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podcast

585- Tips for increasing Podcast listeners

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a past post by Ben Krueger, podcaster for cashflowpodcasting.com, that deals with the 16-year-old topic of “How to increase podcast listeners.”

Now, I have known Ben Krueger personally since I had shared a booth with him in the exhibit hall of the very first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas, Texas, in 2014. And I do respect Ben in what he posts and his suggestions for improving your podcasting careers — but mainly for new and aspiring podcasters.

Ben Krueger

Now, in this post, Ben answers the question of how a podcaster can increase the listeners to his podcast show. And Ben provides for us this evergreen topic in this post.

Now, the age-old question of how to increase listeners has been addressed from a myriad of podcasters, including the “old faithful” of experienced podcasters — from Dave Jackson, Rob Walch, Paul Colligan, Daniel J Lewis, Todd Cochrane and others. In fact, I, myself had given seminars and courses and classes in person at various conferences and podcamps in the past 16 years to address this topic. So, in my opinion, there may be some new items to address recent areas of the podosphere with new tools — but, all in all, this question has been beaten up totally, although it is a question still for podcasters everywhere. And Ben gives this post the attention it deserves, lest we forget all the hints of increasing your listener base.


Now, Ben summarizes the key elements for podcast listener increases at the beginning of his post with the objectives and understanding that podcasters must have when analyzing podcast listenership:  “If you want to get more podcast listeners, you should start by focusing on creating content for a clearly niche and then building out a marketing strategy. This marketing strategy will ensure those who can extract value from your content are fully aware of its existence. To know how to increase podcast listeners, you must understand where your target audience is spending their time.”

So, in this post, Ben then addresses these topics, with details for each one of  these areas:

  • Where can I promote my podcast?
  • How can I then promote my business podcast show?
  • How can my podcast make money (including advertising)?
  • How do podcasts go viral?
  • How many listeners are good for a podcast?
  • What is good podcast growth? (Remember: “Podcast growth is the scale at which your audience continues to expand over time.”)
  • How do I make my podcast successful?
  • Why do podcasts fail?

And the summary of action items can be rolled up into the words of wisdom by Ben at the end of his post: “With the right approach, attracting new listeners to your podcast can be remarkably easy. It’s all about experimentation and testing different marketing channels to see what forms of marketing resonate with your target audience.”


So you have to be willing to test your actions in podcasting and publication — as well as the beginning steps of planning, marketing, promoting and creating episodes in your show that PROVIDE VALUE to the listeners.

So we hope that the topics and the details for these ideas can fill in some of the gaps and try to answer some questions and ideas you may have about growing and increasing your numbers of listeners to your show, and thus help your podcast show to be more successful in those areas.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaealandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

582- Recording a Podcast episode on Skype

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme that is over 15 years old — that of using Skype to record a podcast episode.

This theme brought back very old memories for myself, as I had been using Skype since 2006. And it was included in the post delivered by Ben Krueger at cashflowpodcasting.com. Now, since I have personally known Ben since 2014 and trusted him with coming up for podcasters with value deliverables and suggestions, I was interested to see about this older method of doing remote interviews and capturing audio.

My own podcasting history with Skype

Since 2005, I have been involved with the podosphere, and for over 16 years, I have been a podcaster with many of my shows including the format of remote interviews — and most of them using Skype.

My experience with the earlier versions of Skype was very dismal — it took quite a few hours to get the configuration right so that it worked. And there was an application program that provided for capturing and creating the audio for recorded interviews — PowerGramo (which is no longer available). And like other competitors at the time, one configuration of PowerGramo allowed for each of the 2 podcasters on the remote interview to be recorded on a separate track. This was wonderful and allowed slight synchronization and slight editing to get the tracks ready to save and add other content (like music and intros, etc.). Of course, this was a paid application (one-time charge) and it proved very reliable.

And the benefit was that I could also pay for an additional service from Skype called “Skype-out” — this allowed me to “dial” into analog phones or cell phones in addition to “dialing” into another Skype user via the internet. Thus, when doing an interview with someone who considered himself “low tech,” my interviewee would not have to deal with Skype (if the interviewee did not have it installed and configured for his use). This was a great benefit, as I could schedule and conduct interviews over the telephone without any problem (except using software like early versions of Izotope or Levelator  (as well as other software like Auphonic) to try and correct problems with the audio).

And finally, there was another configuration of Skype for the reverse, called Skype-In. However, for my own situation, I was the main initiator for an interview, and I did not require this at all.

But when Skype was acquired by Microsoft, my old application that worked as a Skype add-on (which was PowerGramo) no longer worked at all — and PowerGramo soon was retired after that. And then the configuring of Microsoft’s Skype became such a jumble of “electronic spaghetti” that I gave up in frustration in using my “old faithful” combination of Skype and PowerGramo. Instead, I sought out and sparingly used other applications like Evaer, etc., to do remote recordings and capturing the interviewee’s audio — but it was really not a good substitute for the PowerGramo app (RIP). And so I reverted back to my trusted double-ender method to record podcasts, even though I had to deal most of the work for both editing, finalizing mp3 files and synchronization to create the golden mp3 file.

And to this day, I have relied on the double-ender for interviews — which basically limits my current interviews to other podcasters.


Ben Krueger on recording a podcast on Skype

In the 2021 post by Ben Krueger, the theme of using Skype is discussed in detail by Ben with his declaration that he would “be breaking down everything you need to know about how to record a podcast on Skype.”

In addition to having a properly configured Skype program on your PC, you will need to have properly configured call-recording software to create an audio file from the interview or discussion (remember, I had used the older program, PowerGramo, as my call-recording software). Ben gives examples with Ecamm Call Recorder and also  GarageBandAudition, or Audacity. He also mentioned  Piezo by Rogue Amoeba. He also mentions Audio Hijack.

He continues “If you have a PC, you will want to use the professional version of Pamela for Skype.”

Also, the topic of using Zoom comes up when trying to record a podcast by using the in-built recording feature. And then he highlights a tip for creating video: “Even though you may not see an immediate use for the video content, you should record it regardless. Further down the line, you may want to leverage the video content from your recordings on platforms like YouTube and Instagram.”


So these tips may be good for you to try to prepare remote interviewing, and Skype may or may not be the best choice for you as a podcaster. If you want to try Skype for remote audio capture, then I would suggest that you consume this post with all the details that Ben gives you.

And remember that a double-ender is still a great solution when you are interviewing a remote podcaster. It may seem like more work. But the creation of your audio file, downloading your interviewee’s audio file, synchronizing both tracks of audio, adding your music, intros, outros, and other content (like bumpers, etc.) may well be worth it — for you can form a good workflow for you to have a great-sounding interview of episode with your co-host.

I will continue to rely on my double-enders and only use Evaer as remote recording software when needed to capture the remote interviewee when the double-ender is really not an option.

I hope that you, as a podcaster, can decide if Skype is for you, along with all the other options mentioned above. Whatever the case, I wish you success in creating a smooth workflow that works for YOU, and that your remote interview or co-host episodes will add to your success for your show.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

567- Podcast promotion services and their value

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss a recent post from Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com that deals with the value to the podcaster of podcast promotion services (and, of course, the value that he adds when he services you, as there is a call-to-action to use his services).

Ben Krueger

Now, as you know, I have known Ben since 2014 when he and I both shared an exhibit table at the first Podcast Movement conference in 2014. Ben has always delivered good content (and much of it in the form of free pdf files with some gems in them) and has been an advocate for working smartly and effectively to create a successful podcast show for your entrepreneurial business.

In this recent episode titled “Podcast Promotion Service (Guide for 2021),” Ben delivers some key points to educate the new and aspiring podcasters about podcast promotion services — including what they are and how to view them to decide if you should include them in your business workflow for your podcasting business.

In fact, the post from Ben has these sections with good content and explanations for each:

  • Where can I promote my podcast?
  • How do I get more podcast listeners?
  • What is a podcast promotion service?
  • What is the most popular podcast platform?
  • How do podcasts go viral?
  • How do I know if my podcast is doing well?

I would suggest that you go and examine this post with these sections to understand the nature of podcast promotion servicing, and then you can decide if such a service is right for your business, your podcast show and your workflow.

First, Ben explains what the service is:  “A podcast promotion service is designed to help you get your podcast heard by the largest number of listeners possible. Podcast promotion services will typically promote your show on different platforms to increase visibility and traffic, which can lead to more listeners and reviews.”

Besides publicizing the release of each episode and promoting it to the various audiences that you have targeted for your message, these services can add another vehicle besides WOMMA (i.e., word of mouth marketing and advertising) to allow your podcast to actually get some statistics that can give you results of your podcast distribution and see how far the word has been spread for your show.  This can help you to distribute and market your show.

Ben also focuses on Spotify and Google Podcasts as examples of some services, along with the strengths of each.

But there are others that are springing up every day. In fact, other Business Podcasters such as Adam Schaeuble of Podcast Business School will also direct you as a novice podcaster to his services, or that of others whom he trusts.

But regardless of which service provider you would consider, Ben also includes the call-to-action for his own services at cashflowpodcasting.com: “We can provide you with a broad range of data for you to see whether your podcast is performing well. Based on this data, we can make strategic improvements to your audio content to take things to the next level. If you’re looking for a podcast production service and a podcast promotion service, don’t hesitate to reach out!.”

So, we hope that this post can deliver some bit of education for you as a podcaster,  so that you can decide whether to include such services for your show and your business, in the quest for monetization. So we wish you the best in creating your podcast promotion services and using them to help make your podcast a success for you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

565- Podcast transcription services — view from experience

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the theme of podcast transcription services for your show. This theme was brought up again earlier by Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com. Thus, in this episode, we not only review Ben’s points as he reveals them, but we also add my own experiences with transcription services since 2007.

Ben Krueger

Initially, we look at Ben’s idea in his post titled “Podcast transcription service — why do you need one?”

As Ben discussed, “you should consider transcribing your podcast episodes into long-form blog content. Many fail to recognize the value of presenting content in a variety of different forms . . .”

And from a marketing strategy perspective, Ben elaborates on the following questions about podcast transcription services:

  • 1. Why should you use a podcast transcription service?  [and a key answer to this, as explained in the detail, is: “The most obvious reason why you might want to use a podcast transcription service is to deliver content that appeals to those who prefer reading over listening.”
  • 2. How much does it cost to transcribe a podcast?
  • 3. Where can I get a transcript of a podcast?
  • 4. What can a podcast transcript be used for?
  • 5. How do I transcribe a podcast myself?

Also, as Ben states in his post, the benefit of transcribed content can add to the reach of your audience:  “Podcast transcription services are a great way to reach an even wider audience, as they can deliver the audio content in text form.”

And Ben continues with detail for each of the sections he presents in his post about transcription services.


Now, for this podcaster, I have used transcription services for my shows since late 2006 and all through 2007 to 2011, up to the time when I had over 15 podcast shows in production all at the same time. And I used them initially for my flagship podcast at that time, The Struggling Entrepreneur — and then I also used them for minor shows when it made sense to promote my shows in products, offerings, offers and get some SEO benefits from them. I also printed some and offered them in writing within media kits that I had produced and delivered strategically at Podcast conferences and business shows.

The company I had used was Noble Transcription Service, which was in the California area and which I had encountered in a booth at one of the first Podcast conferences (i.e., Podcast and Portable Media Expo in Ontario, California).

This firm delivered on one of their biggest strengths:  “100% Human Transcription for Accuracy, Clarity, and to Understand Nuance.”

Now, I had tried automated transcription blogs, sites, offerings and other products — and none of them delivered prompt and accurate transcriptions of my posts or interviews. However, Noble Transcription Services excelled in speedy delivery and perfect transcripts delivered electronically in pdf format, as well as word processing formats (for my later editing). And they made sure that the human corrections and perfection were included. This was much better both from a QUALITY point of view, as well as a PRICE-PERFORMANCE viewpoint. In short, my opinion was that they delivered the best deal than any automated or other competitive offering or product around at the time.

And, as you can read from Ben’s post, the BENEFITS of having transcriptions of your episodes in your shows can deliver favorable results for your business and your podcasts across your marketing channels:

  • “Transcripts can be turned into long-form blog content.
  • Extracts of transcripts can be used as copy for social media posts.
  • Transcripts can form the basis of email newsletters.
  • Transcripts can be used in e-books other long-form mediums.”

However, as a podcaster, you need to do an analysis of the COST and PRICE of transcripts — for they do not come freely. There is a cost in time, effort, quality control, review,  nurturing, updating, checking feedback and management — and this is in addition to the financial cost in dollars that you have to include in your plans and budgets, as well.

And with some of the competitors in podcast production nowadays, you can see that transcription services of some kind (many of them near poor quality with a lot of mistakes from automated or AI-type support to produce them) may be included with your podcast production support provider. But my opinion is caveat emptor. In other words, you may lose valuable time, effort and money in choosing a service that may not suit your needs or deliver poor quality results from your expectations.

And, as usual, Ben suggests what the cost may be to you as a podcaster and he delivers a call-to-action to his firm for getting a proven transcription service for your podcast. And this is part of his offer to you as a podcaster.

Thus, regardless of your decision to use and publish transcriptions of your episodes and shows, we hope that you will find a good transcription service that will deliver the speed, quality and price-performance that will support your business and podcast, and which will help to make you successful.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2022, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

554- How to turn listeners into clients as a podcast host

In this episode of the Podcast Reporter show, we discuss the topics delivered to us earlier this year by Ben Krueger, the podcaster from his program called cashflowpodcasting.com. These topics revolve around the ideas proposed by him in 5 tips of how to be “an amazing podcast host” and gain success by turning listeners into paid clients.

Ben Krueger

As Ben begins his discussion, he starts off with the question of: “Whether you’re doing solo episodes or interviews, being a great podcast host really comes down to two major things:

  • Be Human (and get the connection with your listeners); and
  • Be a Champion for your audience; or, as he states: “A great way to make sure you’re following this rule is to ask yourself one question before every episode: What do my listeners need to know, and how can I help them understand?”

and Ben explains with examples what he means by those suggestions in making your content impactful and meaningful to your listeners — especially in getting behind the scenes if your guest in an interview tends to give you “fluff” answers: “Just remember that if you are doing interviews, you have to make it your mission to uncover key insights during the conversations with your guests.” (and that means getting the guest to deliver educational and engaging content). And Ben gives examples and links to further his point.


So the five main tips for making powerful conversion content are:

  • Educate and motivate action (especially with actionable items today);
  • Provide social proof;
  • Give a clear next step;
  • Provide good calls-to-action for the listeners;
  • Follow through with good stories and examples that inspire, especially from his promotion of his Autopilot book (given in the post’s show notes by Ben).

Of course, Ben wants to be your mentor in helping you to prepare your audience for your own success within his program.

And, as someone who has personally known Ben since 2014, I would say that his suggestions are well worth looking at and examining it. I have only given you a small peek at his post with the tips — but I encourage you to review the content in light of your own podcast to see if you can pick the gems and examples that may relate to your own business and podcast shows, so that you can adapt his tips for your own success.

Remember that his 5 tips can be found (in some detail) at https://cashflowpodcasting.com/be-an-amazing-podcast-host/

And we wish you the best in becoming an “amazing podcast host” with your show and having success in your business.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

596- Tips on uploading your podcast

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some general hints delivered to you (as an aspiring or new podcaster) from Ben Krueger, podcaster and consultant who has a site called cashflowpodcasting.com.

Ben has always been a great consultant and provider of good information for the new and aspiring podcaster since I have known him (from the time that we shared a table together in the exhibit hall of the first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas). His advice and his free deliverables and pdf files contain good information most of the time, and I would highly encourage you to see his multi-step approach to planning, producing, publishing and promoting a podcast.

In an episode on 30 November 2021, Ben gives several hints and tips for uploading a podcast. But he goes a couple of steps further and recommends what some actionable steps would be to publish the podcast show and episodes, as well as some words about streaming your show episodes and areas of increased publicity for your web site of your show.


In an article for 30 November 2021 titled “How to upload a podcast,” Ben makes three strong suggestions for actionable steps in the distribution of a podcast, as well as the upload of episodes:

  • “Upload your podcast files to a podcast hosting service.
  • Submit your episode to all streaming platforms at once.
  • Publish episode players from your host to your own website.”

He then provides sections of the articles with more details about the process that a podcaster should consider about uploads, distribution and promotion:

  • How to upload a podcast episode;
  • The cost of uploading a podcast episode in your show;
  • How to submit your first podcast episode;
  • Where to post your first podcast;
  • How to post a podcast for free (some suggested ideas);
  • Would Spotify be a good choice for a free posting?
  • A discussion about the most popular podcast platform;
  • How to upload a podcast episode to your own site;
  • Some final ideas about suggested tools and templates: “Initially, it seems logical to use the website template offered by the hosting service to create a website for your show. Further down the line, you could explore creating a website using a third-party service that would potentially offer greater flexibility around the layout and design.”

For this podcaster, I have been using the templates and tools in which I learned during my initial period in podcasting many years ago. I have upgraded some of them, as I do wish to improve the speed of creation and publication of my episodes. I got a lot of them from the time when I did hire a consultant to help me with improving my initial podcasting — and that was Dave Jackson from The School of Podcasting.

There was also one aspect in Dave Jackson’s episode from November of 2021, in which he put out a request for podcasters to answer his “question of the month” for answering how much time is spent by a podcaster from the idea creation stage to the point where a podcast episode is released by pressing the PUBLISH button. It was interesting to see how podcasters have become more sophisticated in the area of creating and publishing their podcast episodes — including myself (I did contribute my discussion from my name of Sergeant Fred).

We hope that these ideas in the article, along with Dave Jackson’s episode, can help you to refine your uploading, publishing, streaming and distribution of your podcast episodes.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and michaelandmike.com and Ben Krueger of cashflorpodcasting.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

592- Best practices in podcasting

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review some ideas and suggestions from Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com that deal with suggested BEST PRACTICES for podcasting. This theme was discussed in a post from Ben Krueger in his site titled “Podcast Best Practices for 2021.”

Ben Krueger

As you may remember, I have known Ben since 2014, when we both were at an exhibit table at the very first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas. In my opinion, Ben is a professional podcaster who has delivered lots of good suggestions, especially for the aspiring and new podcasters. And he has posted many documents for free from his site that do add value.

In this post, he reviews some suggested BEST PRACTICES for the podcaster that may add value to the podcasting effort. It is highly recommended that you, as a podcaster, should list some best practices used by other podcasters of note. Then you can look at them and see if you can integrate some of them that may work well for your own podcast shows. Perhaps some of these can help your show to stand out as “value-driven content.” Remember, as Ben mentions, there really is no magic formula for everyone.

Here is a summary of the introduction by Ben about best practices and his discussion: Podcast best practices inevitably change from one year to the next. As the streaming landscape begins to mature, it’s never been more important to follow podcast best practices and deploy a range of strategies to attract engaged audio listeners. While the consumption of audio content is increasing, listeners only have so much time in a day to engage with podcasts.”

  • Provide your audience with as much value as possible;
  • Create a memorable podcast name and optimize titles: “Establishing a clear value proposition begins with a memorable podcast name.”
  • Strike a balance between creativity and authenticity;
  • Involve your target audience in the conception of the podcast, including the podcast name(s): “Launching a podcast without consulting your target audience is a poor strategy.”
  • Utilize Welcome and send-off phrases to build audience trust to help establish a sense of familiarity;
  • Consistency in how you open and close your episodes adds structure to your content;
  • Take note of how hosts in other podcasts within your niche open and close each episode;
  • Cross-sell other podcast episodes and related content;
  • Consistently schedule and publish new podcast episodes to have your listeners include your episodes as part of their routine;
  • Communicate your publishing schedule to your listeners;
  • Engage in marketing and promotion efforts: “…you cannot rely on organic discovery on these platforms to build an audience.”
  • What is recommended is  leveraging social media marketing to create awareness around your new podcast episodes.

Ben then sums up his post with the emphasis on delivering value to your audience: “Every best practice related to producing a podcast ultimately stems back to value creation.”

Thus, we hope that you can consume this post and see if any (or all) of these suggestions may help you to increase the value of your podcast show and to engage great listeners so that your podcast show can be a success and deliver the great value to your audience.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

579- Steps for positive podcast interviews

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we review a post from podcaster Ben Krueger that deals with the steps in how to interview someone for a podcast.

In this post, Ben gives some steps needed for successful interviews of your guests for your podcast episodes:

  1. “Find guests that you are genuinely interested in.
  2. Do extensive research on the guest to identify talking points.
  3. Listen to previous podcast interviews featuring the guest.
  4. Avoid interrupting the guest during the conversation.
  5. Make sure they are given plenty of time to speak.
  6. Don’t be afraid to challenge guests on their opinions.
  7. Practice the concept of active listening.
  8. Talk with the guest before you start recording.
  9. Always keep the conversation moving forward.
  10. Create batches of questions on particular topics.”

An example of this type of interviewer is Bill O’Reilly of the “No-spin news” podcast show. He interviews guests from BOTH SIDES OF THE ISLE or of differing perspectives, so that he can show that he will respect the viewpoints of the pros and cons of a particular topic (even if they may not agree totally with what he says or with his own “narrative” — because everyone does have a hidden narrative).


Many interviewers suffer from “group-think” or from subjective opinion-based narratives from which they cannot remove themselves when talking to others or interviewing others. This type of narrow-minded thinking will always go along with the narrative-of-the-day along the “party lines” that dictate what to say and how to say it, regardless of possible truth or issues that may surface when you have someone giving you a different point of view that may have merit.

Now, Ben stresses the dangers that may be underlying in your own attitude when you have basically a mindset that demands group-think or when you do not really want true and honest opinions and viewpoints from your guest that you interview. He states: “If you’re not interested in their opinions and perspectives, there will likely be an absence of thoughtful interview questions – and this will damage the value proposition of the content. To create great audio content with guests, you must lead with passion. It’s essential to focus on topics that both you and the audience care about.”


For this podcaster, my suggestions would be to review the steps outlined by Ben Krueger and see if they match your workflow and elements in planning and executing various podcast guest interviews. In fact, you may have an additional step or two that will help you to ensure clear, concise, fair and impartial interviews that will have an impact on your listeners.

As you may remember, I have known personally Ben since the 2014 time frame, when I shared a booth in the exhibit hall of the very first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas. I know that he has delivered good information and free pdfs at times for his listeners. He has suggested many tips and techniques which I consider of value, especially for the new and aspiring podcasters.

Ben Krueger

And although the steps that he outlines may take more time and seem to cause more trouble and time for you, they may be helpful in the long-term for you and your credibility as an interviewer. They certainly cannot hurt, and they may cement good habits in the preparation of guest interviews for you, the podcaster, in the future for your episodes and shows. And I, myself, have adopted a couple of these in my workflow that have already paid off with valuable results in my interviews for my podcasts. We hope that you will find some additional formulas for success with your podcast guest interviews.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.

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podcast

532- Podcasting production partners and how to look for one

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we discuss the topic of podcasting production partners — and how to find one, with some tips that are delivered by Ben Krueger in his recent podcast blog and series of cashflowpodcasting.com.

To find a podcast production partner, there are several key tips from Ben in his post, which can give you, the podcaster, an idea of what to look for and some key elements besides the relationship you may have with some other candidates (be it personal or business) and looking forward to the ultimate results for your business podcast.

The key ideas in this post are the following:

  • Make sure all parties are working toward a clear objective that can be articulated by yourself;
  • The challenges in both in-person collaboration and separation of duties vs. the remote work assignments and coordination;
  • Of course, Ben emphasizes the need for streamlined processes in order to be successful (and, of course, he spares no content in reminding you that his firm will have them and support you with them in finding a partner);
  • Do your candidates have the expertise and knowledge to develop content for your target market?
  • Also consider the quality of the marketing materials used to promote the audio content;
  • Inspect the track record of a candidate who has proven that he will have a sharp eye on details;
  • Research how much a podcast production partner should be compensated, as well as the cost of production of a podcast;
  • Determine if a solo podcast show in episodes is the format for you to follow, or if more need to be involved in the production;
  • Determine the source of production equipment (or you may have to accept that you will purchase these yourself);
  • What will be the repurposing strategy for your content — perhaps into other forms of media?
  • What kind of guest “pipeline” will be needed to have a continuous influx of guests for your show, if you will have guests?
  • What kind of scripting strategy will you have to create content around your show and be relevant to your audience?

These are the key items that Ben discusses in his post. And for many aspiring podcasters, these may make a great deal of the topics that need to be asked before launching a show with just a faint idea of who should be the podcast production team.


Ben Krueger

Now, Ben Krueger is someone that I have known since we first met at the initial Podcast Movement conference in Dallas in 2014. Ben is the founder of Cashflow Podcasting and he specializes in helping thought leaders entrepreneurs amplify their impact through podcasting.  He’s a world traveler, outdoor sports junkie and future enthusiast! He also has shared with us (within this podcast series and others) not only ideas on podcasting, but some key gems for free in the form of pdf files and topics that can be key as help to future podcasters and current podcasters. We thank Ben for his contributions to the podosphere.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger and michaelandmike.com . All rights reserved.

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podcast

560- Podcast subscription services — seeing the value

In this episode of The Podcast Reporter, we go into the theme of podcast subscription services. And for this, we refer to an article posted by podcaster Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com.

Ben Krueger

As we have stated here before, I personally have known Ben since 2014, when we met side-by-side at the exhibit hall of the first Podcast Movement conference in Dallas.

Since then, Ben has delivered lots of great content, especially aimed for the new and aspiring podcaster. And, of course, his calls-to-action are for a subscription to his services or for using his deliverables to help you increase your productivity and head to podcasting success.

In this case, the article that he delivers to us is about the Podcast Subscription Services and their worth to you. He describes what they are in simple terms:  “Podcast subscriptions give you (the podcaster) an opportunity to sell your content to listeners. You can choose to keep some of your content free and create exclusive content for paying listeners or opt for all your episodes to be paid moving forward.”

After explaining what they are, the main topics he covers are the following:

  • How can these services benefit my podcast?
  • What types of podcast subscription services are there?
  • Podcaster options for creating a podcast subscription — and he gives examples with both Apple and Spotify;
  • A wrap-up for monetization that you may select — it is up to you, and there is no one single model.

For monetization options, Ben has always been creative and descriptive of the means for podcasters to generate revenue — especially if the podcaster wants to start a business podcast show.

Please remember that Ben has several free pdfs that outline not only his solutions for you, but also refers to others who have certain expertise that can always assist you: “Ben Krueger is the founder of Cashflow Podcasting and he specializes in helping thought leaders entrepreneurs amplify their impact through podcasting.”

I hope that you can reflect on the subscription services that will help your podcast show generate the revenue with the best model for your business, and that they will be worth it for you to invest some time in creating and executing those that will be beneficial for you.

Thank you for your attention.

Copyright (c) 2021, Matrix Solutions Corporation and Ben Krueger of cashflowpodcasting.com and michaelandmike.com. All rights reserved.