podcast conference in which Tom Schwab or the Interview Valet is present. I think you will find the material and the tips  of value to you as a podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Tom Schwab and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

561- Daily Podcast shows — their possible returns with community

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the announcement of a podcast show that will be more than just episodes — it will have dialog, a community for conversations and interactions, as well as feedback and creativity. This new podcast is a re-incarnation of the prior podcast show from earlier years by Todd Henry (the podcaster from The Accidental Creative since 2005) and it is called The Daily Creative.

Now, this announcement proclaimed the arrival of the published book by Todd in September of 2022. Why, then, is he launching this podcast and this project for more than a year ahead?

Well, he wants to give his audience a chance to consume the book one episode at a time in the podcast space as the book is being “written.” And for a mere $50 per year, the audience member can join and receive the nuggets one episode at a time. And this offer to his audience members has been available since July of 2021. What a new way to monetize content for a podcaster!

Is this a new trend?

Not really.

I had commented about his earlier podcast show of The Daily Creative from an earlier episode in this series (episode 102) that was titled “Daily Podcast Show — will it survive?” 

And this episode was first published in November of 2018, with the growing trend of a daily episode in a podcast show. And the content of this 6-minute episode tended to focus on the resurrection of the daily episode of a daily podcast show — yes, THE DAILY CREATIVE by Todd Henry. And I did subscribe to this podcast show in 2018, until the podcaster went on a long break after just over 100 episodes that were published and promoted daily (Monday-Friday). And here was the discussion of the content of this episode:

And I did mention some other daily episode podcast shows in the brief history of the podosphere in that prior episode.


Now, when I received the episodes of the 2018 The Daily Creative, I saw that they were 5-to-10-minute episodes from Todd Henry. But they were very similar to a prior project in the 2006-2009 time frame, in which Todd had a premium content podcast with episodes. The project was called “AC Engage” — especially since the topics were so very similar and possibly with more details. And there were close to 150 episodes to this program. So now this seemed to be yet another opportunity for monetization with repurposed content.

Thus, for me, this new 2022 project of THE DAILY CREATIVE podcast is really the 3rd generation of Daily thoughts from Todd Henry, which indeed, he is monetizing for a suggested further audience. First, there was AC-Engage, then The Daily Creative podcast show of 2018, and now, The Daily Creative book, community and podcast of 2022.

As for this podcaster, I find the thoughts motivating and insightful and they do deliver value to both the podcaster and the entrepreneur who struggles with creativity (e.g., new media, podcasting, screencasting, video, blogging, etc.).

I would probably recommend the daily thoughts given in this newly announced series to both the podcaster and entrepreneur — for the value could be great, especially if they have been updated and enriched with the environmental challenges for the last 3 years.

So, I hope that you do find value in either written chapters of the book, or the blog or emails, or the audio podcast episodes of the 2022 The Daily Creative podcast — and that you can improve yourself to become more brilliant, more prolific and more healthy as an entrepreneur and podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Todd Henry and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

528- Podcast quality from your interview guests

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a recent post in the podcastbusinessjournal.com from Dave Jackson, podcaster of the School of Podcasting, where the topic centered on the audio quality from your interviewee and to whom the blame should be leveled. The title of this post was also mentioned in the podnews.net newsletter, and it was: “Stop blaming your guest for bad audio.”

In this post, Dave mentions that you, the interviewer, is really to be held responsible for any episode interview where your guest has bad audio. Dave says that you are to blame for letting bad audio be recorded and published in your podcast show interviews.

And Dave delivers to us several options so that you would not have to deal with sloppy or bad audio in your published interview — for example:

  •  Dave says: “You control what guests make it to your listener’s ears.”
  • Just as a potential prospect may ask you for examples from your portfolio of either art, podcasts, videos, etc., so, too, you can do the same to qualify (and later vet) a potential interviewee:  “When I have people pitch me to be on my show, if they’ve done their homework and connected their expertise to my audience (which 98% of them don’t) one of the first things I’m going to ask is, “Do you have a link to a previous interview so I can hear your audience quality?”
  • As far as equipment goes, Dave suggests several low-cost options for interviewees to deliver quality audio when they record (especially if you are doing a double-ender) — e.g., the Samson Q2U is an ideal mic (which used to be the AT202x series of mics), as well as the Blue Yeti (as long as it is configured properly and placed in the correct positions for quality audio capture). Now, for myself, there is no mention of the Samson go-mic (which is what I recommended for my co-host to use, and which he has used for 50 podcast episodes as an interviewee or co-host) or other quality mics that are affordable;
  • And finally, Dave suggests what to do for a proper job of planning for audio quality for interviews (and this is merely a way to get the interviewee to obtain the proper equipment for quality, and not a total rejection): “When you say to them, “I’d love to have you on my show, but your audio isn’t currently cutting it. If you want you can order a cheap headset or some earbuds, and we can try again later.” You’re not saying “No.” You’re saying “Not now.” 
  • And then you have the proof of the pudding when you find out why your podcast show may be suffering:  “The bottom line is if you’re wondering why your podcast isn’t growing, it may be that it’s leaving a bad taste in people’s mouth…”

Now, for this podcaster, I have had multiple interviews with many podcasters, celebrities, professionals, etc., during the past 15 years of podcasting. And the worst audio occurred when a guest refused to use a quality mic and agreed to the interview when I had to call him on Skype (remember that old application) and he did the interview from the mic on his smart phone while he was outside. Needless to say, the quality was not good and it would not stand in today’s circles of acceptability. This was an exception, for his partner (also a podcaster and a tech-guy, had wonderful audio when I had interviewed him the year before).

So, unless I know what type of equipment is being used, I would now prefer NOT to conduct an interview over the telephone. I have always preferred to do interviews in person (if possible) with my handy Zoom H2 or H4n or Q3 or even my Zoom H1 that I would hold in my hand, because I could then control the quality of the audio — and I could clean up any wrinkes in post.

But for the newer podcasters or the aspiring interviewers, I would suggest that they should take Dave’s post to heart. Some podcasters have even got to the point of having an extra quality microphone and recorder — and then sending it to the guest, so that quality would not be impaired and all glitches could be corrected in post.

So, we hope that you, as a podcaster, would be very conscientious about the required audio quality in today’s environment and insist that the right mic and the right positions of equipment and settings would be the environment for any future podcast interview recordings with your guests.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Dave Jackson and podcastbusinessjournal.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

527- Podcasting and repurposing podcast episodes

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the topic of repurposing podcast episodes within the area of improving your podcast show and helping it to grow. This theme was conceived by a recent publication of a post in the podreacher.com site, with the address of:  https://podreacher.com/podcast-repurposing-to-grow/?utm_source=podnews.net&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=podnews.net:2021-03-03

And in this mentioned article, the following are sub-topics that are discussed:

  1. why you should repurpose podcast episodes — especially helping search possibilities to your show;
  2. is repurposing worth your time as a podcaster? And to answer that question, there are several reasons given:
    • “Repurposed podcast content will help you grow if:
      • You think more people could benefit from your content.
      • Your content is mostly evergreen (meaning it won’t go out of date).
      • You have an established production process.
      • You’re open to being discovered on multiple channels.”

       

Then there is a 4-step process for repurposing podcast content;

  • Start with the end in mind;
  • Listen for tips and strategies;
  • Start writing for repurposing:
      • Use direct quotes sparingly.
      • Discard parts of the interview.
      • Ignore chronology.
      • Tighten your introduction.
      • Brainstorm multiple headlines.
      • Spot the gems.
  • Editing: refine the position;
  • Then gain practice and become a professional repurposer.

Now, I myself have repurposed content from other podcasts, as well as the current one, when it seemed appropriate. Whether the passage of time requires a refresh of the theme to grow the impact of the podcast show, or whether the theme once again crops up in the news from the podosphere — the time must be appropriate for a repurposed post.

And your downloads and other stats will prove whether it was well received — especially with the feedback.

We hope that you consider repurposing content, when appropriate. And it all does not have to be from a prior episode of your current show. You can repurpose content from other podcast shows, especially if the themes are related. I have done so with repurposed episodes from some of my prior 16 podcast shows from the past — but they must all have had a key relationship to the discussion at hand.

We hope that you, yourself, will consider the idea of repurposed content for your show, if appropriate. And if you find that this becomes a successful strategy, then we hope that your show will benefit by improving the quality and getting more subscribers and downloads which will have your listeners enjoy your content (especially for the newer listeners that were not around for the original episode of content that you repurpose now).

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and podreacher.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

526- Lessons learned after 15 years of Podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss my own lessons learned and experiences of value gained from podcasting for the last 15 years, when I became a podcaster — with having been within the podosphere as a listener for the prior 2 years (and with listening to over 100 podcast shows per week, as there were not as many shows as there are now).

In a recent edition of the podnews.net newsletter, we had an article that spoke about what experiences and benefits were learned by someone who had just celebrated seven years in podcasting (you can find it at Bruce Wawrzyniak, the host of Now Hear This who celebrated his 7th anniversary of the show with 367 episodes). Well, as a podcaster with over double the time in the podosphere as an active podcaster, and with over 1000 episodes and 2 million downloads, I wanted to also give you some perspective of an old-timer podcaster.

Now, by old-timer, I don’t mean to state that I was one of the original podcasters when the podosphere started. By no means. There were folks like Gary Leland, Todd Cochrane, CC Chapman, Paul Colligan, Rob Walch and Dave Jackson (among others) that already had podcast shows — and some for almost 2 years since 2004. Among them, I seemed to be a newcomer. And my podcast show that I promoted at the time of the early Podcast and Portable Media conference seemed pale in comparison to the work of those earlier maestros.

But now, after 15 years of podcasting, my current flagship podcast show of PodcastReporter.com has between 500 and 600 episodes; my other show of TheStrugglingBiz.com has over 100 episodes; and my other podcast show of 2030podcast.com has over 50 episodes — and the latter is done with a co-host, Matt Cox (a podcaster with over 12 years of his show, Brunch with the Brits.net).

So the question is: what experiences have I learned from podcasting in 15 years? and what is the suggestion that I deliver to new and aspiring podcasters (even though these will never be posted in the podnews.net newsletter)?

  • I have learned that technical skills are important, but that they are not the most important — what is of greatest importance is the value that your show and its episodes will provide to your audience;
  • I have learned that your communication with your audience is critical — and that goes for any planned or unplanned absences (remember — even great podcasters like Daniel J Lewis of The Audacity to Podcast show disappeared for almost six months without leaving word to his audience of any planned or unplanned absence.  But he later made up for it by publishing an episode explaining his forced absence, and then proceeded to return to the podosphere in many formats. And he keeps being a subject matter expert in his own right);
  • I have received value in the faith and commitment of my audience in staying with me, providing me with feedback and commentary, as well as giving word-of-mouth promotion to others in the podosphere;
  • I have received value in seeing the number of downloads increasing for each show (in fact, both The Struggling Entrepreneur podcast show — which has podfaded — and this show have had over 1 million downloads each, and still growing), as well as the popularity of my shows increasing;
  • I have received value when our 2030podcast.com show received promotion on an international live stream — they played episodes from this show to their audiences; they stated that this was a “quality show” to the audience; and they praised the quality of the audio, as well, to their audience and live stream. And they did this WITHOUT any requests from me or any paid promotion or marketing or sales. This occurred because they found value in the show; and as of the date of this episode, it still continues to be published with various episodes and still continues to receive admiration from listeners who found value in the content of this show, even though none of the serendipity results were planned;
  • I found value in other podcasters whom I have met in person or on the web — either a conferences or in remote interviews which I conducted for many of my 16 concurrent podcast shows that I had in 2010, and which I had to whittle down due to health and personal family issues with which I had to deal in 2016 to 2018;
  • and finally, I learned that the VALUE FOR VALUE model applies to podcasters who deliver good content to listeners. I learned this when the value was “treasure” (i.e., monetization), as well as “tech” (i.e., learning valuable technical skills and models), as well as “frienship” value (i.e., starting great relationships with the pundits of podcasting and other podcasters).

And these are just a few of the lessons learned from this podcaster in my 15 years as a podcaster and 17 years within the podosphere.

So, if you think that seven years is a lot of time to learn about value in podcasting, try learning from the podcasters who have spent more than double that time within their craft. This will help deliver lessons learned to the new and aspiring podcasters, so that they can improve their skills and become better deliverers of value to their audiences.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and 2030podcast.com and Matt Cox. All rights reserved.

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podcast

574- Response to most-asked question by podcasters

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some content that answers the issue of the most asked question by podcasters in podcasting. So in a keynote at the 2021 Podcast Movement conference, we have the speaker tell all:  “The existential question for so many of us is not how do I grow my audience, but why did my audience stop growing?

For this, we look to the web site by Tom Webster, who gave a presentation at the conference.

However, in the article from his website, Tom gives the very simple explanation that is above and beyond any SEO or promotion programs or social media referrals, etc.: “There are many answers to the question ‘how can I grow my audience,’ but there is one simple answer to the question, “why did my audience stop growing?” You might not like it, but here it is: because people stopped recommending your podcast.”

So this leads me to believe that WOMMA (“word-of-mouth-marketing-advertising”) may be the best way and the really old way in proven circles to help grow your audience. For myself, as a podcaster, I have seen this work and I am a case study of this with a podcast show that has seen its audience grow for the past year without a single SEO tactic, without a single promotion on the web or on social media, and without any paid advertising of any kind. It was strictly on referrals made by word of mouth by those podcasters who had a stream of shows listened to by the world audiences. They had mentioned that it was a great show, with value — and the audiences grew in their participation very quickly and very largely.


And although I did not plant any questions to my listeners, I feel that those who listened to the show had the following issues addressed, as Tom Webster mentions in his article:

“In my keynote at Podcast Movement I focused on the concept of recommendability, and gave three things every podcaster could do to improve theirs:

  1. Know who you are for, and why they are there
  2. Make your show easy to recommend
  3. Master your craft”

Then Tom goes into detail and explains each one of those three bullets in his presentation. He also has some charts in which he goes into detail about discoverability of podcast shows, and why you should think more about other areas beyond being discovered — especially recommendability.

And I believed that the case study of the show mentioned from my team addressed all of these in several ways. So, sometimes you can reach a level of success in growing our audience without your even planning for it or paying for it — all due to the word-of-mouth marketing and advertising given by others through recommendability.

So, thus, I would recommend that you consume the article from Tom (if you did not have a chance to consume the audio of his presentation from a virtual ticket of the conference or you did not have a presence in person at the conference). You may want to see how you may define and plan for recommendability in addition to discoverability — and beyond — for the success of your show in growing your audience.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Tom Webster and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

525- Scheduling your episodes in your Podcast show

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss an earlier post in medium.com (to which I was alerted in podnews.net) where the topic is: “Scheduling podcasts Helps you level-up without burning out.”

In this article, the topic of scheduling the date when your podcast episode will go live to your listeners and audience is addressed with the tools in RSS. In another tool, WordPress, I have used the time stamp and date feature to do my scheduling for my episodes — all of them for three podcast shows. I have done this for 15 years, and the workflow and operation that I have from editing the episode to publishing and posting and making it live all seem to flow smoothly.

But in this article that originally appeared in RSS.com podcasting, the author goes into a bit of detail (along with screen shots taken when scheduling and using RSS.com podcasting) for each topic:

  • Schedule everything to maximize efficiency;
  • Schedule when your podcast will go live;
  • Scheduling your podcast will make promotions more manageable;
  • When is the best time to schedule an episode to be released?
  • How to schedule your podcast episode (with screen shots and flow)

 


Now, for this podcaster, I have always used WordPress, and I have found it to be sufficiently adequate. Yes, there are a few flaws, as well as features that I wish that it had. But especially for the new and aspiring podcaster, this may be the proper tool at the right time. In fact, there was a tutorial on WordPress located in Udemy, the electronic catalog and learning site, which taught WordPress.

In fact, I am planning, writing the show notes and script, as well as doing the recording, editing and scheduling of this podcast episode in late February of 2021 — which is six months before this episode is scheduled to go live. How is that for scheduling an episode with some evergreen topics?

We hope that you can either learn from this episode and use the tools that are suggested, or that you can adapt WordPress to your own workflow and become a successful podcaster — and that scheduling your episodes will be something that will help you to become a better podcaster.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and medium.com and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

524- Podcasting show revives car-cast episode

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we honor the trail blazed by pundit Paul Colligan of ThePodcastReport show, as we deliver a car-cast podcast episode here.

I have delivered car-casts before, the last one in 2007, when my mother had surgery — and I had recorded my car cast while I was in the automobile in the parking lot waiting for the several hours to pass as her cancer operation finished. Unfortunately, she had passed away in 2018.

But for this episode, I used my old and trusty Zoom H2 portable recorder with a very inexpensive microphone and headset that I had used in 2006 and 2007 when I did a “roving reporter” review at the first Podcast and Portable Media Expo in Ontario, California. So, although the tech is inexpensive and old, it served its purpose well and delivered me some excellent recordings. And, yes, I did need to do some post-production on the resulting audio files.

And although this recording was a renewable experiment to go back to some of the beginnings of my podcasting career, I enjoyed the fact that a battery-operated Zoom H2 recorder stood up to the job once again. And this is in spite of not recording while driving, but just recording while I was waiting in the post office parking lot while I waited to mail my business taxes to the IRS.

As you will hear in this audio episode, several short topics were discussed — including the upcoming possible Podcast Movement conference in Nashville, Tennessee. I also included a bit about the Podfest Global Summit that started today online.

As an experienced podcaster, I do encourage you to use your portable recorder to plan for — and to record and publish — a car-cast.

As I mentioned at the start of this episode, I listened faithfully to one of my early mentors, Paul Colligan, as he made use of his time while in the car and recorded to his hands-free recorder the episode in which he delivered some great content on his thoughts. Not only did he record on ThePodcastReport.com, but he also recorded car-casts to his secondary show, Thinking Out Loud. And I always enjoyed them — as he described the tech that he was using at the beginning of each car-cast episode. And, as you can hear, I am emulating him, as well, by describing the tech at the beginning of this episode.

Thus, I hope you do get a chance to provide some variety to your listeners by delivering a car-cast and show your audience that you can be flexible and in the words of Ricky Nelson from his song, you, too, can be a “travelin’ man.”

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Paul Colligan and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

Categories
podcast

572- Take-aways from podcast conferences — then and now

In this episode of the Podcast Reporter, we discuss some “After-Action-Reports” (as they were called if you were in the military) and a promotion to describe benefits of the conference from some podcasters who did attend in person the Podcast Movement conference — in particular, the latest conference in 2021 and the very first initial conference in 2014.


The first Podcast Movement conference in 2014:

In this same podcast show, we presented an older episode of this podcast show that stated the benefits that you would miss if you would not attend Podcast Movement (initial conference in 2014):

And the slides that promoted this theme are in this PowerPoint slide presentation:

https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/fgcastgain/PDF_of_NineThings-PodcastMovement-presentation-slides_1.pdf


The recent Podcast Movement conference after-action report:

In a recent edition of the Podcast Business Journal, Matty Staudt delivered his perspectives by publishing his “Five Things I Learned at Podcast Movement.”

The summary of these benefits received by Matty are stated in the following, as Matt states: “…it was still a an amazing time with some excellent speakers. Here are my top five takeaways.”

  1. Our industry continues to be one where everyone supports each other.
  2. Podcasting for brands is becoming big business.
  3. Monetization is all the talk…. We are still a young industry and a lot needs to shake out, but I’ve never seen so many tools available to monetize shows without relying on CPM. It’s still a tough road to hoe for most, but it’s getting better.
  4. Everyone wants to be Clubhouse.
  5. Radio is getting serious and being taken more seriously.

And you may ask “who is Matty Staudt?” For your benefit, we answer that question with the information in this article:

Matty Staudt is the EVP of Podcasting for Amaze Media Labs producers of podcasts for brands and events, Founder of Jam Street Media, and former VP of Podcast Programming at iHeart. You can find him on all socials @mattystaudt or email at matty@amazemedialabs.com 


It was interesting to compare the notable benefits of attending this same conference as it has morphed into an inbound event within the podosphere. We hope that you, too, can find benefits in attending.

For this podcaster, I did attend the initial Podcast Movement conference in 2014 (in which I did share a booth and meet another podcaster, Mr. Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com); I also did attend the Podcast Movement 2020-Evolutions in February —  but I did not attend the most recent conference in Nashville in 2021.

However, I do plan to attend the 2022 Podcast Movement conference in the first quarter of the year. I have received benefits both in education and training and knowledge and in-person connections and improvement of relationships with other podcasters — as well as getting interviews from the attendees and the exhibitors at the conference.

Thus, we shall see how the situation for attending live events will evolve and what the nature of the podosphere will be at that time.

We hope that you, too, can attend a conference in person (or online in the virtual conference) and get the benefits to help your podcast show for your podcasts to grow and be successful. For this, we recommend that you do create a cost-benefit analysis to justify participating in an upcoming conference.

Thank you for your attention.

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